Special Issue "Revisiting the Nexus between Energy Consumption and Economic Activity"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Shinji Kaneko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University, 739-8527 Higashihiroshima, Japan
Interests: Development and Environment; Field Experiments; Environmental Economics and Policy
Prof. Ayyoob Sharifi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC), Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
Interests: Urban Energy Consumption; Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation; Sustainability and Resilience of Urban Systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Keisuke Kawata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Scoail Science, The University of Tokyo
Interests: Causal Inference; Machine Learning; Applied Economics; Public Policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The nexus between energy consumption and economic activity has been studied for decades since, on the one hand, economic activity is used as a primary predictor of changes in energy demand and, on the other hand, energy is regarded as one of the important inputs for economic activity. This Special Issue revisits and renews the nexus to gain new academic insights while incorporating four recent developments related to: 1) new policy and institutional agendas such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), climate change, renewable energy, non-conventional fossil energy, and energy efficiency governance that have emerged and significantly alter the dynamics of the nexus; 2) the methodological advancements that allow us to elaborate the differences across causality, correlation, confounder, moderator, mediator, and covariate that significantly improve our understanding of the nexus; 3) the increasing availability of big data that instigates methodological transformations and allows us to highlight new dimensions of the nexus such as distributional variations, multiple interactions and detailed time variances; and 4) the increasing availability of data in developing countries that provides experimental opportunities.

Prof. Dr. Shinji Kaneko
Prof. Ayyoob Sharifi
Assoc. Prof. Keisuke Kawata
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy efficiency governance
  • renewable energy
  • energy security
  • sustainable development goals (SDGs)
  • causal inference
  • randomized control trial (RCT)
  • big data
  • energy consumption
  • economic activity
  • decoupling economic growth and energy consumption (CO2 emissions)
  • climate change mitigation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Causal Nexus between Energy Consumption, Environmental Pollution and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from Central and Eastern Europe
Energies 2019, 12(19), 3704; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12193704 - 27 Sep 2019
Abstract
Energy is considered a critical driver of social and economic progress, but the use of conventional energy from fossil fuel sources is viewed as the main contributor to greenhouse gases that cause global warming. To overcome such issues, renewable energy technologies appeared as [...] Read more.
Energy is considered a critical driver of social and economic progress, but the use of conventional energy from fossil fuel sources is viewed as the main contributor to greenhouse gases that cause global warming. To overcome such issues, renewable energy technologies appeared as a viable substitute which lessens pollutant emissions and protect the environment. This paper investigates the impact of energy consumption and environmental pollution on economic growth, also exploring the causal associations, for a sample of 11 Central and Eastern European states over the period 2000 to 2016. The outcomes of panel data regressions indicate evidence of a non-linear link between renewable energy (both overall, as well as in form of hydro and wind power) and gross domestic product per capita growth. The non-linear relations were also established in case of alternative & nuclear energy and fossil fuel energy consumption. However, the influence of non-renewable energy on growth was not statistically significant, whereas greenhouse gases emissions exhibited mostly a positive impact on economic growth. The robustness checks by panel fully modified and dynamic ordinary least squares showed almost the similar pattern of results. The results of Granger causalities within six panel vector error correction models supported in the short-run the conservation hypothesis for renewable energy (overall), but also for hydro power and solid biofuels, excluding charcoal. In the long-run the growth hypothesis was established for renewable energy (overall), along with wind power, solid biofuels, excluding charcoal and geothermal energy. The findings imply that CEECs policy makers should consider imperative investments in the development of renewable energy sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Revisiting the Nexus between Energy Consumption and Economic Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
The Impact of an Energy Efficiency Improvement Policy on the Economic Performance of Electricity-Intensive Firms in Ghana
Energies 2019, 12(19), 3684; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12193684 - 26 Sep 2019
Abstract
This paper investigates the economic impact of an energy efficiency improvement policy on electricity-intensive firms in Ghana. The policy imposed a penalty on these electricity-intensive firms, which are referred to as special load tariff (SLT) customers, when their power factor was below 90%. [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the economic impact of an energy efficiency improvement policy on electricity-intensive firms in Ghana. The policy imposed a penalty on these electricity-intensive firms, which are referred to as special load tariff (SLT) customers, when their power factor was below 90%. This paper applies the regression discontinuity design (RDD) to the panel data of these SLTs ranging from 1994 to 2012, excluding those years characterized by energy crisis. The results show adverse impacts of the policy on the employment and salary levels of the firms in the long run, in particular, the small- and medium–voltage firms. The results indicate that small- and medium–voltage firms are economically vulnerable to the penalty policy in the long run and recommend two policies to overcome this challenge. Firstly, the penalty for power factor improvement should not be imposed identically across firms with different voltage levels. Secondly, firms that satisfy the power factor standard should receive subsidies to improve their competitiveness in the market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Revisiting the Nexus between Energy Consumption and Economic Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
Can Nighttime Light Data Be Used to Estimate Electric Power Consumption? New Evidence from Causal-Effect Inference
Energies 2019, 12(16), 3154; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12163154 - 16 Aug 2019
Abstract
Nighttime light data are often used to estimate some socioeconomic indicators, such as energy consumption, GDP, population, etc. However, whether there is a causal relationship between them needs further study. In this paper, we propose a causal-effect inference method to test whether nighttime [...] Read more.
