Special Issue "Advanced Oxidation Applications"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. William A. Anderson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo ON, Canada
Tel. 519 888 4567 ext. 35011
Interests: air pollution control; photocatalysis; UV disinfection; biofiltration
Prof. Dr. Madhumita Ray
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Western University, London ON, Canada
Interests: advanced oxidation processes for water and wastewater; adsorption and membrane separation; environmental modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced oxidation technologies continue to be of significant interest for treatment, emission control, and remediation purposes. These have been applied to various media, including air, water, and even solids. A wide variety of technologies and chemistries have been applied and characterized for producing hydroxyl radicals and other oxidizing species to break down recalcitrant or toxic organics in different media. However, there are often significant technical or economic barriers that make adoption of these technologies difficult. This Special Issue focuses on work that seeks to identify and overcome these barriers to advanced oxidation technologies, by exploring novel approaches, new applications, improved reactor designs, or combinations of technologies that hold promise in the field.

Prof. Dr. William A. Anderson
Prof. Dr. Madhumita Ray
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photocatalysis
  • UV oxidation
  • non-thermal plasma
  • Ozone/peroxide/Fenton, ferrate, persulfate chemistries
  • radiolysis
  • sonochemistry
  • electrocatalysis
  • effluent pretreatment
  • performance testing
  • combined systems
  • process development and design

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols by Germicidal Ultraviolet Light
Environments 2019, 6(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6020017 - 31 Jan 2019
Abstract
Ultraviolet (UV) light with a wavelength of 254 nm is known to be germicidal, and thus has been increasingly employed as a method of disinfection for indoor environments. Solar UV wavelengths (300 to 400 nm) are known to initiate the formation of secondary [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet (UV) light with a wavelength of 254 nm is known to be germicidal, and thus has been increasingly employed as a method of disinfection for indoor environments. Solar UV wavelengths (300 to 400 nm) are known to initiate the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles from the photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere, but germicidal wavelengths have not been extensively studied for indoor environments. In this work, toluene was exposed to 254 nm UV light in a laboratory photoreactor while varying the conditions of the air, the duration of UV exposure, and the duration of post-UV time. The number of particles formed in the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) size range was measured, and significant levels of particle formation were observed for UV exposure periods of as short as 5 min. The particle formation ranged from 2.4 × 106 particles/m3 for 5 min of UV exposure, to 163.2 × 106 particles/m3 for 15 min of UV exposure, for toluene concentrations in the range of 55 to 85 mg/m3. Particle formation was found to increase at a relative humidity of approximately 20% and higher. Variations in the initial number of particles present did not appear to have a significant effect on the particle formation, suggesting that nucleation was not a controlling factor under these conditions. However, tests in a commercial environment at much lower VOC concentrations and lower UV fluence rates showed no detectable PM2.5 formation, indicating that SOA formation during the intermittent use of germicidal UV may not significantly affect indoor air quality under normal conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Oxidation Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Vinasse Treatment within the Sugarcane-Ethanol Industry Using Ozone Combined with Anaerobic and Aerobic Microbial Processes
Environments 2019, 6(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6010005 - 07 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The production of ethanol from sugarcane or molasses generates vinasse, a residue rich in organic matter and minerals. Vinasse is often used in fertilization and irrigation practices, which may be linked to negative environmental outcomes if excess is applied. Herein, we introduce a [...] Read more.
The production of ethanol from sugarcane or molasses generates vinasse, a residue rich in organic matter and minerals. Vinasse is often used in fertilization and irrigation practices, which may be linked to negative environmental outcomes if excess is applied. Herein, we introduce a novel alternative to the treatment of vinasse promoting the reduction in Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) levels, phenolic compounds, and its mineral content through the coupling of ozone treatment, anaerobic digestion, and the aerobic growth of fungi. The ozone treatment is able to remove about 30% of the total COD, and deplete the concentration of phenolic compounds, while anaerobic digestion produces biogas and generates vinasse digestate, which is less biorecalcitrant than raw vinasse. The aerobic fungal growth generates oleaginous fungal biomass and promotes over 80% of Kjeldahl-Nitrogen in the vinasse. If vinasse were treated following the sequence of anaerobic digestion, aerobic fungal growth, and ozone treatment, the effluent would have about 95% of the COD decreased, complete removal of phenolic compounds, and over 80% of Kjeldahl-Nitrogen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Oxidation Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Reaction of Ion Exchange Resins with Fenton’s Reagent
Environments 2018, 5(11), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments5110123 - 15 Nov 2018
Abstract
One of the most common treatment methods for spent ion exchange resins is their immobilization in cement, which reduces the release of radionuclides into the environment. Although this method is efficient, it considerably increases the final volume of the waste due to its [...] Read more.
One of the most common treatment methods for spent ion exchange resins is their immobilization in cement, which reduces the release of radionuclides into the environment. Although this method is efficient, it considerably increases the final volume of the waste due to its low incorporation capacity. This work aims to evaluate the degradation of ion exchange resins by the Fenton process (H2O2/Fe2+). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic and anionic resins, both non-radioactive. The reactions were conducted by varying the catalyst concentration (25, 50, 100, and 150 mmol L−1) and the volume of hydrogen peroxide. Three different temperatures were evaluated by varying the flow of reactants, which were 50, 60, and 70 °C. Cement specimens were prepared from the treated solutions and two parameters were assessed—namely, final setting time and axial compressive strength. The results showed that the experimental conditions were suitable to dissolve the resins, and the Fe3+ produced as precipitate during the experiments increased the resistance of the final product. The immobilized product complied with the limits established by regulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Oxidation Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Oxidative Destruction of Organic Pollutants on the Polypropylene Fiber Modified by Nanodispersed Iron
Environments 2018, 5(7), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments5070082 - 16 Jul 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study aims to solve the problem of deep destruction of organic pollutants in industrial effluents by creating new composite materials with prescribed functional properties. This paper researches the possibility of using composites based on a polypropylene fiber under conditions of photocatalytic degradation [...] Read more.
This study aims to solve the problem of deep destruction of organic pollutants in industrial effluents by creating new composite materials with prescribed functional properties. This paper researches the possibility of using composites based on a polypropylene fiber under conditions of photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous and aqueous-organic media. Dye that are water soluble (eosin, brilliant green, rhodamine C) and fat-soluble (blue, yellow and red) have been chosen as organic contaminants. Composites based on the polypropylene fiber have been obtained by introducing nanodispersed iron onto the surface of the initial polymer, using ion implantation and super high frequency irradiation methods. The obtained composites are characterized, and their photocatalytic activity is studied with respect to the pollutants under study in the conditions of the Fenton-like system and visible radiation. The results show that the obtained composite materials are effective catalysts for oxidative photodestruction of organic dyes in aqueous and aqueous-organic media, and their decolorization degree reaches 80–100%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Oxidation Applications)
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