Special Issue "Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sushanta Ghoshal
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Technical Physics II/Polymer Physics, Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Ilmenau University of Technology, PO Box 10 05 65, D-98684 Ilmenau, Germany
Interests: innovative materials for fiber applications; nanocomposites; structure–properties relationship; nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); polymer films; biocomposites; polymer characterizations; high performance fibers and their composites; industrial fibers
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon fiber is one of the strongest and most lightweight materials available on the market today. Because of these excellent properties, carbon fiber based composites are often used in aerospace and aviation, automobile, civil engineering, military, sports car and other competitive sport materials manufacturing applications. However, limitations like higher price and recyclability still to be resolved for the expansion of potential applications of such composites. On-going extensive research on carbon fiber based composites, thus, plays a key role for the continuous development for newer applications.

This Special Issue is intended to highlight a number of high-quality up-to-date research contributions on carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The topics of the Special Issue includes but not limited to: Different types of carbon fibers reinforced composites, composite processing and characterizations, structure-properties relationship, current challenges in the field of composites and their future applications.

It is my great pleasure to invite you to submit a paper (full papers, communications, feature articles, and reviews) to the Special Issue, "Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites".  This Special Issue will cover the latest experimental, theoretical, and computational research approaches on this important topic and I look forward to receiving your submissions.

Dr. Sushanta Ghoshal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbon fibers processing and characterizations
  • Carbon fiber reinforced composites
  • Properties
  • Characterizations
  • New processing methods
  • Structure-properties relationship
  • Applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Pitch-Based Short Carbon Fibers on the Workability, Unit Weight, and Air Content of Mortar Composite
Fibers 2018, 6(3), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6030063 - 30 Aug 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2283
Abstract
Pitch is a viscoelastic polymer material consisting of aromatic hydrocarbons. It is used to produce carbon fibers with sheet-like crystal structures. The aim of the work presented in this paper was to evaluate the effects of pitch-based short carbon fibers on the workability, [...] Read more.
Pitch is a viscoelastic polymer material consisting of aromatic hydrocarbons. It is used to produce carbon fibers with sheet-like crystal structures. The aim of the work presented in this paper was to evaluate the effects of pitch-based short carbon fibers on the workability, unit weight, and air content of freshly mixed mortar composite. Experimental investigation was carried out on five different types of mortar composite, including a control mortar. Four mortar composites were prepared including pitch-based short carbon fibers with 1–4% volume contents. The fresh mortar composites were tested to determine their slump, inverted slump cone flow (flow time, mass flow, and volume flow), unit weight, and air content. In addition, the correlation between the slump and flow time of various mortar composites was determined. It was found that the slump decreased with the increasing volume content of carbon fibers. The flow time of mortar composite increased, and therefore its mass flow and volume flow decreased with a greater volume content of carbon fibers. The slump was strongly correlated with the flow time, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9782. Furthermore, the unit weight of the fresh mortar composite decreased due to the incorporation of carbon fibers. However, amongst the different carbon fiber reinforced mortar composites, the mortar with 3% fiber volume content provided the highest unit weight. The air content results were consistent with the unit weight results. The change in air content of various mortar composites followed a trend reciprocal to that of unit weights. When the overall effects of carbon fibers were compared, it was observed that the fiber volume content higher than 3% resulted in a significantly low workability and provided a much lower unit weight with greater entrapped air content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites)
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Open AccessFeature PaperEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Effect of Filler Orientation on the Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Fiber/PMMA Composites
Fibers 2018, 6(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6010003 - 01 Jan 2018
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4645
Abstract
The electrical conductivity of extruded carbon fiber (CF)/Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) composites with controlled CF aspect ratio and filler fractions ranging from 0 to 50 vol. % has been investigated and analyzed. The composites were extruded through a capillary rheometer, utilizing either 1-mm or 3-mm [...] Read more.
The electrical conductivity of extruded carbon fiber (CF)/Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) composites with controlled CF aspect ratio and filler fractions ranging from 0 to 50 vol. % has been investigated and analyzed. The composites were extruded through a capillary rheometer, utilizing either 1-mm or 3-mm diameter extrusion dies, resulting in cylindrical composite filaments of two different diameters. Since the average CF orientation becomes more aligned with the extrusion flow when the diameter of the extrusion dies decreases, the relationship between conductivity and average fiber orientation could therefore be examined. The room temperature conductivities of the extruded filaments as a function of CF fractions were fitted to the McLachlan general effective medium (GEM) equation and the percolation thresholds were determined to 20.0 ± 2.5 vol. % and 32.0 ± 5.9 vol. % for the 3-mm (with CFs oriented less) and 1-mm (with CFs oriented more) filaments, respectively. It turned out that the oriented CFs in the composite shift the percolation threshold to a higher value, however, the conductivity above the percolation threshold is higher for composites with oriented CFs. A novel approach based on the Balberg excluded volume theory was proposed to explain this counterintuitive phenomenon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Influence of Cutting Temperature on the Tensile Strength of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer
Fibers 2017, 5(4), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib5040046 - 15 Dec 2017
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3895
Abstract
Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) have seen a significant increase in use over the years thanks to their specific properties. Despite continuous improvements in the production methods of laminated parts, a trimming operation is still necessary to achieve the functional dimensions required by engineering [...] Read more.
Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) have seen a significant increase in use over the years thanks to their specific properties. Despite continuous improvements in the production methods of laminated parts, a trimming operation is still necessary to achieve the functional dimensions required by engineering specifications. Laminates made of carbon fibers are very abrasive and cause rapid tool wear, and require high cutting temperatures. This creates damage to the epoxy matrix, whose glass-transition temperature is often recognized to be about 180 °C. This study aims to highlight the influence of the cutting temperature generated by tool wear on the surface finish and mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests. Trimming operations were performed on a quasi-isotropic 24-ply carbon/epoxy laminate, of 3.6 mm thickness, with a 6 flutes diamond-coated (CVD) cutter. The test specimens of 6 mm and 12 mm wide were obtained by trimming. The reduced width of the coupons allowed amplification of the effect of defects on the measured properties by increasing the proportion of coupon cross-section occupied by the defects. A new tool and a tool in an advanced state of wear were used to generate different cutting temperatures. Results showed a cutting temperature of 300 °C for the new tool and 475 °C for the worn tool. The analysis revealed that the specimens machined with the new tool have no thermal damage and the cut is clean. The plies oriented at −45° presented the worst surface finish according to the failure mode of the fiber. For the worn tool, the surface was degraded and the matrix was carbonized. After cutting, observations showed a degraded resin spread on the machined surface, which reduced the surface roughness and hid the cutting defects. In support of these observations, the tensile tests showed no variation of the mechanical properties for the 12 mm-wide specimens, but did show a 10% loss in mechanical properties for the 6 mm-wide specimens. These results suggest that the thermal defects caused by tool wear affect tensile properties, but only from a certain coupon width below which the machining defects increase their influence on the properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites)
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