Special Issue "Microbiology Research in Meat and Meat Production"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Beniamino T. Cenci-Goga

Department of Veterinary Medicine, Laboratorio di Ispezione degli alimenti di origine animale, University of Perugia, Italy
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Interests: food; microbiology; safety; meat; hygiene; quality; public; health
Guest Editor
Dr. Paola Sechi

Department of Veterinary Medicine, Laboratorio di Ispezione degli alimenti di origine animale, University of Perugia, Italy
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Interests: food; microbiology; safety; meat; hygiene; quality; public; health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meat production and consumption have received increasing attention after the October 2015 press release from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer, a part of the world health organization) on the results of the working group on the evaluation of the carcinogenicity of the consumption of red and processed meats. More recently, in April 2018, IARC eventually published the full monograph (Volume 114—Red meat and processed meat).

Other important topics in the agenda of the so-called “research-policy interface” include the effect of micro-organisms in meat, and the factors affecting the growth and survival of micro-organisms, along with meat preservation, public health issues, foodborne diseases, methods for laboratory analysis and quality control of meat production.

Meat safety and the protection of consumer interests, along with quality of production, are of increasing concern to the general public, non-governmental organizations, professional associations, international trading partners and trade organizations. It is necessary to ensure that consumer confidence and the confidence of trading partners is secured through the open and transparent development of food law and through public authorities taking appropriate steps to inform the public where there are reasonable grounds to suspect that a food may present a risk to health. The current regulations lay down the general principles of food law and therefore provide the ultimate definitions of risk, including risk analysis, risk assessment, risk management, risk communication, hazard, traceability and precautionary principle.

When it comes to food of animal origin, eating meat in a routine and non-celebratory manner is a fairly recent occurrence in human history, since domesticated animals were too valuable to slaughter. In addition, without refrigeration, meat that was not consumed in a single meal would go to waste. The slaughter of an animal took place only on some festive occasion, with many guests and extended household gathered in one place. Nowadays, while the concluding answer for global food security is still uncertain, several groups have raised moral questions regarding animal breeding, transportation and slaughter.

Meat production and consumption is therefore a very interesting topic, which includes safety, quality, nutritional, ethical, and marketing aspects, because food is more than a metabolic fuel. It has physiological, psychological, social, cultural, and aesthetic associations that merge to form a gestalt that people endorse and maintain. The contribution of any food towards an individual’s wellbeing is as complex as the individual. In this context, the benefits of consuming food that contains hazards may even outweigh some risks.

Prof. Dr. Beniamino T. Cenci-Goga
Dr. Maria Francesca Iulietto
Dr. Paola Sechi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • meat
  • meat products
  • production
  • slaughter
  • safety
  • quality
  • risk
  • microbiology
  • meat preservation
  • meat spoilage
  • fermentation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in Poultry in Three Spanish Farms, A Slaughterhouse and A Further Processing Plant
Received: 6 March 2019 / Revised: 17 March 2019 / Accepted: 21 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
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Abstract
The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in a selection of poultry flocks and the corresponding broiler carcasses as well as the possible impact of contamination during slaughter and processing. Samples of the same flock at different ages [...] Read more.
The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in a selection of poultry flocks and the corresponding broiler carcasses as well as the possible impact of contamination during slaughter and processing. Samples of the same flock at different ages in three farms (A, B and C) were taken for the determination of Campylobacter spp. The same broiler flocks were examined at different stages of one slaughterhouse and at a further processing plant. The slaughterhouse environment and processing equipment were sampled. Campylobacter spp. was not detected in 7 and 14-day-old broilers in any of the three farms studied. However, Campylobacter spp. was detected in 35 and 42-day-old broilers at two farms (Farm A and B). This pathogen was detected in both dirty and clean transport crates, in scalding water, and on the defeathering machine and the working table at the end of the working day, but not at the beginning. After defeathering, Campylobacter spp. was detected in all of the sampled carcasses. Campylobacter spp. was detected in all of the carcasses and the poultry meat portion samples from Farm C, although it was not detected at the farm level. This suggests that Campylobacter spp. infected flocks may be a source of these bacteria in the corresponding carcasses, but a cross-contamination during the transportation and slaughter process is also very important. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiology Research in Meat and Meat Production)
Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Antimicrobial Interventions against E. coli O157:H7 on the Surface of Raw Beef to Reduce Bacterial Translocation during Blade Tenderization
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 4 February 2019 / Accepted: 15 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4256 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The US Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) considers mechanically-tenderized beef as “non-intact” and a food safety concern because of the potential for translocation of surface Escherichia coli O157:H7 into the interior of the meat that may be cooked “rare or [...] Read more.
The US Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) considers mechanically-tenderized beef as “non-intact” and a food safety concern because of the potential for translocation of surface Escherichia coli O157:H7 into the interior of the meat that may be cooked “rare or medium-rare” and consumed. We evaluated 14 potential spray interventions on E. coli O157:H7-inoculated lean beef wafers (~106 CFU/cm2, n = 896) passing through a spray system (18 s dwell time, ~40 pounds per square inch, PSI) integrated into the front end of a Ross TC-700MC tenderizer. Inoculated and processed beef wafers were stomached with D/E neutralizing broth and plated immediately, or were held in refrigerated storage for 1-, 7-, or 14-days prior to microbial enumeration. Seven antimicrobials that showed better performance in preliminary screening on beef wafers were selected for further testing on beef subprimals in conjunction with blade tenderization. Boneless top sirloin beef subprimals were inoculated at ~2 × 104 CFU/cm2 with a four-strain cocktail of E. coli O157:H7 and passed once, lean side up, through an integrated spray system and blade tenderizer. Core samples obtained from each subprimal were examined for the presence/absence of E. coli O157:H7. The absence of E. coli O157:H7 in core samples correlated with the ability of the antimicrobials to reduce bacterial levels on the surface of beef prior to blade tenderization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiology Research in Meat and Meat Production)
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Open AccessCommunication
Evaluation of Commercial Prototype Bacteriophage Intervention Designed for Reducing O157 and Non-O157 Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) on Beef Cattle Hide
Received: 5 June 2018 / Revised: 4 July 2018 / Accepted: 13 July 2018 / Published: 16 July 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Microbiological safety of beef products can be protected by application of antimicrobial interventions throughout the beef chain. This study evaluated a commercial prototype antimicrobial intervention comprised of lytic bacteriophages formulated to reduce O157 and non-O157 Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) on beef cattle hide [...] Read more.
Microbiological safety of beef products can be protected by application of antimicrobial interventions throughout the beef chain. This study evaluated a commercial prototype antimicrobial intervention comprised of lytic bacteriophages formulated to reduce O157 and non-O157 Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) on beef cattle hide pieces, simulating commercial pre-harvest hide decontamination. STEC reduction in vitro by individual and cocktailed phages was determined by efficiency of plating (EOP). Following STEC inoculation onto hide pieces, the phage intervention was applied and hide pieces were analyzed to quantify reductions in STEC counts. Phage intervention treatment resulted in 0.4 to 0.7 log10 CFU/cm2 (p < 0.01) E. coli O157, O121, and O103 reduction. Conversely, E. coli O111 and O45 did not show any significant reduction after application of bacteriophage intervention (p > 0.05). Multiplicity of infection (MOI) evaluation indicated E. coli O157 and O121 isolates required the fewest numbers of phages per host cell to produce host lysis. STEC-attacking phages may be applied to assist in preventing STEC transmission to beef products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiology Research in Meat and Meat Production)
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