Leadership and Management of Education in the Digital and Intelligent Era

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Technology Enhanced Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 13135

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Academy of Future Education, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, 111 Ren'ai Road, Suzhou, China
Interests: hexie (harmony) management theory; organisational behaviour; leadership and management education; transnational higher education; education ecosystem; education transformation; hexie (harmony) education model

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Guest Editor
XJTLU Entrepreneur College, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123, China
Interests: entrepreneurial education; TNE; future education; language and identity; quality assurance; academic literacies

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Guest Editor
Academy of Future Education, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123, China
Interests: future education; management education; leadership; institutional change; educational management; learning and teaching innovation
Department of Educational Studies, Academy of Future Education, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123, China
Interests: future education; management education; technology-enhanced learning; institutional change; educational management; learning and teaching innovation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to submit your research to this Special Issue of Education Sciences, titled Leadership and Management of Education in the Digital and Intelligent Era.

Globally, higher education institutions face many challenges, from changes in the global economic situation, lack of government funding, increased competition in an ‘international’ market, and growth in the demand of student numbers. Arguably, however, the greatest challenge facing education comes from advances in technology, led by increased digitalization and Artificial Intelligence (AI). Digitalization and AI have been reshaping society in recent decades, promoting dramatic changes in human life. Until recently, education has been relatively immune, with education methodologies and institutions largely unchanged in how they operate. This, however, is now changing dramatically as we are on the edge of a disruptive shift that will change education forever. Largely driven by concepts of Industry 4.0, the opportunities that AI and Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality/Extended Reality bring through digital technology that is better able to understand human learning, cognitive development and emotions, means learning design, delivery, assessment, and ultimately leadership and management within education will change.

Although there is much research and practical exploration on future society, future work, future learning, and future education, there is a lack of evidence of innovative practice and models of new leadership and management in education, and how they (can) respond to the challenges and opportunities to support future learning and education through embracing disruptive technologies. This Special Issue aims to advance scientific research in the field of leadership and management of the future of education and to share innovative and validated theories, programs, practices, methods, and projects, developed in the context of disruptive change within higher education. Original research articles and reviews are welcome. Areas of research relating to leadership and management of future education may include (but are not limited to) the following: educational paradigm shift and future education models, leadership envisions, new governance system, new ways of organizing and supporting system, innovative operation/ management system, new technologies to facilitate agile management system, future-oriented learning platform/ecosystem, university transformation and change management for future education.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Youmin Xi
Prof. Dr. Stuart Perrin
Dr. Xiaojun Zhang
Dr. Na Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • future education
  • paradigm shift
  • governance
  • university transformation
  • change management

