Special Issue "New Insights into Microbial Interactions for Sustainable Winemaking"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Roberto Carmine Foschino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food, Enviromental and Nutritional Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Interests: microbiology; food microbiology; food safety; food quality; biotechnology; microbial interactions; yeasts; lactic acid bacteria; acetic acid bacteria; bacterial pathogens; bacteriophages; biocontrol; fermented foods; wine; beer; dairy products; cheese; bakery products
Prof. Dr. Ileana Vigentini
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food, Enviromental and Nutritional Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Interests: microbiology; biotechnology; wine microbiology; microbial biodiversity; Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, yeast physiology; malolactic bacteria; melatonin; microbial biocontrol
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

What will be the future of wine? 

The answer to this question represents a great challenge for many reasons such as the environmental sustainability of the productive chain, the economic and social impact in some vine-growing areas and the rising criticism of alcohol consumption.

This Special Issue aims to provide a better understanding and exploitation of microbial interactions, rethinking wine as a more sustainable and healthier food. Advancements in grape and wine microbiology and technology addressed to the following areas will be considered for publication:

  • the role of plant-associated microorganisms to cope with abiotic stress;
  • fungi and bacteria in biocontrol of grapevines and grapes;
  • a reduction in harmful chemical content in wine, like ethanol, biogenic amines, mycotoxins and sulphites, by use of innovative microbial applications;
  • the exploitation of microbial interactions to control wine spoilage;
  • the enhancement of wine quality by exploiting its nutraceutical features and improving its sensory characteristics;
  • innovative low alcoholic beverages and non-alcoholic drinks addressed to an efficient, circular and zero waste production.

Prof. Roberto Carmine Foschino
Prof. Dr. Ileana Vigentini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bio-active compounds in grape and wine
  • bio-control
  • bio-protection grape-related bacteria
  • grape-related fungi
  • harmful chemicals reduction in winemaking
  • innovation in winemaking
  • innovative beverages from grape
  • microbial interactions
  • nutraceuticals in wine
  • sustainable winemaking
  • vine-associated microorganisms
  • waste reduction in winemaking
  • wine microorganisms
  • wine quality
  • wine safety
  • wine spoilage

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dominance of S. cerevisiae Commercial Starter Strains during Greco di Tufo and Aglianico Wine Fermentations and Evaluation of Oenological Performances of Some Indigenous/Residential Strains
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1549; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111549 - 26 Oct 2020
Abstract
In order to evaluate dominance/implantation of starter cultures for wine fermentation, both commercial starters and wild strains were monitored during the fermentation of Greco di Tufo (GR) and Aglianico of Taurasi (AGL) musts. Preliminary characterization of commercial strains was carried out by several [...] Read more.
In order to evaluate dominance/implantation of starter cultures for wine fermentation, both commercial starters and wild strains were monitored during the fermentation of Greco di Tufo (GR) and Aglianico of Taurasi (AGL) musts. Preliminary characterization of commercial strains was carried out by several molecular markers. Five fermentations—four starter-inoculated and one spontaneous—were carried out in duplicates by using grapes from GR and AGL. Trials were monitored, and yeast cultures were isolated within the dominant microflora. Comparison of Interdelta patterns allowed to assess the real occurrence of both starters and indigenous strains. A high genetic diversity within S. cerevisiae strains was detected. In starter-led fermentations (except for few cases), in addition to the starter strains, indigenous S. cerevisiae biotypes were found, as well. Native strains isolated from replicates of the same fermentation showed different genetic profiles. Spontaneous fermentations were conducted, during the first 5 days, by non-Saccharomyces yeasts and, afterwards, by a high number (16 in the AGL and 20 in the GR) of S. cerevisiae biotypes. Indigenous biotypes isolated by GR revealed a high variability in oenological features and, in several cases, showed better performances than those recorded for commercial strains. The study further highlighted the low dominance of some commercial starter cultures. Moreover, autochthonous yeast strains proved to be sometimes more aggressive in terms of fermentation vigor in GR must, likely because better adapted to ecological and technological conditions occurring during winemaking. Finally, the use of such strains for production of autochthonous “pied de cuve” may be a useful strategy for lowering production cost of winemaking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Microbial Interactions for Sustainable Winemaking)
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