energies-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

The Application of Weather and Climate Research in the Energy Sector

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B: Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 2407

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
World Energy & Meteorology Council (WEMC), Norwich, Norfolk, UK
Interests: weather and climate; applications to energy and other sectors

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
RTE France, Paris-La Defense, Paris, France
Interests: power system evolution; climate change; short-term supply-demand balance

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Applications Laboratory (RAL), National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, USA
Interests: meteorology; wind energy; artificial intelligence; renewable energy; boundary layer meteorology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The energy sector is undergoing an enormous transformation. On one hand, a transition to renewables is essential to meet future energy demand and to achieve a carbon emission reduction of 45 per cent by 2030 and net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 aligned with the 1.5 °C target, as stipulated by the Paris Agreement (2015), as well as to fulfil the aim of Sustainable Development Goal 7 (Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all). On the other hand, there is a need to ensure climate resilience across the energy sector against more frequent and intense extreme weather, water and climate events, as climate change is putting energy security at risk, globally.

For the energy sector, achieving net zero emissions requires a rapid decarbonisation of the energy system (e.g., generation, infrastructure, transport) with much of the replacement capacity being variable renewable energy. Such decarbonisation also includes a drastic increase in energy efficiency and system resilience, a thorough digitalisation for smart decisions and a boosted investment in low-carbon innovation. As a result, the energy sector has recently begun an epochal infrastructure, technological and societal transformation. In this context, Weather and Climate information is an indispensable enabler for an effective and timely energy transformation.

In this context, many lines of research are active and expanding that support this energy transition. This Special Issue, therefore, invites papers that contribute toward the following areas:

  1. Energy Planning and Financing;
  2. Energy Operations and Maintenance;
  3. Energy Resource Management;
  4. Energy Systems Risk Assessment and Investment;
  5. Climate and Energy Modelling;
  6. Environmental impacts of energy systems;
  7. Weather and Climate Services for Energy;
  8. Energy policy, programmes and cross-sectoral issues;
  9. Education/training programmes in energy and meteorology.

We look forward to receiving your contributions

Dr. Alberto Troccoli
Dr. Laurent Dubus
Prof. Dr. Sue Ellen Haupt
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • weather and climate
  • forecasting and projections
  • climate and energy modelling
  • energy operations and maintenance
  • energy planning and financing
  • energy systems risk assessment & resilience

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

36 pages, 17997 KiB  
Article
Evaluation and Bias Correction of the ERA5 Reanalysis over the United States for Wind and Solar Energy Applications
by James M. Wilczak, Elena Akish, Antonietta Capotondi and Gilbert P. Compo
Energies 2024, 17(7), 1667; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17071667 - 31 Mar 2024
Viewed by 716
Abstract
The applicability of the ERA5 reanalysis for estimating wind and solar energy generation over the contiguous United States is evaluated using wind speed and irradiance variables from multiple observational data sets. After converting ERA5 and observed meteorological variables into wind power and solar [...] Read more.
The applicability of the ERA5 reanalysis for estimating wind and solar energy generation over the contiguous United States is evaluated using wind speed and irradiance variables from multiple observational data sets. After converting ERA5 and observed meteorological variables into wind power and solar power, comparisons demonstrate that significant errors in the ERA5 reanalysis exist that limit its direct applicability for a wind and solar energy analysis. Overall, ERA5-derived solar power is biased high, while ERA5-derived wind power is biased low. During winter, the ERA5-derived solar power is biased high by 23% on average, while on an annual basis, the ERA5-derived wind power is biased low by 20%. ERA5-derived solar power errors are found to have consistent characteristics across the contiguous United States. Errors for the shortest duration and most extreme solar negative anomaly events are relatively small in the ERA5 when completely overcast conditions occur in both the ERA5 and observations. However, longer-duration anomaly events on weekly to monthly timescales, which include partially cloudy days or a mix of cloudy and sunny days, have significant ERA5 errors. At 10 days duration, the ERA5-derived average solar power produced during the largest negative anomaly events is 62% greater than observed. The ERA5 wind speed and derived wind power negative biases are largely consistent across the central and northwestern U.S., and offshore, while the northeastern U.S. has an overall small net bias. For the ERA5-derived most extreme negative anomaly wind power events, at some sites at 10 days duration, the ERA5-derived wind power produced can be less than half of that observed. Corrections to ERA5 are derived using a quantile–quantile method for solar power and linear regression of wind speed for wind power. These methods are shown to avoid potential over-inflation of the reanalysis variability resulting from differences between point measurements and the temporally and spatially smoother reanalysis values. The corrections greatly reduce the ERA5 errors, including those for extreme events associated with wind and solar energy droughts, which will be most challenging for electric grid operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Application of Weather and Climate Research in the Energy Sector)
Show Figures

Figure 1

30 pages, 8038 KiB  
Article
Power Production, Inter- and Intra-Array Wake Losses from the U.S. East Coast Offshore Wind Energy Lease Areas
by Sara C. Pryor and Rebecca J. Barthelmie
Energies 2024, 17(5), 1063; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17051063 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1119
Abstract
There is an urgent need to develop accurate predictions of power production, wake losses and array–array interactions from multi-GW offshore wind farms in order to enable developments that maximize power benefits, minimize levelized cost of energy and reduce investment uncertainty. New, climatologically representative [...] Read more.
There is an urgent need to develop accurate predictions of power production, wake losses and array–array interactions from multi-GW offshore wind farms in order to enable developments that maximize power benefits, minimize levelized cost of energy and reduce investment uncertainty. New, climatologically representative simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are presented and analyzed to address these research needs with a specific focus on offshore wind energy lease areas along the U.S. east coast. These, uniquely detailed, simulations are designed to quantify important sources of wake-loss projection uncertainty. They sample across different wind turbine deployment scenarios and thus span the range of plausible installed capacity densities (ICDs) and also include two wind farm parameterizations (WFPs; Fitch and explicit wake parameterization (EWP)) and consider the precise WRF model release used. System-wide mean capacity factors for ICDs of 3.5 to 6.0 MWkm−2 range from 39 to 45% based on output from Fitch and 50 to 55% from EWP. Wake losses are 27–37% (Fitch) and 11–19% (EWP). The discrepancy in CF and wake losses from the two WFPs derives from two linked effects. First, EWP generates a weaker ‘deep array effect’ within the largest wind farm cluster (area of 3675 km2), though both parameterizations indicate substantial within-array wake losses. If 15 MW wind turbines are deployed at an ICD of 6 MWkm−2 the most heavily waked wind turbines generate an average of only 32–35% of the power of those that experience the freestream (undisturbed) flow. Nevertheless, there is no evidence for saturation of the resource. The wind power density (electrical power generation per unit of surface area) increases with ICD and lies between 2 and 3 Wm−2. Second, EWP also systematically generates smaller whole wind farm wakes. Sampling across all offshore wind energy lease areas and the range of ICD considered, the whole wind farm wake extent for a velocity deficit of 5% is 1.18 to 1.38 times larger in simulations with Fitch. Over three-quarters of the variability in normalized wake extents is attributable to variations in freestream wind speeds, turbulent kinetic energy and boundary layer depth. These dependencies on meteorological parameters allow for the development of computationally efficient emulators of wake extents from Fitch and EWP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Application of Weather and Climate Research in the Energy Sector)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop