Special Issue "Essential Oils: Recent Advances in Extraction Processes, Fundamental Modeling, Chemical Analysis, and Applications"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Karim Allaf
Website
Guest Editor
LMTAI; LaSIE, UMR 7356 CNRS; La Rochelle University Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle, France
Interests: Thermodynamics: Transformations under Extreme Conditions; Modeling of Transfer Phenomena; Intensification of Unit Operations; Instant Controlled Pressure-drop DIC; Microbiological Decontamination (vegetative and spore forms); Deallergenation; Intensification of Industrial Processes and Unit Operations for highly performant industrial operations (energy consumption, environmental impact, kinetics) and high-quality attributes of the final product: Drying, Extraction, Thermochemical transformations; Biofuels: Biodiesel by in situ transesterification of microalgae and oilseeds (camelina…), Depolymerization and thermochemical hydrolysis of cellulosic agro-resources
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Colette BESOMBES
Website
Guest Editor
Assistant-Professor in Process Engineering, IUT of the University de La Rochelle, Laboratory of Engineering Science for Environment LaSIE UMR 7356 CNRS; France
Interests: essential oil extraction, valorization of food industry co-products, extraction of new functional ingredients, DIC, MFA, three-pole intermittent extraction tripolium, ISAD, decontamination

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent advances in conventional and traditional processes of essential oils (EO)extraction such as hydrodistillation, steam-distillation, hydro-diffusion, solvent, enfleurage, etc., have been recently used under various intensified routes (ultra-sound-assisted hydrodistillation, ohmic heating-assisted hydrodistillation, microwave-assisted enfleurage, DIC, etc.). Other innovative and new processes have been studied and developed on an industrial scale. They have required fundamental analysis of physical transfer phenomena to use sub or supercritical-fluid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, DIC extraction DIC-expansion-assisted hydrodistillation and steam-distillation, DIC-autovaporization, and MFA extraction. Specific advances in assessment by chromatography (SPME-GC, GC-FID, GC-MS, GC-MS/MS, etc.) were obtained. Studies, also, have included the impact of variability in varieties, cultural conditions, environmental conditions, harvesting periods, etc. Therefore, one of the major emerging aspects in essential oil extraction from several plants has been to perform multi-valorization by extracting several non-volatile bioactive compounds such as antioxidants, etc.

Prof. Karim ALLAF
Dr. Colette BESOMBES
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • essential oils
  • conventional processes
  • innovative processes
  • fundamental modelling
  • mass and heat transfers
  • intensification of unit operations
  • applications
  • food industry
  • cosmetic industry
  • perfumery
  • ambient industry
  • aromatherapy

