STEM Education for All: Breaking Barriers and Building Bridges

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "STEM Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2760

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-3027, USA
Interests: underserved students’ pathways into STEM studies and careers

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Guest Editor
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-3027, USA
Interests: engineering identity; idiographic experiences of engineering and K-12 students and their families with an emphasis on Black men

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Guest Editor
Engineering Undergraduate Programs, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-3027, USA
Interests: belonging, mentoring, and professional development of engineering undergraduate students; underrepresented and underserved student transitions into and out of engineering degrees

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together scholarship that investigate the critical transitions that students experience as they move through secondary school into postsecondary education and into a STEM career. We draw on research from both STEM education and higher education to define critical transitions as the changes students make from one phase of the educational process to the next as they progress toward their goal (Chang, Buonora, Stevens, & Kwon, 2016; Yosso & Solórzano, 2006). Etzkowitz and colleagues (2000) describe these moves as points when young people either may be drawn into a STEM pathway or may fall or be pushed out (e.g., introductory-level college courses that seek to ‘weed out’ certain students).

We invite high-quality original research that addresses timely issues relating to the critical transitions students go through in their pathway into STEM studies and careers, with a focus on broadening participation in STEM studies and careers. We are interested in research relating to P-20 STEM in the following areas:

  1. Policies that hinder or enhance student pathways into STEM (e.g., financial aid policies; university transfer policies; course requirements);
  2. Informal supports for underserved students (e.g., bridge programs, mentoring, summer camps);
  3. Instructor development (e.g., pre-service teacher education, professional development);
  4. Student motivational beliefs (e.g., student identity, self-efficacy).

We welcome quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods designs and research from across the globe.

Dr. Virginia Snodgrass Rangel
Dr. Jerrod A. Henderson
Dr. Daniel Burleson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • STEM pathways
  • broadening participation
  • STEM education

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 270 KiB  
Article
Transitioning to Success: The Link between E-CTE and College Preparation for Students with Learning Disabilities in the United States
by Jay S. Plasman, Filiz Oskay and Michael Gottfried
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14020116 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 921
Abstract
In recent years, there has been a specific call to not only increase the number of engineering-trained individuals but also to address the lack of diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, including individuals with disabilities. In particular, students with learning [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been a specific call to not only increase the number of engineering-trained individuals but also to address the lack of diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, including individuals with disabilities. In particular, students with learning disabilities (SWLDs) make up a large portion of all students and are, therefore, a crucial population on which to focus educational and career progression efforts. One potential means of promoting persistence along the STEM pipeline—engineering specifically—is through engineering career and technical education (E-CTE) coursework in high school. Using a nationally representative dataset, we explore how E-CTE participation links to college preparation and transition activities for SWLDs, including math SAT performance, dual credit course participation, college application, and FAFSA completion. Under our more rigorous school fixed-effects models, we find that E-CTE participation is associated with beneficial results across each of our outcomes. The implications are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue STEM Education for All: Breaking Barriers and Building Bridges)
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