Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Microalgae

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Metabolism, Physiology & Genetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 2486

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infectious Microbiology, The Stephan Angeloff Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 26 Acad. G. Bonchev Str., 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: pathogenic bacteria; food-borne zoonozes; virulence factors; bacteria–host relationships; infectious immunology; molecular biology; ecology of pathogens; new antibacterial agents; antimicrobial resistance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Department of Infectious Microbiology, The Stephan Angeloff Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: microbiota of small mammals; cytotoxicity; molecular biology; biochemistry; cyanobacteria; eukaryotic microalgae

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacteria (photosynthetic Gram-negative prokaryotes) and eukaryotic microalgae not only have similar physiological and ecological characteristics, but also have remarkable biotechnological potential. From biological and biotechnological points of view, scientists have worked hard to gain insight into the phenotypic peculiarities and genomic characteristics of cyanobacteria and microalgae, elucidating the key aspects and principles of their growth and metabolism. Moreover, the biodiversity of cyanobacteria and microalgae represents an unexplored source of valuable metabolites with potential industrial applications. Numerous natural compounds with diverse structures and biological roles, including primary metabolites (amino acids, fatty acids, lipids, etc.) and secondary metabolites (carotenoids, vitamins, glycerol, etc.), have been identified and described, and an array of novel secondary metabolites, including biologically active compounds with antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer activities, have been characterized. Growing in diverse habitats and requiring no arable land or clean water, eukaryotic microalgae have distinct advantages for mass culturing. They represent sustainable alternatives for biotechnological production processes as their cultivation can be driven by light and freely available CO2 as a carbon source. One of the most promising applications, from a biotechnological point of view, is the utilization of CO2 from flue and industrial gases as a substrate for the synthesis of bioenergetic compound precursors in biofuel production, as well as in the production of alcohols and isoprenoids, fatty acid derivatives, biopolymers, recombinant proteins, and single-cell proteins, using modern tools for genetic engineering. In the field of agriculture, potent N2-fixing cyanobacteria could be exploited as bio-factories to produce value-added compounds for biofertilizer, sustainable feedstocks, etc. An important trend in algology is represented by complex studies that employ the integral biorefinery concept to determine the financial viability of challenging new ideas and technologies based on the culturing of cyanobacteria and microalgae, and the transfer and exploration of these technologies to an industrial scale.

Prof. Dr. Hristo Najdenski
Guest Editor

Dr. Yana E. Ilieva
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cyanobacteria
  • eukaryotic microalgae
  • biodiversity
  • natural compounds
  • secondary metabolites
 

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 1628 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant and Anticancer Potential of Extracellular Polysaccharide from Porphyridium aerugineum (Rhodophyta)
by Juliana G. Ivanova, Tanya S. Toshkova-Yotova, Reneta A. Toshkova, Veronika R. Deleva, Ani K. Georgieva and Liliana G. Gigova
Fermentation 2024, 10(5), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation10050259 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 530
Abstract
Porphyridium aerugineum is a unicellular freshwater red microalga that synthesizes and secretes into the culture medium an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). In this study, algal growth and polysaccharide production, as well as the antioxidant capacity and antitumor effect of Porphyridium aerugineum EPS (PaEPS), were [...] Read more.
Porphyridium aerugineum is a unicellular freshwater red microalga that synthesizes and secretes into the culture medium an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). In this study, algal growth and polysaccharide production, as well as the antioxidant capacity and antitumor effect of Porphyridium aerugineum EPS (PaEPS), were investigated. Cultivation of the microalgae was carried out in a photobioreactor under controlled conditions. Algal growth and the amount of EPS were monitored daily. The accumulated polysaccharide was extracted and lyophilized. At the end of cultivation, the concentration of microalgal biomass and PaEPS reached 3.3 and 1.2 g L−1, respectively. To examine the antioxidant capacity of PaEPS, FRAP and ABTS assays were performed. The cytotoxic activity of PaEPS was evaluated on the tumor cell lines MCF-7 (breast cancer) and HeLa (cervical adenocarcinoma) and on BJ (a non-tumor human skin fibroblast cell line), using MTT assay. The results obtained indicated that P. aerugineum polysaccharide exhibited a high ABTS radical-scavenging activity reaching up to 55%. The cytotoxic effect was best expressed in MCF-7 cells treated for 72 h with 1000 µg/mL PaEPS, where tumor cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 70%. Importantly, the PaEPS treatments did not significantly affect the viability of BJ cells. These findings promote the biotechnological production of P. aerugineum extracellular polysaccharide and reveal its potential as an anticancer and antioxidant agent for future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Microalgae)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 1443 KiB  
Article
Life Cycle Assessment of Exopolysaccharides and Phycocyanin Production with Arthrospira platensis
by Isadora Cogo Badan, Sun-Hwa Jung, Rickwinder Singh, Vivekanand Vivekanand, Justus Knappert, Cornelia Rauh and Christoph Lindenberger
Fermentation 2024, 10(3), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation10030163 - 13 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1641
Abstract
In the pursuit of sustainable solutions for contemporary environmental challenges arising from the increasing global demand for energy, this study delves into the potential of cyanobacteria, specifically Arthrospira platensis (commonly known as “spirulina”), as a versatile resource. Employing a life cycle assessment (LCA) [...] Read more.
In the pursuit of sustainable solutions for contemporary environmental challenges arising from the increasing global demand for energy, this study delves into the potential of cyanobacteria, specifically Arthrospira platensis (commonly known as “spirulina”), as a versatile resource. Employing a life cycle assessment (LCA) in accordance with the ISO 14044:2006 standard and employing both midpoint and endpoint indicators, the study comprehensively evaluates environmental impacts. The research explored a range of scenarios, specifically investigating variations in light intensity and harvesting volume. These investigations were carried out using a pilot-scale photobioreactor, specifically an airlift reactor system featuring a horizontal tubular downcomer. The primary focus is on extracting valuable compounds, namely exopolysaccharides and phycocyanin. It emphasized the extraction of value-added products and strategic integration with a biogas plant for process heat, contributing to developing a sustainable supply network and offering insights into environmentally conscious algae cultivation practices with implications for renewable energy and the production of valuable products. The results emphasize the project’s potential economic feasibility with minimal energy impact from by-product extraction. The environmental assessment identifies marine ecotoxicity and fossil resource depletion as principal impacts, predominantly influenced by upstreaming and harvesting stages. After conducting comparisons across various scenarios, it was found that cultivations under higher light intensities have a lower environmental impact than cultivations with low light supply. However, regardless of light intensity, processes with shorter harvesting cycles tend to have a smaller environmental impact compared to processes with longer harvesting cycles. Overall, this research contributes a nuanced and realistic perspective, fostering informed decision-making in sustainable algae cultivation practices, with implications for renewable energy and valuable compound production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Microalgae)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop