Special Issue "Cementitious Composites Reinforced with Recycled and Natural Fibers: Experimental Results and Numerical Modelling 2019"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joaquim António Oliveira de Barros

ISISE, Institute of Science and Innovation for Bio-Sustainability (IB-S), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +351 253 510 747
Interests: structural analysis and design; fiber-reinforced composites; sustainable materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Enzo Martinelli

Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Pallo II, 132 84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: structural analysis and design; fiber-reinforced composites; sustainable materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of “green” constituents is emerging as a challenge for enhancing sustainability in concrete production. In this context, the use of recycled fibers is one of the most promising prospects.

This Special Issue aims to collect contributions on the most recent advances on the physical and mechanical characterisation of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites (FRCC) with either Recycled Fibers (RFs) or Natural Fibers (NFs). Specifically, it includes (without being limited to) studies on FRCC produced with either Recycled Steel Fibers (RSFs) obtained from waste tires or NFs obtained from plant, such as sisal, hemp, flax, etc. However, research on types of fibers other than the two aforemenioned types are also of interest as they may shed light on more innovative and less explored possibilities in FRCCs towards a more sustainable built environment.

Further, although experimental results are certainly relevant in gaining empirical evidence about the technical feasibility of using RFs and NFs in cementitious composites and their performance with respect to purposely produced “industrial” fibers, theoretical contributions intended at capturing the specific features of fibers and their interactions with cement-matrices are also welcome.

We hope this Special Issue will provide readers with a selection of papers outlining the current state of knowledge on the use of RFs and NFs in cementitous composites. Specifically, the following aspects may be addressed:

  1. Technology of production and material properties;
  2. Applications for structural and functional purposes;
  3. Design and numerical approaches.

 

Prof. Dr. Joaquim Antonio Oliveira de Barros
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Enzo Martinelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fiber-reinforced cementitious composites
  • Recycled fibers
  • Natural fibers
  • Bond
  • Post-cracking response
  • Experimental tests
  • Theoretical models

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of an Impregnation Treatment on the Morphology and Mechanical Behaviour of Flax Yarns Embedded in Hydraulic Lime Mortar
Fibers 2019, 7(4), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib7040030
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 27 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
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Abstract
The increasing attention toward environmental aspects has led, also in the sector of construction materials, to the need for developing more eco-friendly solutions. Among several options, the employment of low energy raw materials appears as an efficient solution intended to enhance the sustainability [...] Read more.
The increasing attention toward environmental aspects has led, also in the sector of construction materials, to the need for developing more eco-friendly solutions. Among several options, the employment of low energy raw materials appears as an efficient solution intended to enhance the sustainability of building structures. One of the applications moving in this direction is the use of plant fibers as a reinforcement in cement-based composites, hence named as natural textile reinforced mortar (NTRM) composites. Although representing a promising technique, there are still several open issues concerning the variability of plant fibers properties, the durability, and the mechanical compatibility with the mortar. This study aims at investigating the influence of an impregnation process on the thread’s morphology and on the mechanical response. Therefore, the geometry of dry and impregnated flax threads is identified by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images analysis, and their mechanical response in tension is assessed. In addition, the fibers-to-mortar bond behavior is investigated by means of pull-out tests. The proposed results show that the impregnation procedure employed, although not improving the fibers-to matrix bond, leads to a standardisation of the threads morphology and reduces the thread’s deformability in tension, and paves the way for further investigations on a larger scale. Full article
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