Special Issue "Learner–Computer Interaction and Intelligent Tutoring Systems"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2022) | Viewed by 1904

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Christos Troussas
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Guest Editor
Department of Informatics and Computer Engineering, University of West Attica, Agiou Spiridonos 28, 12243 Egaleo, Greece
Interests: personalized software technology; human–computer interaction; intelligent and adaptive systems; user modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Akrivi Krouska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Informatics and Computer Engineering, University of West Attica, Agiou Spiridonos 28, Egaleo 12243, Greece
Interests: social networking services; sentiment analysis; learning analytics; user modeling; artificial intelligence in education
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Cleo Sgouropoulou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alexandra I. Cristea
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Computer Science, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, UK
Interests: adaptive, personalized web; applied AI; learner analytics; data analytics; semantic web; user modeling; web science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research in the field of learner–computer interaction (LCI) involves the analysis, implementation, and utilization of interactive technologies to enhance and boost knowledge acquisition. Indeed, e-learning is a multifaceted process that embodies several complex issues, such as human, software, information, and interaction. The field of LCI provides indispensable tools for building an educational environment which can be tailored to learners’ needs, preferences, and interests. This environment has to offer an adaptive and personalized learning experience to students in order to further modernize the educational process.

LCI is the common research ground for scientists of different fields, such as educational software and technology, human–machine communication, pedagogical sciences, and psychology.

LCI is the medium to develop novel and more sophisticated learning environments as well as to further support intelligent tutoring systems, enabling learning in a meaningful and effective way using a variety of computing technologies, and aiming to replicate the demonstrated benefits of one-to-one, personalized tutoring.

Despite the several research efforts that have been presented, there is fertile ground for more research in the field.

This Special Issue welcomes original research papers as well as review articles and short communications in the aforementioned area. Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

  • Learner–computer interaction;
  • Intelligent user interfaces;
  • Adaptive user interfaces;
  • Tangible interaction;
  • Intelligent tutoring systems;
  • Collaborative and group learning, communities of practice, and social networks;
  • Gamification, educational games, simulation-based learning, and serious games;
  • Adaptive educational hypermedia systems;
  • Educational robotics;
  • Human in the loop, understanding human learning on the web in a virtual (digital) world;
  • Personalized and adaptive learning environments;
  • Instructional design principles or design patterns for educational environments.

Dr. Christos Troussas
Dr. Akrivi Krouska
Prof. Dr. Cleo Sgouropoulou
Prof. Dr. Alexandra I. Cristea
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human–computer interaction
  • intelligent tutoring systems
  • educational software
  • learning management systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Improving Comprehension: Intelligent Tutoring System Explaining the Domain Rules When Students Break Them
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110719 - 09 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 551
Abstract
Intelligent tutoring systems have become increasingly common in assisting students but are often aimed at isolated subject-domain tasks without creating a scaffolding system from lower- to higher-level cognitive skills, with low-level skills often neglected. We designed and developed an intelligent tutoring system, CompPrehension, [...] Read more.
Intelligent tutoring systems have become increasingly common in assisting students but are often aimed at isolated subject-domain tasks without creating a scaffolding system from lower- to higher-level cognitive skills, with low-level skills often neglected. We designed and developed an intelligent tutoring system, CompPrehension, which aims to improve the comprehension level of Bloom’s taxonomy. The system features plug-in-based architecture, easily adding new subject domains and learning strategies. It uses formal models and software reasoners to solve the problems and judge the answers, and generates explanatory feedback about the broken domain rules and follow-up questions to stimulate the students’ thinking. We developed two subject domain models: an Expressions domain for teaching the expression order of evaluation, and a Control Flow Statements domain for code-tracing tasks. The chief novelty of our research is that the developed models are capable of automatic problem classification, determining the knowledge required to solve them and so the pedagogical conditions to use the problem without human participation. More than 100 undergraduate first-year Computer Science students took part in evaluating the system. The results in both subject domains show medium but statistically significant learning gains after using the system for a few days; students with worse previous knowledge gained more. In the Control Flow Statements domain, the number of completed questions correlates positively with the post-test grades and learning gains. The students’ survey showed a slightly positive perception of the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Learner–Computer Interaction and Intelligent Tutoring Systems)
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Article
Exploring Primary School Teachers’ Intention to Use E-Learning Tools during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 695; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110695 - 31 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 591
Abstract
It is commonly accepted that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a crucial effect on many aspects of people’s lives. The limitations placed on human relations have also affected education. The mandatory implementation of e-learning and the use of the information and communication technology [...] Read more.
It is commonly accepted that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a crucial effect on many aspects of people’s lives. The limitations placed on human relations have also affected education. The mandatory implementation of e-learning and the use of the information and communication technology tools in the teaching process have been the most important changes at all educational levels. However, the teaching staff plays a key role in every educational change. In this study, we examined the intention of elementary school teachers to use an e-learning platform. Our findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have found that teaching skills, teachers’ beliefs, and the appropriate infrastructure are all critical factors for the successful implementation of information technology in the educational process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Learner–Computer Interaction and Intelligent Tutoring Systems)
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