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Special Issue "Internal Environment and Thermal Performance of Buildings"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "F: Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 1062

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Katarzyna Ratajczak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Environmental Engineering and Building Installations, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4 str., 61-131 Poznań, Poland
Interests: energy efficiency in buildings; heating and ventilation; indoor air quality; outdoor air quality; decentralized ventilation; energy performance of buildings; swimming pools; mechanical ventilation; air conditioning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Łukasz Amanowicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Environmental Engineering and Builiding Installations, Poznan University of Technology
Interests: energy efficiency in buildings; heating ventilation and air conditioning; applied thermodynamics; heat exchangers; heat recovery; decentralized ventilation systems; thermal performance of buildings; surface heating/cooling systems; renewable energy sources; CFD simulations; experimental thermal and flow characteristics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thermal performance of buildings is at the center of global interest. There are many related topics that significantly influence the energy performance of a building: building structure / envelope, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, heat and cold sources, controls, users and much more.

In the energy and thermal performance of buildings, indoor air quality can have a huge impact. Lowering the energy demand in a building must not be at the expense of worsening the quality of the internal environment of the building. There is a need to combine analyzes related to ensuring adequate air quality in buildings while paying attention to the energy performance of the building. It is also important to pay attention to the quality of the outside air. In some regions with high pollution and cold climates, supplying outdoor air to ensure indoor air quality can be crucial for the energy performance of a building.

We believe that each analysis carried out within the above-mentioned areas in different types of buildings should show the impact of research on thermal performance of buildings. We encourage you to submit research, simulation or review works focused on the broadly understood energy efficiency and internal environment in Buildings.

Works related to are especially welcomed:

  • indoor and outdoor air quality,
  • thermal comfort in buildings,
  • thermal performance of buildings - methods, case studies, comparisons,
  • use of Renewable Energy Sources (RES),
  • heat recovery technologies,
  • HVAC systems (heating, ventilation and air conditioning),
  • passive techniques for heating/cooling,
  • energy-oriented control systems,
  • the impact of building use on energy consumption,
  • the impact of indoor and outdoor air quality on energy consumption,
  • climate and internal environment,
  • sources of heat, cold and energy - the possibility of reducing the demand,
  • building assessment,
  • decision support in the field of thermal performance.

Dr. Katarzyna Ratajczak
Dr. Łukasz Amanowicz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Indoor Air Quality
  • IAQ
  • Outdoor Air Quality
  • OAQ
  • Energy performance of building
  • Energy consumption
  • Climate change
  • Renewable Energy Sources
  • Building assessment
  • HVAC
  • Control systems
  • Sources of heat, cold and energy
  • Thermal comfort
  • Heat recovery
  • Passive techniques

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Thermal Comfort—Case Study in a Lightweight Passive House
Energies 2022, 15(13), 4687; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15134687 - 26 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Saving energy while maintaining a high-quality internal environment is an increasingly important scientific and technological challenge in the building sector. This paper presents the results from a long-term study on thermal comfort in a passive house situated in the south of Poland. The [...] Read more.
Saving energy while maintaining a high-quality internal environment is an increasingly important scientific and technological challenge in the building sector. This paper presents the results from a long-term study on thermal comfort in a passive house situated in the south of Poland. The building was constructed in 2010 with the use of prefabricated, lightweight technology. The main energy source is a ground source heat pump which powers the floor heating and DHW. The building is also equipped with a mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery and a ground source heat exchanger. A lightweight building structure which has active systems with limited capabilities (especially for cooling) is a combination which increases the difficulty of maintaining a proper inner environmental condition. Extensive experimental investigations on hygrothermal performance and energy use have been carried out in the building for several years. The measurement results, such as inner air temperature and humidity, as well as the inner surface temperature of partitions, could be directly used to determine basic thermal comfort indicators, including PMV and PPD. Any missing data that has not been directly measured, such as the surface temperature of the windows, floors, and some of the other elements of the building envelope, have been calculated using WUFI®PLUS software and validated with the available measurements. These results are not final; the full measurement of thermal comfort as an applied methodology did not consider human adaptation and assumed constant clothing insulation. Nevertheless, in general, the results show good thermal comfort conditions inside the building under research conditions. This was also confirmed via a survey of the inhabitants: 2 adults and 3 children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internal Environment and Thermal Performance of Buildings)
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Article
Assessment of ANN Algorithms for the Concentration Prediction of Indoor Air Pollutants in Child Daycare Centers
Energies 2022, 15(7), 2654; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15072654 - 05 Apr 2022
Viewed by 438
Abstract
As the time spent by people indoors continues to significantly increase, much attention has been paid to indoor air quality. While many IAQ studies have been conducted through field measurements, the use of data-driven techniques such as machine learning has been increasingly used [...] Read more.
As the time spent by people indoors continues to significantly increase, much attention has been paid to indoor air quality. While many IAQ studies have been conducted through field measurements, the use of data-driven techniques such as machine learning has been increasingly used for the prediction of indoor air pollutants. For the present study, the concentrations of indoor air pollutants such as CO2, PM2.5, and VOCs in child daycare centers were predicted by using an artificial neural network model with three different training algorithms including Levenberg–Marquardt, Bayesian regularization, and Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno quasi-Newton methods. For training and validation, data of indoor pollutants measured in child daycare facilities over a 1-month period were used. The results showed all the models produced a good performance for the prediction of indoor pollutants compared with the measured data. Among the models, the prediction by the LM model met the acceptable criteria of ASHRAE guideline 14 under all conditions. It was observed that the prediction performance decreased as the number of hidden layers increased. Moreover, the prediction performance was differed by the type of indoor pollutant. This was caused by patterns observed in the measured data. Considering the outcomes of the study, better prediction results can be obtained through the selection of suitable prediction models for time series data as well as the adjustment of training algorithms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internal Environment and Thermal Performance of Buildings)
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