Nighttime light data are often used to estimate some socioeconomic indicators, such as energy consumption, GDP, population, etc. However, whether there is a causal relationship between them needs further study. In this paper, we propose a causal-effect inference method to test whether nighttime light data are suitable for estimating socioeconomic indicators. Data on electric power consumption and nighttime light intensity in 77 countries were used for the empirical research. The main conclusions are as follows: First, nighttime light data are more appropriate for estimating electric power consumption in developing countries, such as China, India, and others. Second, more latent factors need to be added into the model when estimating the power consumption of developed countries using nighttime light data. Third, the light spillover effect is relatively strong, which is not suitable for estimating socioeconomic indicators in the contiguous regions between developed countries and developing countries, such as Spain, Turkey, and others. Finally, we suggest that more attention should be paid in the future to the intrinsic logical relationship between nighttime light data and socioeconomic indicators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Revisiting the Nexus between Energy Consumption and Economic Activity)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Effect of Renewable Energy Consumption on Sustainable Economic Development: Evidence from Emerging and Developing Economies
Energies 2019, 12(15), 2954; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12152954 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
The objective of the paper is to figure out the nexus between renewable energy consumption and sustainable economic development for emerging and developing countries. In this paper, a panel of 30 emerging and developing countries is selected using the World Development Indicators (WDI) [...] Read more.
The objective of the paper is to figure out the nexus between renewable energy consumption and sustainable economic development for emerging and developing countries. In this paper, a panel of 30 emerging and developing countries is selected using the World Development Indicators (WDI) of the World Bank, Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI) by Ernst and Young, and a random selection method based on the current trend of renewable energy consumption for five different regions of the world i.e., Asia, South-Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Caribbean. To achieve the objective, robust panel econometric models such as the Pesaran cross-section dependence (CD) test, second generation panel unit root test, e.g., cross-sectional augmented IPS test (CIPS) proposed by Pesran (2007), panel co-integration test, fully modified ordinary least square (FMOLS) and dynamic ordinary least square (DOLS) are applied to check the cross-sectional dependence, heterogeneity and long-term relationship among variables. The panel is strongly balanced and the findings suggest a significant long-run relationship between renewable energy consumption and economic growth for selected South Asian, Asian and most of the African countries (Ghana, Tunisia, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Cameroon). But for the Latin American and the Caribbean countries, economic growth depends on non-renewable energy consumption. Renewable energy consumption in the selected countries of these two regions are still at the initial stage. In case of the renewable energy consumption and CO 2 emissions nexus, for selected South Asian, Asian, Latin American and African countries both GDP and non-renewable energy consumption cause the increase of CO 2 emissions. For the Caribbean countries only non-renewable energy consumption causes the increase of CO 2 emissions. An important finding regarding renewable energy consumption-economic growth nexus indicates the existence of bi-directional causality. This supports the existence of a feedback hypothesis for the emerging and developing economies. In the case of renewable energy consumption- CO 2 emissions nexus, there exists unidirectional causality. This supports the existence of the conservation hypothesis, where CO 2 emissions necessitates the renewable energy consumptions. Based on the findings, the study proposes possible policy options. The countries, who have passed the take-off stage of renewable energy consumption, can take advanced policy initiatives e.g., feed-in tariff, renewable portfolio standard and green certificate for long-term economic development. Other countries can undertake subsidy, low interest loan and market development to facilitate the renewable energy investments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Revisiting the Nexus between Energy Consumption and Economic Activity)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Electrification on School Enrollment in Bangladesh: Short- and Long-Run Perspectives
Energies 2019, 12(4), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12040629 - 15 Feb 2019
Abstract
This paper aims to show the impact of access to electricity on school enrollment in Bangladesh. It offers an empirical investigation of the relationship between access to electricity and school enrollment statuses, such as grade progression, repetition, and non-attendance. The data were taken [...] Read more.
This paper aims to show the impact of access to electricity on school enrollment in Bangladesh. It offers an empirical investigation of the relationship between access to electricity and school enrollment statuses, such as grade progression, repetition, and non-attendance. The data were taken from Bangladesh’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) database 2012–2013 provided by the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS) and UNICEF; the data include two years of grading information for children of ages ranging from 5–15. We applied the propensity score matching (PSM) and the Markov schooling transition model using matched sample data. The results show that access to electricity has a significant positive effect on grade progression and a significant negative effect on non-attendance in the short run as well as in the long run. The simulation result shows that the non-attendance rate is lower and the school enrollment rate for children grades 9-11 is higher in the electrified areas compared to unelectrified areas. This result suggests that access to electricity is an important strategic indicator for increasing school enrollment in both primary and secondary schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Revisiting the Nexus between Energy Consumption and Economic Activity)
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