Special Issue "Culturally Responsive Leadership in Education: Engaging Social Justice and Equity for Improvement"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Lorri J. Santamaría

Faculty of Education, The University of Auckland, Gate 3, 74 Epsom Avenue, Epsom, Auckland, 1087, New Zealand
Website | E-Mail
Interests: social justice and equity in education and leadership; culturally responsive education and leadership; education promoting cultural and linguistic diversity and academic achievement in Early Childhood, Primary, Middle School Secondary and Higher Education (preK-HE)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last twenty years, researchers have been identifying and discussing various gaps (e.g., academic, social, economic) impacting systemically underserved students at every educational level. These students are those who have greater propensity for discrimination associated with poverty, race, ethnicity, language, culture, and sometimes gender. Differences inherent to these student who in the U.S. are often Black, Latino/a, or American Indian, has resulted in system-wide educational dissonance, confirmed by empirical and often deficit-oriented research. This phenomena is not unique to North America, as educational inequities are prevalent for systemically underserved learners the world over. Unfortunately, there have been few strengths-based research contributions addressing ways in which achievement and other gaps affect inequities within the pre-kindergarten higher education student pipeline. There have also been few investigations determining ways in which leaders are able to improve educational outcomes for students. In this Special Issue of Educational Sciences we seek to feature empirical research that defines, exemplifies, and engages culturally responsive leadership manifested as socially just and equitable leadership practices to benefit education and all of society. We also invite rigorous critically centred contributions emphasising high expectations for achievement; including pedagogical and social inclusion of students’ history, core-values, community, and cultural knowledge. We particularly encourage intergenerational scholars and researchers to collaboratively submit local, regional, or global research that may inform comparative perspectives.

Lorri J. Santamaría
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • social justice and equity education;
  • leadership for social justice;
  • culturally responsive education;
  • culturally responsive leadership;
  • cultural and linguistic diversity and academic achievement

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle Using Institutional Resources and Agency to Support Graduate Students’ Success at a Hispanic Serving Institution
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6030028
Received: 2 November 2015 / Revised: 11 July 2016 / Accepted: 2 August 2016 / Published: 16 August 2016
PDF Full-text (225 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is a growing body of evidence that links increased social capital to minority student success in college. This paper seeks to expand specifically on the graduate experience of underrepresented minorities (URM) at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) using the social capital framework.
[...] Read more.
There is a growing body of evidence that links increased social capital to minority student success in college. This paper seeks to expand specifically on the graduate experience of underrepresented minorities (URM) at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) using the social capital framework. In a cross-sectional survey, 198 graduate students retrospectively considered the role of institutional resources and agents in their success towards graduation. Data revealed that motivational factors such as a sense of personal achievement, family support, peer support, career promotion, supportive faculty, program satisfaction, and faculty mentor played critical roles in the success of graduate students at HSI. Specifically, Latino students are more likely to report that faculty mentors played a significant role in their success compared to their non-Latino peers χ2(1, N = 195) = 5.33, p = 0.02. Latinos/as were also more likely to use writing support services than their non-Latino/a peers χ2(2, N = 190) = 7.59, p = 0.02. By identifying and increasing access to institutional resources and agents, underrepresented minorities in post-baccalaureate programs may encounter less barriers to graduate degree success. Full article
Open AccessArticle Mapping the Complexities of Effective Leadership for Social Justice Praxis in Urban Auckland Primary Schools
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6010011
Received: 30 October 2015 / Revised: 16 February 2016 / Accepted: 8 March 2016 / Published: 17 March 2016
PDF Full-text (754 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This empirical research is about strengths-based leadership practices that seek to explore leadership for social justice and equity in New Zealand’s culturally and linguistically diverse educational and social landscape. Similar to the diversity in other countries, where leaders demonstrate culturally responsive leadership practices
[...] Read more.
This empirical research is about strengths-based leadership practices that seek to explore leadership for social justice and equity in New Zealand’s culturally and linguistically diverse educational and social landscape. Similar to the diversity in other countries, where leaders demonstrate culturally responsive leadership practices in their quest to educate diverse democracies. This inquiry examines the characteristics and behaviours of effective leadership for social justice and equity for student academic achievement in urban Auckland primary schools. A qualitative, comparative case study, combined with the theoretical framework of applied critical leadership from theories of transformational leadership, critical pedagogy and critical race theory (perspective lens) guided the research methods. The research findings presented several applied critical leadership characteristics that highlighted the complexities of leading for social justice in urban Auckland primary schools. A distinct phenomenon was leader’s axiological philosophy (values, beliefs and morals) underpinning their leadership that was culturally responsive to the diversity in their educational contexts. These findings suggest the need for research and scholarship yet to be done in this largely unexplored educational leadership academic space. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Counterstories about Leadership: A Latina School Principal’s Experience from a Less Documented View in an Urban School Context
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6010006
Received: 11 November 2015 / Revised: 23 December 2015 / Accepted: 5 February 2016 / Published: 25 February 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (227 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Latina/o school leaders are receiving increasing visibility in research based on their representation in K-12 administrative ranks. However, even though they bring cultural knowledge in providing social and academic support to teachers, families, and especially students of color, their own experiences still reflect
[...] Read more.
Latina/o school leaders are receiving increasing visibility in research based on their representation in K-12 administrative ranks. However, even though they bring cultural knowledge in providing social and academic support to teachers, families, and especially students of color, their own experiences still reflect less documented histories and contributions because of challenges related to racial identity, racism, sexism, and other historically marginalizing emblems of identity, often invisible in the school leadership research and practice. This study highlights one Latina school leader in the National Latina/o Leadership Study and her experiences developing a professional and racial identity within urban school contexts. Employing Critical Race Theory and LatCrit Theory, this includes the following questions: (a) In what ways Latina/o school principals develop their professional and racial identity? and (b) How do Latina/o school principals negotiate these identities in the context of their schools? Findings reveal the development of a professional and racial identity amidst challenges related to White teachers’ resistance in preparing students of color for successful experiences in schools. Full article

