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Open AccessArticle

In-Bag Dry- vs. Wet-Aged Lamb: Quality, Consumer Acceptability, Oxidative Stability and In Vitro Digestibility

1
School of Science, Faculty of Health and Environment Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
Meat Quality Team, Food & Bio-Based Products, AgResearch Ltd., Grasslands, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
3
Knowledge & Analytics, AgResearch Ltd., Ruakura Research Centre, Hamilton 3214, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2021, 10(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010041
Received: 24 October 2020 / Revised: 14 December 2020 / Accepted: 23 December 2020 / Published: 25 December 2020
The aim of this study was to produce in-bag dry-aged lamb and compare its meat quality, consumer acceptability, oxidative stability and in vitro digestibility to the wet-aged equivalents. Significantly higher pH, weight loss and reduced cook loss were observed in dry-aged lamb compared to the wet-aged (p < 0.0001). Dry-aged lamb had harder and chewier texture profiles and lower colour attributes (L*, a* and b*) than the wet-aged (p < 0.001). The dry-aged and wet-aged lamb were equally preferred (around 40% each) by the consumer panel, underpinning the niche nature of dry-aged meat. Significantly (p < 0.05) higher yeast and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TABRS) levels were observed in dry-aged lamb compared to the wet-aged. There was no difference in fatty acid profile, protein carbonyl content and pattern of proteolysis between ageing regimes (p > 0.05). Ageing regimes had no impact on overall digestibility; however, a greater gastric digestibility was observed in dry-aged lamb through the increased release of free amino acids (FAAs) compared to the wet-aged. Outcomes of this study demonstrated for the first time the possibility of producing dry-aged lamb legs of acceptable quality, oxidative stability and superior digestibility compared to the equivalent wet-aged lamb. View Full-Text
Keywords: in-bag dry-ageing; lamb chops; consumer acceptability; lipid oxidation; protein carbonyl; digestibility; free amino acids in-bag dry-ageing; lamb chops; consumer acceptability; lipid oxidation; protein carbonyl; digestibility; free amino acids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, R.; Yoo, M.J.Y.; Realini, C.E.; Staincliffe, M.; Farouk, M.M. In-Bag Dry- vs. Wet-Aged Lamb: Quality, Consumer Acceptability, Oxidative Stability and In Vitro Digestibility. Foods 2021, 10, 41. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010041

AMA Style

Zhang R, Yoo MJY, Realini CE, Staincliffe M, Farouk MM. In-Bag Dry- vs. Wet-Aged Lamb: Quality, Consumer Acceptability, Oxidative Stability and In Vitro Digestibility. Foods. 2021; 10(1):41. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010041

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Renyu; Yoo, Michelle J.Y.; Realini, Carolina E.; Staincliffe, Maryann; Farouk, Mustafa M. 2021. "In-Bag Dry- vs. Wet-Aged Lamb: Quality, Consumer Acceptability, Oxidative Stability and In Vitro Digestibility" Foods 10, no. 1: 41. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010041

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