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Efficiency of Deoxynivalenol Degradation by Essential Oils under In Vitro Conditions
Foods 2019, 8(9), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090403 - 11 Sep 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1031
Abstract
Essential oils (EOs) are complex natural products of plant origin and exhibit different desirable, e.g., antimicrobial properties. Their growth inhibition effect on the pathogenic fungi of the genus, Fusarium, which forms deoxynivalenol (DON), has been documented. DON is the most common contaminant [...] Read more.
Essential oils (EOs) are complex natural products of plant origin and exhibit different desirable, e.g., antimicrobial properties. Their growth inhibition effect on the pathogenic fungi of the genus, Fusarium, which forms deoxynivalenol (DON), has been documented. DON is the most common contaminant of grains and their products, causing strong emetic effects after their consumption. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of selected EOs to degrade DON under in vitro conditions, using various incubation terms. The impact of a different temperature, pH, incubation time, mycotoxin, and essential oil concentration was tested. The results indicate that the kind of EO influences the effectiveness of mycotoxin level reduction, and the most effective EOs were palmarosa and lemon oils. A higher reduction of DON content by EOs was achieved after 24 h of the experiment (up to 72%), at a pH range between 3 and 6 and a temperature of 20 °C. Moreover, the effect of various doses of white and pink grapefruit and palmarosa EOs (100 and 200 μL/mL) on toxin level reduction was observed. The experiment confirmed that the selected EOs may be effective in DON reduction, as previously documented in experiments with zearalenone. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Lime (Citrus aurantifolia (Christm.) Swingle) Essential Oils: Volatile Compounds, Antioxidant Capacity, and Hypolipidemic Effect
Foods 2019, 8(9), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090398 - 07 Sep 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1607
Abstract
Lime peels are mainly obtained from the byproducts of the juice manufacturing industry, which we obtained and used to extract essential oil (2.3%) in order to examine the antioxidant and hypolipidaemic effects. We identified 60 volatile compounds of lime essential oil (LEO) with [...] Read more.
Lime peels are mainly obtained from the byproducts of the juice manufacturing industry, which we obtained and used to extract essential oil (2.3%) in order to examine the antioxidant and hypolipidaemic effects. We identified 60 volatile compounds of lime essential oil (LEO) with GC/MS, of which the predominant constituents were limonene, γ-terpinene, and β-pinene. Lime essential oil was measured according to the DPPH assay and ABTS assay, with IC50 values of 2.36 mg/mL and 0.26 mg/mL, respectively. This study also explored the protective effects of LEO against lipid-induced hyperlipidemia in a rat model. Two groups of rats received oral LEO in doses of 0.74 g/100 g and 2.23 g/100 g with their diets. Eight weeks later, we found that the administration of LEO improved the serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate transaminase levels in the hyperlipidemic rats (p < 0.05). Simultaneously, the LEO improved the health of the rats in terms of obesity, atherogenic index, and fatty liver. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Headspace Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Volatile Components Analysis in Ipomoea Cairica (L.) Sweet Leaves: Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents as Green Extraction and Dilution Matrix
Foods 2019, 8(6), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8060205 - 11 Jun 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1728
Abstract
In this study, natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs) were used as both the extraction and dilution matrix in static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHS-GC-MS) for the analysis of volatile components in Ipomoea cairica (L). Sweet (ICS) leaves. Six NADESs were prepared [...] Read more.
In this study, natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs) were used as both the extraction and dilution matrix in static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHS-GC-MS) for the analysis of volatile components in Ipomoea cairica (L). Sweet (ICS) leaves. Six NADESs were prepared and the NADESs composed of choline chloride and glucose with a 1:1 molar ratio containing 15% water were preferred due to the better peak responses. A total of 77 volatiles in ICS leaves were detected and tentatively identified by mass spectral matching with the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, 2014) Mass Spectral Library and the retention index-assisted qualitative method. These 77 volatile components were mainly terpenoids, aromatics, and aliphatics. Among them, β-elemene, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, and 2, 4-di-tert-butylphenol were found to be the main components. This investigation verified that the use of NADESs is an efficient green extraction and dilution matrix of the SHS-GC-MS method for direct volatile component analysis of plant materials without extra extraction work. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Chemical Compositions of the Volatile Oils and Antibacterial Screening of Solvent Extract from Downy Lavender
Foods 2019, 8(4), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8040132 - 19 Apr 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2377
Abstract
The discovery of a new species exhibiting more effective antibacterial properties is necessary because of the demand on Lavandula species, which continues to increase in a variety of industries. Lavandula pubescens might be a good alternative, as it exhibits strong antibacterial activity. In [...] Read more.
The discovery of a new species exhibiting more effective antibacterial properties is necessary because of the demand on Lavandula species, which continues to increase in a variety of industries. Lavandula pubescens might be a good alternative, as it exhibits strong antibacterial activity. In this study, the chemical composition of the essential oils from different organs (flowers, leaves, stems, and roots) of L. pubescens was identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activities of different solvent extracts (methanol, ethanol, diethyl ether, hexane, and ethyl acetate) and different organ (flower, leaf, stem, and root) extracts of L. pubescens were evaluated. Only the ethyl acetate extracts of L. pubescens exhibited antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains tested, including Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Escherichia coli (KF 918342), Aeromonas hydrophila (KCTC 12487), E. coli (ATCC 35150), Cronobacter sakazakii (ATCC 29544), and Aeromonas salmonicida (KACC 15136). In particular, the extracts exhibited significant activity against S. haemolyticus. Ethyl acetate extract of the leaf exhibited the best activity against all bacterial strains. This study provides valuable information on the chemical compositions in essential oils and antimicrobial properties of L. pubescens. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Variations in the Volatile Compositions of Curcuma Species
Foods 2019, 8(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8020053 - 02 Feb 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1855
Abstract
Curcuma species have been cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions in Asia, Australia, and South America for culinary as well as medicinal applications. The biological activities of Curcuma have been attributed to the non-volatile curcuminoids as well as to volatile terpenoids. Curcuma essential [...] Read more.
Curcuma species have been cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions in Asia, Australia, and South America for culinary as well as medicinal applications. The biological activities of Curcuma have been attributed to the non-volatile curcuminoids as well as to volatile terpenoids. Curcuma essential oils have demonstrated a wide variety of pharmacological properties. The objective of this work was to examine the variation in the compositions of Curcuma rhizome essential oils. In this work, the volatile oils from C. longa and C. zedoaria were obtained and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chemical compositions of C. longa and C. zedoaria essential oils, including those reported in the literature, were analyzed by hierarchical cluster analysis. In addition, cluster analyses of the chemical compositions of C. aromatica and C. aeruginosa from the literature were also carried out. Curcuma longa volatiles were dominated by α-turmerone, curlone, ar-turmerone, β-sesquiphellandrene, α-zingiberene, germacrone, terpinolene, ar-curcumene, and α-phellandrene and showed four distinct chemical clusters. C. zedoaria rhizome oil contained 1,8-cineole, curzerenone/epi-curzerenone, α-copaene, camphor, β-caryophyllene, elemol, germacrone, curzerene, and β-elemene and showed two different chemical types. C. aromatica had three clearly defined clusters, and C. aeruginosa had three types. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop