Special Issue "Alternative Energy Systems in Buildings"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Enrique Rosales Asensio
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Antonio Colmenar Santos
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Editorial Board Member
Department of Electrical, Electronic, Control, Telematics and Chemical Engineering Applied to Engineering, Higher Technical School of Industrial Engineers, National University of Distance Education, Juan del Rosal, 12 Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: power electronics; distribution generation; active distribution networks
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Prof. Dr. David Borge Diez
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Energy Resources' Smart Management (ERESMA) Research Group, Department Area of Electrical Engineering, School of Mines Engineering, University of Léon, 24071 Leon, Spain
Interests: energy efficiency; energy economics; renewable energy; energy simulation; energy optimization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main objective of this Special Issue is to evaluate alternative energy systems in buildings, regardless of their location and climatic conditions. Over the past few years, the use of passive cooling and heating technologies has become more common for reducing the energy consumption of buildings. However, these technologies are not often used for some building systems. Buildings intended for children or the elderly are often climatized to improve indoor thermal conditions. In this Special Issue, a cost reduction in climatization based on passive systems is expected to be conducted. Building site optimization is expected to be performed to improve thermal behavior. To achieve this, computational fluid dynamics tools are expected to be used. These reductions are expected to be studied for conventional and renewable energy systems, showing that passive systems provide better thermal comfort and reduce initial investment and energy consumption, making low-cost buildings feasible.

Dr. Enrique Rosales Asensio
Prof. Dr. Antonio Colmenar Santos
Prof. Dr. David Borge Diez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alternative energy systems
  • climatic conditions
  • passive cooling and heating
  • energy consumption in buildings
  • indoor thermal conditions
  • low-cost buildings

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Desiccant-Assisted Air Conditioning System Relying on Solar and Geothermal Energy during Summer and Winter
Energies 2019, 12(16), 3175; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12163175 - 19 Aug 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
At Hamburg University of Technology the combination of an open cycle desiccant-assisted air conditioning system and a geothermal system is investigated in the framework of different research projects for several years. The objective of this study is to investigate the energy efficiency of [...] Read more.
At Hamburg University of Technology the combination of an open cycle desiccant-assisted air conditioning system and a geothermal system is investigated in the framework of different research projects for several years. The objective of this study is to investigate the energy efficiency of the overall system and to evaluate the geothermal system during summer and winter mode, based on data measured for a temperate climate region. Monitoring results of the performance for dehumidification and remoistening of supply air are presented. Furthermore, the investigated system is compared to reference air conditioning processes. During summer mode, an average dehumidification efficiency of 1.15 is achieved. The electrical energy savings compared to a conventional reference system sum up to 50% for the investigated cooling period. System operation during winter shows an average moisture recovery efficiency of 0.75. The electrical energy demand for air humidification is reduced by 50% compared to a system with electric isothermal air humidification. The geothermal system is operated efficiently throughout the year for cooling and heating application. Besides the energetic system evaluation, measured data regarding the soil temperature and thermal comfort are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Energy Systems in Buildings) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
An Energy Potential Estimation Methodology and Novel Prototype Design for Building-Integrated Wind Turbines
Energies 2019, 12(10), 2027; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12102027 - 27 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
ROSEO-BIWT is a new Building-Integrated Wind Turbine (BIWT) intended for installation on the edge of buildings. It consists of a Savonius wind turbine and guiding vanes to accelerate the usual horizontal wind, together with the vertical upward air stream on the wall. This [...] Read more.
ROSEO-BIWT is a new Building-Integrated Wind Turbine (BIWT) intended for installation on the edge of buildings. It consists of a Savonius wind turbine and guiding vanes to accelerate the usual horizontal wind, together with the vertical upward air stream on the wall. This edge effect improves the performance of the wind turbine, and its architectural integration is also beneficial. The hypothetical performance and design configuration were studied for a university building in Eibar city using wind data from the ERA5 reanalysis (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts’ reanalysis), an anemometer to calibrate the data, and the actual small-scale behavior in a wind tunnel. The data acquired by the anemometer show high correlations with the ERA5 data in the direction parallel to the valley, and the calibration is therefore valid. According to the results, a wind speed augmentation factor of three due to the edge effect and concentration vanes would lead to a increase in working hours at the rated power, resulting annually in more than 2000 h. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Energy Systems in Buildings) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Evaluation of Supply–Demand Adaptation of Photovoltaic–Wind Hybrid Plants Integrated into an Urban Environment
Energies 2019, 12(9), 1780; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12091780 - 10 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A massive integration of renewable energy sources is imperative to comply with the greenhouse emissions reduction targets fixed to achieve the limitation of global warming. Nevertheless, the present integration levels are still far from the targets. The main reason being the technical barriers [...] Read more.
A massive integration of renewable energy sources is imperative to comply with the greenhouse emissions reduction targets fixed to achieve the limitation of global warming. Nevertheless, the present integration levels are still far from the targets. The main reason being the technical barriers arising from their non-manageable features. Photovoltaic and wind sources are the widest spread, as their maturity allows generation with a high-efficiency degree. A deep understanding of facilities’ performance and how they can match the energy demand is mandatory to reduce costs and extend the technical limits and facilitate their penetration. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to evaluate how photovoltaic–wind hybrid facilities, placed in an urban environment can give generation patterns which will be able to match the demand profiles better than facilities installed individually. This methodology has been applied to a broad number of locations spread over the whole planet. The results show that with high homogeneity in terms of site weather characteristics, the hybrid facilities improve the matching up to 15% over photovoltaic plants and up to 35% over wind. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Energy Systems in Buildings) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview
Review on Building-Integrated Photovoltaics Electrical System Requirements and Module-Integrated Converter Recommendations
Energies 2019, 12(8), 1532; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12081532 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 9
Abstract
Since building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) modules are typically installed during, not after, the construction phase, BIPVs have a profound impact compared to conventional building-applied photovoltaics on the electrical installation and construction planning of a building. As the cost of BIPV modules decreases over time, [...] Read more.
Since building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) modules are typically installed during, not after, the construction phase, BIPVs have a profound impact compared to conventional building-applied photovoltaics on the electrical installation and construction planning of a building. As the cost of BIPV modules decreases over time, the impact of electrical system architecture and converters will become more prevalent in the overall cost of the system. This manuscript provides an overview of potential BIPV electrical architectures. System-level criteria for BIPV installations are established, thus providing a reference framework to compare electrical architectures. To achieve modularity and to minimize engineering costs, module-level DC/DC converters preinstalled in the BIPV module turned out to be the best solution. The second part of this paper establishes converter-level requirements, derived and related to the BIPV system. These include measures to increase the converter fault tolerance for extended availability and to ensure essential safety features. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Energy Systems in Buildings) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview
Recent Developments in Solar Energy-Harvesting Technologies for Building Integration and Distributed Energy Generation
Energies 2019, 12(6), 1080; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12061080 - 20 Mar 2019
Cited by 16
Abstract
We present a review of the current state of the field for a rapidly evolving group of technologies related to solar energy harvesting in built environments. In particular, we focus on recent achievements in enabling the widespread distributed generation of electric energy assisted [...] Read more.
We present a review of the current state of the field for a rapidly evolving group of technologies related to solar energy harvesting in built environments. In particular, we focus on recent achievements in enabling the widespread distributed generation of electric energy assisted by energy capture in semi-transparent or even optically clear glazing systems and building wall areas. Whilst concentrating on recent cutting-edge results achieved in the integration of traditional photovoltaic device types into novel concentrator-type windows and glazings, we compare the main performance characteristics reported with these using more conventional (opaque or semi-transparent) solar cell technologies. A critical overview of the current status and future application potential of multiple existing and emergent energy harvesting technologies for building integration is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alternative Energy Systems in Buildings) Printed Edition available
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