Special Issue "Innovative Biopreservation and Risk Modelling Approaches for Ensuring Microbial Safety and Quality of Fermented Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ursula Andrea Gonzales-Barron
Website
Guest Editor
CIMO Mountain Research Center, School of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Santa Apolónia Campus, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: predictive microbiology; quantitative risk assessment; meta-analysis; statistical quality control; Bayesian applications; experimental designs; shelf-life determination
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Vasco Cadavez
Website
Guest Editor
CIMO Mountain Research Center, School of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Santa Apolónia Campus, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: quality of meat and meat products; dynamic modelling; process optimization; linear and non-linear modelling; predictive microbiology; meta-regression; web applications; databases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biopreservatives such as functional starter cultures and plant-based antimicrobials have been widely proposed, tested, and validated as hurdles to increase microbiological quality and safety of fermented products. LAB strains selected for producing specific bacteriocins and/or for their acidogenic capacity have been used as functional starter cultures, while natural extracts have been added directly to fermented foods or even incorporated into packaging materials or coated films. Plant-based extracts have been demonstrated to also be effective in delaying degradation and nutritional quality loss, and enhancing organoleptic attributes. Nonetheless, such advances and innovations should be coupled with predictive models, probabilistic models or quantitative risk assessment models that could enable a quantitative appraisal of the impact of such hurdle technologies on either quality loss dynamics or microbial dynamics for food preservation. The Special Issue “Innovative Biopreservation and Risk Modelling Approaches for Ensuring Microbial Safety and Quality of Fermented Foods” seeks to reunite novel work on systematic reviews/meta-analysis of biopreservation agents; challenge studies involving the application of biopreservative agents in fermented foods; elucidation of microbial interactions in food fermentations through genomic approaches; quantitative assessment of new, effective biopreservatives for improving quality, controlling microbiological hazards, extending shelf-life, and reducing product deterioration and food waste; and predictive microbiology, probabilistic or process risk models that assist in the decision of the most appropriate processing strategies to be implemented to ensure quality and safety of fermented foods. This Special Issue welcomes scientific research aiming to strengthen the sustainable production of artisanal fermented foods of traditional recipes in less privileged regions of the world.

Prof. Dr. Ursula Gonzales-Barron
Prof. Vasco Cadavez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Functional starter cultures
  • Microbial interaction
  • Antimicrobials
  • Challenge studies
  • Cheese
  • Meat products
  • Predictive microbiology
  • Shelf-life
  • Quantitative risk assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Ohmic Heating on Sensory, Physicochemical, and Microbiological Properties of “Aguamiel” of Agave salmiana
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1834; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121834 - 10 Dec 2020
Abstract
The use of ohmic heating (OH) processing technologies in beverages might provide a higher quality value to the final product; consumers tended to prefer more natural products with minimum preservative substances. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of OH [...] Read more.
The use of ohmic heating (OH) processing technologies in beverages might provide a higher quality value to the final product; consumers tended to prefer more natural products with minimum preservative substances. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of OH over the presence of microorganisms in “aguamiel” as well as to study the effects on physicochemical analysis like total sugars, soluble solids, electric conductivity pH, and color. The results showed that the conductivity of “aguamiel” was 0.374 s/m, this as temperature increased, conductivity rose as well. During OH a bubbling was observed when reaching 70 °C due to the generation of electrochemical reactions during the OH process. OH had a significant effect in the reduction of E. coli, yeast, and lactobacillus compared to conventional pasteurization, reaching optimal conditions for its total inactivation. Regarding its physicochemical properties, both treatments, conventional pasteurization and OH, did not show negative changes in aguamiel, demonstrating that OH technology can be a feasible option as a pasteurization technique. In conclusion it is important to notice that negative changes were not found in quality, color and sugars of “aguamiel”. Therefore, ohmic heating can be an option to replace traditional methods used for pasteurization. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Essential Oils on Escherichia coli Inactivation in Cheese as Described by Meta-Regression Modelling
Foods 2020, 9(6), 716; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060716 - 02 Jun 2020
Abstract
The growing intention to replace chemical food preservatives with plant-based antimicrobials that pose lower risks to human health has produced numerous studies describing the bactericidal properties of biopreservatives such as essential oils (EOs) in a variety of products, including cheese. This study aimed [...] Read more.
The growing intention to replace chemical food preservatives with plant-based antimicrobials that pose lower risks to human health has produced numerous studies describing the bactericidal properties of biopreservatives such as essential oils (EOs) in a variety of products, including cheese. This study aimed to perform a meta-analysis of literature data that could summarize the inactivation of Escherichia coli in cheese achieved by added EOs; and compare its inhibitory effectiveness by application method, antimicrobial concentration, and specific antimicrobials. After a systematic review, 362 observations on log reduction data and study characteristics were extracted from 16 studies. The meta-regression model suggested that pathogenic E. coli is more resistant to EO action than the non-pathogenic type (p < 0.0001), although in both cases the higher the EO dose, the greater the mean log reduction achieved (p < 0.0001). It also showed that, among the factual application methods, EOs’ incorporation in films render a steadier inactivation (p < 0.0001) than when directly applied to milk or smeared on cheese surface. Lemon balm, sage, shallot, and anise EOs showed the best inhibitory outcomes against the pathogen. The model also revealed the inadequacy of inoculating antimicrobials in cheese purposely grated for performing challenge studies, as this non-realistic application overestimates (p < 0.0001) the inhibitory effects of EOs. Full article
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