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessConcept Paper Toward Culturally Sustaining Leadership: Innovation beyond ‘School Improvement’ Promoting Equity in Diverse Contexts
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6040033
Received: 8 August 2016 / Revised: 20 September 2016 / Accepted: 21 September 2016 / Published: 26 September 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (569 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Whilst school principals and educational leaders are increasingly constrained by standardized assessment results and student achievement, persistent achievement gaps continue to separate poor and historically underserved students from their wealthier mainstream peers in the United States (US) and similar countries. Unprecedented levels of
[...] Read more.
Whilst school principals and educational leaders are increasingly constrained by standardized assessment results and student achievement, persistent achievement gaps continue to separate poor and historically underserved students from their wealthier mainstream peers in the United States (US) and similar countries. Unprecedented levels of cultural, linguistic, ethnic, racial, and gender school diversity underscore these phenomena. As a result, leadership for ‘school improvement’ has become the norm and as evidenced by chronic academic disparities, ineffective. This review article considers culturally sustaining leadership as an innovative practice to promote and advance equity in schools. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEssay Culturally Sustaining Leadership: A Pacific Islander’s Perspective
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6010004
Received: 1 November 2015 / Revised: 12 January 2016 / Accepted: 5 February 2016 / Published: 18 February 2016
PDF Full-text (182 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Social justice in educational settings can be advanced through culturally sustaining leadership development programs for indigenous students, faculty, and administrators. The state of Hawai‘i has been a fertile ground for culture-based development experiences for emerging leaders from islands throughout the Pacific. These opportunities
[...] Read more.
Social justice in educational settings can be advanced through culturally sustaining leadership development programs for indigenous students, faculty, and administrators. The state of Hawai‘i has been a fertile ground for culture-based development experiences for emerging leaders from islands throughout the Pacific. These opportunities arise from the recognition of dissonance created by customary leadership programs which often give little or no attention to native cultures of the Pacific islands and prioritize other models. This essay highlights elements of my Chamoru culture that form the foundation of a culturally responsive leadership praxis within the context of American educational institutions. I offer this as an example that may help others develop their own culturally sustaining practices and inspire creation of leadership development programs which honor native cultures while facilitating effective professional practices in mainstream settings. Full article
Back to Top