Special Issue "Pollution Prevention/Environmental Sustainability for Industry"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 17 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Bruce Dvorak
Website
Guest Editor
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, USA
Interests: pollution prevention and cleaner production for industry; life cycle assessment of industrial processes; water/wastewater treatment; barriers to implementation of pollution prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It has been 30 years since in the United States, the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 focused attention on reducing pollution through cost-effective changes in production, operation, and raw materials use. The pollution prevention approach was novel in focusing on increasing the efficiency of a process and reducing the amount of pollution generated at its source. Worldwide, industrial organizations embraced cleaner production approaches that result in reducing pollution at the source. Since that time, the industry has successfully applied the three pillars of sustainability—economic, environmental, and social—to minimize waste and emissions, reduce negative social impacts, improve profitability, and gain a competitive edge. This Special Issue seeks original, unpublished papers that describe recent advances in improving the sustainability of industrial operations. 

Papers may relate to technical topics associated with pollution prevention and sustainability in industry such as (i) novel methods for the analysis of material and energy flows, (ii) innovations for material substitution and for increasing the life of auxiliary materials and process liquids, (iii) improvements for control and automation, (iv) novel reuse of wastes, (v) innovative processes and technologies, (vi) energy efficiency, (vii) applications of life cycle assessment, (viii) assessment of barriers to implementation within industry, (ix) new business tools, (x) case studies of successful programs that result in for pollution prevention/sustainability implementation, and (xi) innovative educational approaches. We especially invite papers that take an interdisciplinary approach to considering the social and economic aspects of successful application of pollution prevention and sustainability in industry.

Prof. Dr. Bruce Dvorak
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pollution prevention and cleaner production
  • industrial energy efficiency
  • sustainability assessments of industry
  • education for industrial sustainability
  • corporate sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Decontaminating Terrestrial Oil Spills: A Comparative Assessment of Dog Fur, Human Hair, Peat Moss and Polypropylene Sorbents
Environments 2020, 7(7), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7070052 (registering DOI) - 08 Jul 2020
Abstract
Terrestrial oil spills have severe and continuing consequences for human communities and the natural environment. Sorbent materials are considered to be a first line of defense method for directly extracting oil from spills and preventing further contaminant spread, but little is known on [...] Read more.
Terrestrial oil spills have severe and continuing consequences for human communities and the natural environment. Sorbent materials are considered to be a first line of defense method for directly extracting oil from spills and preventing further contaminant spread, but little is known on the performance of sorbent products in terrestrial environments. Dog fur and human hair sorbent products were compared to peat moss and polypropylene sorbent to examine their relative effectiveness in adsorbing crude oil from different terrestrial surfaces. Crude oil spills were simulated using standardized microcosm experiments, and contaminant adsorbency was measured as percentage of crude oil removed from the original spilled quantity. Sustainable-origin absorbents made from dog fur and human hair were equally effective to polypropylene in extracting crude oil from non- and semi-porous land surfaces, with recycled dog fur products and loose-form hair showing a slight advantage over other sorbent types. In a sandy terrestrial environment, polypropylene sorbent was significantly better at adsorbing spilled crude oil than all other tested products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Prevention/Environmental Sustainability for Industry)
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Open AccessArticle
Centralized and Decentralized Recycle Policy with Transboundary Pollution
Environments 2020, 7(5), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7050040 - 24 May 2020
Abstract
In this study, under the existence of unilateral cross-border environmental pollution in two regions, a complete information dynamic game theory is constructed to discuss the environmental policy (recycling fee and treatment subsidy) formulation of the central government by two local governments. As a [...] Read more.
In this study, under the existence of unilateral cross-border environmental pollution in two regions, a complete information dynamic game theory is constructed to discuss the environmental policy (recycling fee and treatment subsidy) formulation of the central government by two local governments. As a result, it was found that the spillover effect will reduce the level of social welfare. At the same time, the intervention of the central government and the adoption of policies tailored to local conditions will be conducive to the improvement of social welfare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Prevention/Environmental Sustainability for Industry)
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