Special Issue "Optical Fiber Communications"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Mário F. S. Ferreira

Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, Aveiro 3810-193, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +351-23-437-0356
Fax: +351-23-442-4965
Interests: modeling and characterization of multi-section semiconductor lasers for coherent systems; quantum well lasers; optical fiber amplifiers and lasers; soliton propagation; nanophotonics; optical sensors; polarization and nonlinear effects in optical fibers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optical fiber communication systems have been deployed worldwide since 1980, and have revolutionized the field of telecommunications. The capacity of such systems has been continuously increasing. Over the last three decades, the aggregate bit-rate of optical transmission systems based on single-mode fiber (SMF) has increased by a factor of four orders of magnitude by means of multiplexing techniques that use time, wavelength, and polarization as a degree of freedom to encode information. In addition to multiplexing, coherent transmission techniques also allow to increase the aggregate bit-rate of optical communications systems by exploiting both the phase and the amplitude of the light to carry information. As today’s wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) coherent optical communication has already taken advantage of all degrees off freedom of a lightwave in a single-mode fiber, further multiplicative growth must explore new degrees of freedom that do not exist in SMFs. In this context, space-division multiplexing (SDM), including mode-division multiplexing (MDM) using multimode fibers (MMFs) or few-mode fibers (FMFs) and/or core multiplexing using multicore fibers (MCFs), has attracted a great deal of attention in the last few years.

This Special Issue covers a large scope of research in the area of optical fiber communications, and solicits contributions in, but not limited to:

  • Multichannel systems
  • WDM components
  • Space-division multiplexing
  • Polarization-mode dispersion
  • Multicore fibers
  • Few-mode fibers
  • Coherent optical communications
  • Optical transmitters
  • Optical receivers
  • Optical amplifiers
  • Dispersion-compensating fibers
  • Dispersion-managed systems
  • Pseudo-linear lightwave systems
  • Soliton transmission systems
  • Optical signal processing
  • Nonlinear effects

Prof. Mário Ferreira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Phase-Separated Alumina–Silica Glass-Based Erbium-Doped Fibers for Optical Amplifier: Material and Optical Characterization along with Amplification Properties
Fibers 2018, 6(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6030067
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 10 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 September 2018 / Published: 17 September 2018
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Abstract
In this paper, we present phase-separated alumina–silica glass-based Er3+-doped optical fibers made by a modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process in combination with a solution doping (SD) technique. The fibers exhibited better optical performance than other silica-based host glasses—both in terms
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we present phase-separated alumina–silica glass-based Er3+-doped optical fibers made by a modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process in combination with a solution doping (SD) technique. The fibers exhibited better optical performance than other silica-based host glasses—both in terms of spectral broadening and flattening of the gain spectra in the C band (1530–1560 nm) region—as well as an improved lifetime. These phase-separated erbium-doped fibers (EDF) promoted longer Er–O bond lengths and also hexa- and penta-coordinated Al3+ ions instead of the fourfold coordination found in non-phase-separated EDF. It was observed that the higher coordination numbers of Er3+ and Al3+ ions in phase-separated glass hosts led to more homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening, resulting in better flatness of the gain spectrum with 1.2 dB more gain compared to the non-phase-separated EDF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Communications)
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Open AccessArticle Photon-Pair Sources Based on Intermodal Four-Wave Mixing in Few-Mode Fibers
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020032
Received: 21 March 2018 / Revised: 26 April 2018 / Accepted: 7 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
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Abstract
Four-wave mixing in optical fibers has been proven to have many applications within processing of classical optical signals. In addition, recent developments in multimode fibers have made it possible to achieve the necessary phase-matching for efficient four-wave mixing over a very wide bandwidth.
[...] Read more.
Four-wave mixing in optical fibers has been proven to have many applications within processing of classical optical signals. In addition, recent developments in multimode fibers have made it possible to achieve the necessary phase-matching for efficient four-wave mixing over a very wide bandwidth. Thus, the combination of multimode fiber optics and four-wave mixing is very attractive for various applications. This is especially the case for applications in quantum communication, for example in photon-pair generation. This is the subject of this work, where we discuss the impact of fluctuations in core radius on the quality of the heralded single-photon states and demonstrate experimental results of intermodal spontaneous four-wave mixing for photon-pair generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Communications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview A Brief Review of New Fiber Microsphere Geometries
Fibers 2018, 6(3), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6030048
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 11 July 2018
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Abstract
A brief review of new fiber microsphere geometries is presented. Simple microspheres working as Fabry–Perot cavities are interrogated in reflection and in transmission. Two microspheres were also spliced together, and subjected to different physical parameters. These structures are an alternative solution for load
[...] Read more.
A brief review of new fiber microsphere geometries is presented. Simple microspheres working as Fabry–Perot cavities are interrogated in reflection and in transmission. Two microspheres were also spliced together, and subjected to different physical parameters. These structures are an alternative solution for load measurement and, when read in transmission, it is also possible to apply strain. Moreover, the structure is capable of being used under extreme ambient temperatures up to 900 °C. Random signal in cleaved microspheres was demonstrated with the possibility of using it for random laser or sensing applications. All this work was developed at the Centre for Applied Photonics, INESC TEC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Communications)
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Open AccessReview Advances on Polymer Optical Fiber Gratings Using a KrF Pulsed Laser System Operating at 248 nm
Fibers 2018, 6(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6010013
Received: 8 January 2018 / Revised: 26 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (7356 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents the achievements and progress made on the polymer optical fiber (POF) gratings inscription in different types of Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and long period gratings (LPGs). Since the first demonstration of POFBGs in 1999, significant progress has been made where
[...] Read more.
This paper presents the achievements and progress made on the polymer optical fiber (POF) gratings inscription in different types of Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) and long period gratings (LPGs). Since the first demonstration of POFBGs in 1999, significant progress has been made where the inscription times that were higher than 1 h have been reduced to 15 ns with the application of the krypton fluoride (KrF) pulsed laser operating at 248 nm and thermal treatments such as the pre-annealing of fibers. In addition, the application of dopants such as benzyl dimethyl ketal (BDK) has provided a significant decrease of the fiber inscription time. Furthermore, such improvements lead to the possibility of inscribing POF gratings in 850 nm and 600 nm, instead of only the 1550 nm region. The progress on the inscription of different types of polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs) such as chirped POFBGs and phase-shifted POFBGs are also reported in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Communications)
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