Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows

A special issue of Fluids (ISSN 2311-5521).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2018) | Viewed by 15206

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Interests: rheology of complex fluids; composite nanomaterials; pickering emulsions; soft matter; thermodynamics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Simultaneous flow of two or more phases (gas, liquid, solid particles) is encountered in a large variety of situations. Some examples include: Pipelines, pipe components, mixing and separation vessels, absorption/stripping columns, flotation columns, distillation columns, packed and fluidized beds, and underground porous reservoirs. Many food, cosmetic, household, pharmaceutical, and other products of industrial significance are manufactured and sold in the form of multi-phase mixtures, such as emulsions (two-phase liquid/liquid systems), suspensions (solid particles/liquid systems), and foams (gas bubbles/liquid systems). According to some estimates, the manufacturing of nearly one-half of all the commercial products produced in a modern industrial society involves a multiphase flow process to some extent.

This Special Issue of Fluids is dedicated to the applications of non-equilibrium thermodynamics to multi-phase flows including flows of emulsions, suspensions, foams, and other complex fluids. Experimental and theoretical studies dealing with the applications of classical irreversible thermodynamics (CIT) and extended irreversible thermodynamics (EIT) to flow and rheology of multi-phasic systems are welcome. Entropy production and exergy destruction in multi-phase flows with simultaneous heat and or mass transport, with and without chemical reactions, are also welcome. The applications of non-equilibrium thermodynamics in the design and optimization of multi-phase flow processes would be considered as well.

Prof. Dr. Rajinder Pal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fluids is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Non-equilibrium thermodynamics
  • Classical irreversible thermodynamics
  • Extended irreversible thermodynamics
  • Multi-phase flow
  • Rheology
  • Dispersions
  • Entropy generation
  • Exergy destruction

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 6091 KiB  
Article
Entropy Generation and Exergy Destruction in Flow of Multiphase Dispersions of Droplets and Particles in a Polymeric Liquid
by Rajinder Pal
Fluids 2018, 3(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids3010019 - 02 Mar 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3280
Abstract
The theoretical background for entropy generation and exergy destruction in the flow of fluids is reviewed briefly. New experimental results are presented on the quantification of exergy destruction rates in flows of emulsions (oil droplets dispersed in a polymeric liquid), suspensions (solid particles [...] Read more.
The theoretical background for entropy generation and exergy destruction in the flow of fluids is reviewed briefly. New experimental results are presented on the quantification of exergy destruction rates in flows of emulsions (oil droplets dispersed in a polymeric liquid), suspensions (solid particles dispersed in a polymeric liquid), and blends of emulsions and suspensions (dispersions of oil droplets and solid particles in a polymeric liquid). A new model is proposed to estimate the exergy destruction rate, and hence power loss, in the flow of multi-phase dispersions of oil droplets, solid particles, and polymeric matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 727 KiB  
Article
Expanding the Repertoire of Dielectric Fractional Models: A Comprehensive Development and Functional Applications to Predict Metabolic Alterations in Experimentally-Inaccessible Cells or Tissues
by Francesco Farsaci, Ester Tellone, Antonio Galtieri and Silvana Ficarra
Fluids 2018, 3(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids3010009 - 25 Jan 2018
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3355
Abstract
In this paper, we present the theoretical approach developed by us in the network of dielectric fractional theories. In particular, we mention the general aspects of the non-equilibrium thermodynamics, and after an introduction to the interaction between biological tissues and electrical fields, we [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present the theoretical approach developed by us in the network of dielectric fractional theories. In particular, we mention the general aspects of the non-equilibrium thermodynamics, and after an introduction to the interaction between biological tissues and electrical fields, we highlight the role of phenomenological and state equations; therefore, we recall a general formulation on linear response theory. In Section 6, we introduce the classical fractional model. All of this is essential to show the role and the importance of fractional models in the context of thermodynamic dielectric investigations (of living or inert matter), giving a complete vision of the fractional approach. In Section 7 and Section 8, we introduce our new fractional model derived from non-equilibrium thermodynamic considerations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows)
Show Figures

Figure 1

2901 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Two-Phase Wet Steam Flow through an Asymmetric Nozzle
by Miah Md Ashraful Alam, Manabu Takao and Toshiaki Setoguchi
Fluids 2017, 2(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids2040063 - 15 Nov 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4940
Abstract
The present study reported of the numerical investigation of a high-speed wet steam flow through an asymmetric nozzle. The spontaneous non-equilibrium homogeneous condensation of wet steam was numerically modeled based on the classical nucleation theory and droplet growth rate equation combined with the [...] Read more.
The present study reported of the numerical investigation of a high-speed wet steam flow through an asymmetric nozzle. The spontaneous non-equilibrium homogeneous condensation of wet steam was numerically modeled based on the classical nucleation theory and droplet growth rate equation combined with the field conservations within the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code of ANSYS Fluent 13.0. The equations describing droplet formations and interphase change were solved sequentially after solving the main flow conservation equations. The calculations were carried out assuming the flow two-dimensional, compressible, turbulent, and viscous. The SST k-ω model was used for modeling the turbulence within an unstructured mesh solver. The validation of numerical model was accomplished, and the results showed a good agreement between the numerical simulation and experimental data. The effect of spontaneous non-equilibrium condensation on the jet and shock structures was revealed, and the condensation shown a great influence on the jet structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows)
Show Figures

Figure 1

256 KiB  
Article
A New Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Fractional Visco-Inelastic Model to Predict Experimentally Inaccessible Processes and Investigate Pathophysiological Cellular Structures
by Francesco Farsaci, Silvana Ficarra, Antonio Galtieri and Ester Tellone
Fluids 2017, 2(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids2040059 - 01 Nov 2017
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2861
Abstract
After remarking on non-equilibrium thermodynamics with internal variables, this paper highlights the importance of these variables to the study of biological systems. Internal variables can provide a more detailed description of biological processes that occur inside cells, tissues and organs. In order to [...] Read more.
After remarking on non-equilibrium thermodynamics with internal variables, this paper highlights the importance of these variables to the study of biological systems. Internal variables can provide a more detailed description of biological processes that occur inside cells, tissues and organs. In order to introduce a fractional model on a visco-inelastic medium based on Kluitenberg’s non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the origin of the complex dynamic modulus is shown by means of linear response theory. This research recalls our previous work to develop an ultrasound wave technique that allows us to investigate biological systems, and introduces the fractional visco-inelastic model and relative generalized relaxation time, to show that it is possible to obtain the Cole–Cole model in a particular case. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows)
Back to TopTop