Modelling and Observation of Water Waves

A special issue of Fluids (ISSN 2311-5521). This special issue belongs to the section "Mathematical and Computational Fluid Mechanics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 3763

Special Issue Editors


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School of Mathematics, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
Interests: waves; wave modelling; nonlinear waves; wave-ice interaction
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Department of Infrastructure Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Interests: physical oceanography; coastal engineering; waves; wave modeling; marine data analysis

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Department of Ocean Engineering and Naval Architecture, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302, India
Interests: waves; wave structure interactions; wave energy

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Department of Mechanical Engineering and Product Design Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122, Australia
Interests: waves; ocean; bubbles; ship motion; RAOs

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Product Design Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122, Australia
Interests: bubble acoustics; fluid dynamics; ocean wave-power; wave modelling and wave-induced processes; applied mathematics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water waves are commonly used as examples of waves but “have all the complications that waves can have” as Prof. Richard Feynman pointed out in his Lectures on Physics. Starting from the mid-19th century, fundamental wave theories for deep and shallow waters were formulated, providing a mathematical framework for applications in physics and engineering. Nevertheless, despite the long history of wave modeling, physical modeling and field observations still provide much needed insight into the understanding of wave phenomena and future model developments.

This Special Issue of Fluids collects reviews and original research on recent developments in the modeling (numerical and physical) and observation of water wave phenomena. Specific topics may include wave breaking, nonlinear wave propagation, spectral wave modeling, wave turbulence, rogue waves, solitary waves, wave–current interaction, wave–structure interaction, wave impact force on structures, and wave energy conversion.

Dr. Alberto Alberello
Dr. Marzieh H. Derkani
Dr. Swapnadip De Chowdhury
Dr. Filippo Nelli
Prof. Dr. Richard Manasseh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • water waves
  • surface waves
  • ocean waves
  • ocean modeling
  • CFD

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1344 KiB  
Article
Winter Ice Dynamics in a Semi-Closed Ice-Covered Sea: Numerical Simulations and Satellite Data
by Ilya Chernov, Alexey Tolstikov, Vyacheslav Baklagin and Nikolay Iakovlev
Fluids 2022, 7(10), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids7100324 - 11 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1481
Abstract
The White Sea is a small shallow sea covered by ice in winter. There are very few numerical models of this sea. For the ice-free sea, much data has been collected, but for winter only a small amount (satellite data only). We use [...] Read more.
The White Sea is a small shallow sea covered by ice in winter. There are very few numerical models of this sea. For the ice-free sea, much data has been collected, but for winter only a small amount (satellite data only). We use our finite-element numerical model Jasmine and satellite data to trace the ice advection and exchange between parts of the White Sea. The aim of the investigation is to adjust the model to adequately reproduce the White Sea ice dynamics. By comparing satellite data on sea-ice concentration with the model prediction, we show that the model describes sea-ice dynamics well, and use it to estimate ice flow from bays to the middle part of the sea and ice exchange through the narrow strait. Ice exchange between neighbouring parts of the sea is shown to be intensive, with large dispersion compared to the time-mean, and bays are shown to be ice producers, while the Gorlo straight is shown to accept ice. We demonstrate that the model is a tool that can be used to better understand the winter regime of the sea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling and Observation of Water Waves)
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16 pages, 2153 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation on Wave-Overtopping at a Double-Dike Defence Structure in Response to Climate Change-Induced Sea Level Rise
by Yueyuan Jin, Weizhi Wang, Arun Kamath and Hans Bihs
Fluids 2022, 7(9), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids7090295 - 8 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1521
Abstract
Climate change has tremendous economic and environmental impacts on coastal areas and threatens human lives and livelihoods in generally densely populated coastal communities. Climate change-induced sea level rise (SLR) is a particular risk factor for coastal and low-lying areas. Therefore, the study on [...] Read more.
Climate change has tremendous economic and environmental impacts on coastal areas and threatens human lives and livelihoods in generally densely populated coastal communities. Climate change-induced sea level rise (SLR) is a particular risk factor for coastal and low-lying areas. Therefore, the study on the overtopping of coastal structures in a changing climate is a critical topic for coastal protection and adaptation. As most coastal areas have shallow water conditions, the open-source nonhydrostatic shallow water equation-based model REEF3D::SFLOW is applied for the numerical investigation of overtopping over a coastal structure. Validation is performed by comparing the numerical estimations with the existing experiment presented by previous studies. The time evolution of overtopping can be predicted well by the numerical model in comparison to the experimental data. The computational speed is seen to be approximately 1500 times as fast as the Navier–Stokes equation-based counterparts. Thereafter, a comprehensive study on overtopping that takes into account different climate scenarios is presented with regard to the chosen coastal structure; this offers insights for future adaptations. The numerical approach provides an efficient alternative for the coastal protection structure adaptations in the changing climate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling and Observation of Water Waves)
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