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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26 pages, 6789 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Intellectual Structure of the Knowledge Base on Transformational School Leadership: A Bibliometric and Science Mapping Analysis
by Turgut Karakose, Tijen Tülübaş, Stamatios Papadakis and Ramazan Yirci
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13070708 - 12 Jul 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1853
Abstract
Transformational leadership has been persistently studied in the educational administration field considering that it can be a viable tool to respond to the increasing demands on school systems for greater effectiveness. As a result, a rich knowledge base has been accumulated. Our study [...] Read more.
Transformational leadership has been persistently studied in the educational administration field considering that it can be a viable tool to respond to the increasing demands on school systems for greater effectiveness. As a result, a rich knowledge base has been accumulated. Our study aims to investigate this knowledge base by combining bibliometric and science mapping analysis so as to exhibit its intellectual and conceptual architecture, and to reveal the strategic themes that emerged during the scientific evolution of transformational school leadership (TSL). 300 articles retrieved from the Scopus database were included in the analysis. The thematic evolution analysis was performed using the SciMAT software over three time periods: the Incubation Period (1989–2009), the Development Period (2010–2020), and the Maturation Period (2021–2022). The findings show that research during the Incubation Period mostly attempted to conceptualize TSL while it mostly focused on principals, instructional leadership, and self-efficacy during the Development Period. The mentoring theme emerged during the first period but disappeared later without being fully-developed. Teacher leadership emerged as a weakly-addressed theme during all periods. Work-family conflict and digital competencies were the two prominent themes during the Maturation Period while online learning and learning culture were found to be the emerging themes. The findings suggest significant implications for the sustainable development of the TSL research field. Full article
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12 pages, 241 KiB  
Article
Reflections on an Academic Leadership Approach to Implementing Digital Education in Higher Education
by Gloria Visintini
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(12), 904; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12120904 - 9 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1433
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to reflect upon personal experiences with a Foucauldian-inspired academic leadership approach to implementing digital education at the University of Bristol. Higher Education Institutions across the UK often invest in digital infrastructure and central support teams (technical and [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to reflect upon personal experiences with a Foucauldian-inspired academic leadership approach to implementing digital education at the University of Bristol. Higher Education Institutions across the UK often invest in digital infrastructure and central support teams (technical and educational) and expect these investments alone to be the main vehicles to achieve digital education. While clearly, having technologies and support play a key role in digital education, according to my experience the implementation of digital education is complex and requires focused and scholarly leadership to drive it. This is because I argue that digital education can be considered a ‘discourse’, in the Foucauldian sense, of our era whose implementation involves considerable social change. Through my work as the academic person first responsible for digital education in the School of Modern Languages and then across the Faculty of Arts at the University of Bristol, I will unpack how having someone with the appropriate practical and theoretical expertise leading the digital education agenda brought positive impacts before and during the pandemic. Drawing on reflections from years of academic leadership, I will consider questions such as: What practices can lead the digital education discourse to advance in HE settings? And, which agents in HE can develop these practices? This theoretical-oriented discussion grounded on personal experience can be useful for institutions making decisions about how to take digital education forward. Indeed, as we emerge from the pandemic, universities are in the process of choosing whether to go back to a pre-COVID time characterised by a power struggle between different educational discourses, which often meant that the digital education discourse remained marginal, or whether to embrace and invest more in digital education and associated academic leadership. Full article
10 pages, 889 KiB  
Article
Post-COVID-19 Development of Transnational Education in China: Challenges and Opportunities
by Yao Sun, Na Li, Jian Li Hao, Luigi Di Sarno and Lu Wang
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 416; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12060416 - 18 Jun 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4368
Abstract
Transnational education is education delivered to students in a country other than the country in which the awarding institution is based. While the outbreak of COVID-19 has significantly affected higher education, transnational education has exhibited its resilience against the pandemic, and has been [...] Read more.
Transnational education is education delivered to students in a country other than the country in which the awarding institution is based. While the outbreak of COVID-19 has significantly affected higher education, transnational education has exhibited its resilience against the pandemic, and has been continuously expanding in China. In parallel with the golden opportunities for the expansion of transnational education in China after the pandemic, a series of challenges resulting from the transnational context needs to be taken into due consideration, and to be properly addressed. In this paper, the opportunities and challenges for the post-COVID-19 development of transnational education in China are systematically discussed, based on the transnational education delivery at a Sino-Foreign cooperative university. Following our observations on opportunities and challenges, several suggestions are proposed, to address the potential challenges for the stable post-COVID-19 development of transnational education in China. Full article
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Review

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15 pages, 3053 KiB  
Review
Employability Is a Journey: Conceptualising Processual Employability as a Career Identity Emergence Process
by Huaiyuan Zhang, Xiaojun Zhang and Gayle Brewer
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13060607 - 14 Jun 2023
Viewed by 2121
Abstract
This paper aims to conceptualise processual employability with identity theory to reflect the amorphous and developmental nature of employability. Through literature review, we propose a model demonstrating how the career identity emergence process is linked with processual employability behaviour through four stages of [...] Read more.
This paper aims to conceptualise processual employability with identity theory to reflect the amorphous and developmental nature of employability. Through literature review, we propose a model demonstrating how the career identity emergence process is linked with processual employability behaviour through four stages of identity change: Identity Enactment, Identity Validation, Identity Construction, and Identity Exploration. Each stage is driven by the tension between the individual’s current career identity and the experienced social interactions with a changing Individual–World of Work Interface, which eventually constitutes an iterative process of employability suitable for the individual career context. It thus clarifies how the pursuit of an achieved career identity drives processual employability in a fast-changing social context and provides a holistic view of employability as a journey of identity changes. This review responds to the call for integrating developmental and sustainable views into employability and also enriches identity-based employability theories. Full article
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Other

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15 pages, 1289 KiB  
Essay
Teaching in Higher Education after COVID-19: Optimizing Faculty Time and Effort Using a Proposed Model
by Naeem Bajwa, Thomas Tudor, Otmar Varela and Karen Leonard
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14020121 - 25 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1134
Abstract
We propose a model for use in higher education after COVID-19 that addresses how to organize class methods for effective and efficient teaching outcomes for both students and instructors. Faculty have a finite amount of time that they may spend on their courses [...] Read more.
We propose a model for use in higher education after COVID-19 that addresses how to organize class methods for effective and efficient teaching outcomes for both students and instructors. Faculty have a finite amount of time that they may spend on their courses and must determine which time combinations produce the best outcomes. First, we discuss the key work-related challenges faced by faculty and contend that competing demands on faculty time result in inefficient allocation of their time and effort. We then model the issue as an optimization problem and illustrate through examples how to help faculty choose optimal method combinations along with time spent. We use time as a measure of effort and define which combination of methods might be most effective for achieving course learning objectives. There are opportunities for wider use of this methodology, as effective application of effort toward meeting the appropriate learning objectives should create better outcomes. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, including how administrators can use it to support and encourage faculty. Full article
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