Special Issue "Anthropogenic Beach Litter and Impact on Habitats"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Loris Pietrelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ENEA, Environmental Dpt, Rome, Italy
Interests: environment and sustainable development; waste treatment; polymers; environmental monitoring; ecology; ornithology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Patrizia Menegoni
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome, Italy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last century, beaches in marine or freshwater ecosystems have been subjected to diverse interests not always compatible with environmental protection and conservation. Consequently, the increase in anthropogenic litter is responsible not only for aesthetic degradation but, in particular, for extremely severe environmental damage everywhere: for example, the impact of plastic is a pandemic phenomenon involving the whole biosphere. In fact, not only birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates are involved, but also the vegetation suffers from the effects of anthropogenic litter.

Many of the littoral habitats are critical to the survival of several species; therefore, the number of studies investigating the impact of beach litter on habitats is steadily increasing. These studies show interesting interdisciplinary collaborations between biologists, botanists, chemists, eco-toxicologists, and environmental scientists.

This Special Issue aims to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic litter present in marine, lake, and river beaches on the functionality of ecosystems. The main goal of this Special Issue is to answer questions such as: 1) How does beach litter affect the environment? 2) Is there a relationship between beach litter and biodiversity dynamics? 3) How can we measure/determine the impact of beach litter on different habitats? 4) What concrete actions can we take to reduce the impact of beach litter?

Dr. Loris Pietrelli
Dr. Patrizia Menegoni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine litter
  • Freshwater litter
  • Coastal ecosystems
  • Riparian ecosystems
  • Beach litter
  • Microplastics
  • Pollution ecology
  • Socio economic implication of beach litter
  • Contribution of citizen scientists to the monitoring of beach litter

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Small Environmental Actions Need of Problem-Solving Approach: Applying Project Management Tools to Beach Litter Clean-Ups
Environments 2020, 7(10), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7100087 - 11 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1131
Abstract
Clean-ups can be considered real conservation actions since beach litter may impact many ecosystem components. However, although these actions are quite easy to carry out, we think that they need to follow specific criteria and clear planning. Contrariwise, an unplanned clean-up could lead [...] Read more.
Clean-ups can be considered real conservation actions since beach litter may impact many ecosystem components. However, although these actions are quite easy to carry out, we think that they need to follow specific criteria and clear planning. Contrariwise, an unplanned clean-up could lead to counter-productive—or even harmful—consequences to the fragile dune ecosystem; e.g., excessive trampling and/or extreme sand removal. Here, we defined a road map for implementing beach clean-ups according to the logic of problem solving and project management, also adding a flow chart. More particularly, we subdivided the clean-up project into different steps as follows: context analysis, input and planning, process, monitoring (outputs and outcomes) and adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthropogenic Beach Litter and Impact on Habitats)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop