Polycomb and Trithorax Group of Proteins in Development and Disease 2.0

A special issue of Epigenomes (ISSN 2075-4655).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019) | Viewed by 13278

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Dr. Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: cancer epigenetics; polycomb; chromatin remodeling; gene silencing; cellular differentiation; RNA modifications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cellular identity and organism development are mediated by two large groups of proteins: the Polycomb group (PcG), which represses transcription, and the Trithorax group (TrxG), which activates transcription. The tight regulation and coordination of both protein families is fundamental to properly coordinate cellular programs that will enable development and differentiation. Deregulation of proteins belonging to PcG or TrxG families leads to a wide spectrum of developmental disorders and diseases, including cancer.
This Special Issue is focused on the function of PcG and TrxG complexes, both in development and disease. We will consider reviews, research, or method manuscripts of exceptional interest on the following topics:
- PcG or TrxG proteins in the development of any model organism;
- The role of PcG or TrxG components in disease;
- The role of PcG or TrxG in gene regulation and chromatin architecture.

Dr. Luciano Di Croce
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Epigenomes is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

24 pages, 1082 KiB  
Review
The Dynamic Partnership of Polycomb and Trithorax in Brain Development and Diseases
by Janise N. Kuehner and Bing Yao
Epigenomes 2019, 3(3), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/epigenomes3030017 - 21 Aug 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6324
Abstract
Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA and histone modifications, are pivotal for normal brain development and functions by modulating spatial and temporal gene expression. Dysregulation of the epigenetic machinery can serve as a causal role in numerous brain disorders. Proper mammalian brain development and functions [...] Read more.
Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA and histone modifications, are pivotal for normal brain development and functions by modulating spatial and temporal gene expression. Dysregulation of the epigenetic machinery can serve as a causal role in numerous brain disorders. Proper mammalian brain development and functions depend on the precise expression of neuronal-specific genes, transcription factors and epigenetic modifications. Antagonistic polycomb and trithorax proteins form multimeric complexes and play important roles in these processes by epigenetically controlling gene repression or activation through various molecular mechanisms. Aberrant expression or disruption of either protein group can contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focus on the current progress of Polycomb and Trithorax complexes in brain development and disease, and provides a future outlook of the field. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

38 pages, 2093 KiB  
Review
Polycomb Assemblies Multitask to Regulate Transcription
by Miguel Vidal
Epigenomes 2019, 3(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/epigenomes3020012 - 20 Jun 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 6498
Abstract
The Polycomb system is made of an evolutionary ancient group of proteins, present throughout plants and animals. Known initially from developmental studies with the fly Drosophila melanogaster, they were associated with stable sustainment of gene repression and maintenance of cell identity. Acting [...] Read more.
The Polycomb system is made of an evolutionary ancient group of proteins, present throughout plants and animals. Known initially from developmental studies with the fly Drosophila melanogaster, they were associated with stable sustainment of gene repression and maintenance of cell identity. Acting as multiprotein assemblies with an ability to modify chromatin, through chemical additions to histones and organization of topological domains, they have been involved subsequently in control of developmental transitions and in cell homeostasis. Recent work has unveiled an association of Polycomb components with transcriptionally active loci and the promotion of gene expression, in clear contrast with conventional recognition as repressors. Focusing on mammalian models, I review here advances concerning roles in transcriptional control. Among new findings highlighted is the regulation of their catalytic properties, recruiting to targets, and activities in chromatin organization and compartmentalization. The need for a more integrated approach to the study of the Polycomb system, given its fundamental complexity and its adaptation to cell context, is discussed. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop