Topical Collection "Interesting Images from the Sea"

A topical collection in Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This collection belongs to the section "Marine Diversity".

Editors

Prof. Dr. Bert W. Hoeksema
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Collection Editor
1. Taxonomy and Systematics Group, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, P.O. Box 9517, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands
2. Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands
Interests: stony corals; coral-associated fauna; coral reef conservation; coral taxonomy; coral trade; tropical marine biodiversity; marine invertebrates; marine biogeography; phylogeny reconstructions; marine invasives
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Zoe Richards
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
1. School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Curtin University, Kent St, Bentley, WA 6102 Australia
2. Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, Perth Cultural Centre, Perth, WA 6000, Australia
Interests: coral reef; Cnidaria; monitoring; phylogenetics; Scleractinia; taxonomy; systematics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Underwater photographers and aquarists produce many attractive pictures that may tell an interesting story. Most of these pictures are posted on websites and social media where they have little scientific relevance. They could also serve as basis for published observations in Diversity (as Interesting Images), which may lead to new scientific insights and hypotheses. Therefore, Diversity encourages the submission of such Interesting Images. A simple manuscript text (without introduction/methods/results/discussion) should be included, as a short note, preceded by an abstract (max 100 words), a maximum of seven keywords, and followed by the author statements up to 20 references. There is no limit to the number of illustrations (which can be arranged as panels in Figures with captions), but they should all be relevant and of good quality. Video footage may be included as Electronic Supplementary Material. Image files can be included either in the template or uploaded separately in high resolution. There are no restrictions on use of color or image size; however, features should be sharp and not blurred. For readability, we recommend that any text in figures is at least 12 pt in size. Submitted images will be peer-reviewed under the same process as a regular research article.

Other relevant "Interesting images" in Diversity, please click here.

Prof. Dr. Bert W. Hoeksema
Dr. Zoe Richards
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • animal behaviour
  • associated species
  • commensalism
  • distribution record
  • interspecific relations
  • life history
  • mutualism
  • parasitism
  • predator-prey relations
  • rarity
  • reproduction mechanism
  • species aggregations
  • unusual habitat

Published Papers (10 papers)

2022

Jump to: 2021, 2020

Interesting Images
One on Top of the Other: Exploring the Habitat Cascades Phenomenon in Iconic Biogenic Marine Habitats
Diversity 2022, 14(4), 290; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14040290 - 12 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 816
Abstract
Biogenic habitats often form hot spots of biodiversity. However, the role of epibiosis and the ‘habitat cascades’ phenomenon in enhancing structural heterogeneity and biodiversity in biogenic habitats in remote and difficult-to-access areas is little known. In this work, we provide the first insight [...] Read more.
Biogenic habitats often form hot spots of biodiversity. However, the role of epibiosis and the ‘habitat cascades’ phenomenon in enhancing structural heterogeneity and biodiversity in biogenic habitats in remote and difficult-to-access areas is little known. In this work, we provide the first insight by exploring epibiosis across remote habitats that often support high levels of biodiversity, i.e., cold-water coral reefs and marine caves. The present study acts as a stepping-stone for the further exploration of ‘habitat cascades’ in habitats where scientific knowledge about this phenomenon is limited. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Interesting Images
Seahorse Predation by Octopuses in the Caribbean and the West Pacific
Diversity 2022, 14(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14020125 - 10 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1230
Abstract
There is much documentation about seahorses (Hippocampus spp.) being threatened by habitat degradation and overfishing, but relatively few published studies mention their natural predators. The present study documents three cases in which seahorses are being caught by octopuses. In one case, the [...] Read more.
There is much documentation about seahorses (Hippocampus spp.) being threatened by habitat degradation and overfishing, but relatively few published studies mention their natural predators. The present study documents three cases in which seahorses are being caught by octopuses. In one case, the seahorse was partly consumed. These observations made at Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and New South Wales (Australia) suggest that predation on seahorses by octopuses may be more widespread and common than previously thought. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Interesting Images
Alveopora japonica Conquering Temperate Reefs despite Massive Coral Bleaching
Diversity 2022, 14(2), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14020086 - 26 Jan 2022
Viewed by 836
Abstract
Alveopora japonica is restricted to the Asia-Pacific region, ranging from subtropical to temperate waters. In 2016, a massive bleaching event of an A. japonica population was observed at the south coast of Jeju Island, South Korea, which is within its northernmost limit. After [...] Read more.
Alveopora japonica is restricted to the Asia-Pacific region, ranging from subtropical to temperate waters. In 2016, a massive bleaching event of an A. japonica population was observed at the south coast of Jeju Island, South Korea, which is within its northernmost limit. After the bleaching event, most of the colonies had recovered by 2017. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2021

Jump to: 2022, 2020

Interesting Images
The Reef Coral Coscinaraea marshae Is Not a High-Latitude Endemic
Diversity 2021, 13(12), 681; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13120681 - 19 Dec 2021
Viewed by 789
Abstract
The ‘temperate’ reef coral Coscinaraea marshae Wells, 1962, is reported from Siberut Island (West Sumatra, Indonesia), a near-equatorial locality, 3375 km away from its northernmost range limit in Western Australia, where it is considered a high-latitude endemic. This tropical record suggests that the [...] Read more.
The ‘temperate’ reef coral Coscinaraea marshae Wells, 1962, is reported from Siberut Island (West Sumatra, Indonesia), a near-equatorial locality, 3375 km away from its northernmost range limit in Western Australia, where it is considered a high-latitude endemic. This tropical record suggests that the latitudinal distributions of poorly recorded reef corals may not yet be fully understood, which might be relevant in the light of progressing seawater warming. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Interesting Images
Unusual Morphotypes of the Giant Barrel Sponge off the Coast of Barbados
Diversity 2021, 13(12), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13120663 - 12 Dec 2021
Viewed by 952
Abstract
Giant barrel sponges (GBSs) belong to a cryptic species complex (Xestospongia spp.) and are found on tropical reefs worldwide. Over their range, including most of the Caribbean, GBSs have a cylindrical shape, with variation in height, diameter and surface complexity. However, off [...] Read more.
Giant barrel sponges (GBSs) belong to a cryptic species complex (Xestospongia spp.) and are found on tropical reefs worldwide. Over their range, including most of the Caribbean, GBSs have a cylindrical shape, with variation in height, diameter and surface complexity. However, off the southwest coast of Barbados, GBSs mostly exhibit a clam shape or a tub shape, interspersed with a few that have the normal barrel morphotype, suggesting that this variation is not due to environmental factors. Haplotype identification (mtDNA-COI) of six clam and six normal sponges indicated no clear genetic differentiation based on morphotype; hence, this morphological variation remains unexplained. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Interesting Images
Crustaceans and Marine Heterobranchia: A New Symbiotic Relationship in the Mediterranean Sea
Diversity 2021, 13(12), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13120613 - 24 Nov 2021
Viewed by 752
Abstract
The “solar-powered” Elysia timida (Risso, 1818) is an endemic Mediterranean sacoglossan living in rocky substrates at shallow water. During a scuba dive, one E. timida was photographed and collected. The observation revealed the presence of a small crustacean of the Pinnotheridae family. It [...] Read more.
The “solar-powered” Elysia timida (Risso, 1818) is an endemic Mediterranean sacoglossan living in rocky substrates at shallow water. During a scuba dive, one E. timida was photographed and collected. The observation revealed the presence of a small crustacean of the Pinnotheridae family. It was not possible to assign the crustacean to a genus, but it shares typical ecological and external morphological features with other Pinnotherinae species. This is the first report of a pea crab hosted by a non-shelled Heterobranchia and the first case of a symbiotic association between crustaceans and marine Heterobranchia reported in the Mediterranean Sea. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Interesting Images
Salpivory by Colonial Reef Corals at Curaçao, Southern Caribbean
Diversity 2021, 13(11), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13110560 - 03 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 590
Abstract
A salp swarm was observed in Director’s Bay, Curaçao in July 2021, where salps were caught and consumed by three scleractinian colonial reef corals: Madracis auretenra, Locke, Weil & Coates, 2017; Meandrina meandrites (Linnaeus, 1758), and Montastraea cavernosa (Linnaeus, 1767). The first two [...] Read more.
A salp swarm was observed in Director’s Bay, Curaçao in July 2021, where salps were caught and consumed by three scleractinian colonial reef corals: Madracis auretenra, Locke, Weil & Coates, 2017; Meandrina meandrites (Linnaeus, 1758), and Montastraea cavernosa (Linnaeus, 1767). The first two scleractinians are newly recorded salpivores. Since the coral polyps were collaborating, predation was not restricted by polyp size. This is the first detailed report on salpivorous corals in the Caribbean. Full article
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Figure 1

Interesting Images
If You Plant It, They Will Come: Rapid Recruitment of Habitat-Dependent Marine Invertebrates to Transplanted Fragments of an Endangered Soft Coral Species
Diversity 2021, 13(2), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13020079 - 15 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1152
Abstract
In recent decades, the transplantation of corals has been a primary focus of restoration strategies in areas where coral populations have declined [...] Full article
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Figure 1

2020

Jump to: 2022, 2021

Interesting Images
The First In Situ Observation of the Ram’s Horn Squid Spirula spirula Turns “Common Knowledge” Upside Down
Diversity 2020, 12(12), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120449 - 27 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3101
Abstract
The ram’s horn squid Spirula spirula (Linnaeus, 1758) is the only extant cephalopod with an internal calcareous, chambered shell that is coiled, making it the sole living representative of the once speciose order Spirulida [...] Full article
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Figure 1

Interesting Images
New Records of Heliopora hiberniana from SE Asia and the Central Indian Ocean
Diversity 2020, 12(9), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090328 - 28 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1199
Abstract
Coral reefs are among the most diverse ecosystems on the planet [...] Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

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