Special Issue "MaxEnt 2019—The 39th International Workshop on Bayesian Inference and Maximum Entropy Methods in Science and Engineering"

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300). This special issue belongs to the section "Multidisciplinary Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Udo Von Toussaint E-Mail
Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching, Germany
Interests: Bayesian probability theory; Surface physics; ion-solid interactions; Experimental design and data fusion; data analysis; MCMC-methods; Robotics; Gaussian processes
Guest Editor
Dr. Roland Preuss E-Mail
Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching, Germany
Interests: MCMC methods; Bayesian inference; inverse problems and uncertainty quantification (UQ)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main topics of this Special Issue are the application of Bayesian inference and the maximum entropy principle to inverse problems in science, machine learning, information theory, and engineering.
Inverse and uncertainty quantification (UQ) problems arise from a large variety of applications, such as earth science, astrophysics, material and plasma science, imaging in geophysics and medicine, nondestructive testing, density estimation, remote sensing, Gaussian process (GP) regression, optimal experimental design, data assimilation, and data mining.
This Special Issue thus invites contributions on all aspects of probabilistic inference, including novel techniques and applications, and work that sheds new light on the foundations of inference.

Dr. Udo Von Toussaint
Dr. Roland Preuss
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Pragmatic Hypotheses in the Evolution of Science
Entropy 2019, 21(9), 883; https://doi.org/10.3390/e21090883 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
This paper introduces pragmatic hypotheses and relates this concept to the spiral of scientific evolution. Previous works determined a characterization of logically consistent statistical hypothesis tests and showed that the modal operators obtained from this test can be represented in the hexagon of [...] Read more.
This paper introduces pragmatic hypotheses and relates this concept to the spiral of scientific evolution. Previous works determined a characterization of logically consistent statistical hypothesis tests and showed that the modal operators obtained from this test can be represented in the hexagon of oppositions. However, despite the importance of precise hypothesis in science, they cannot be accepted by logically consistent tests. Here, we show that this dilemma can be overcome by the use of pragmatic versions of precise hypotheses. These pragmatic versions allow a level of imprecision in the hypothesis that is small relative to other experimental conditions. The introduction of pragmatic hypotheses allows the evolution of scientific theories based on statistical hypothesis testing to be interpreted using the narratological structure of hexagonal spirals, as defined by Pierre Gallais. Full article
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