Special Issue "High-Mountain Lakes, Indicators of Global Change: Ecological Characterization and Environmental Pressures"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity Loss & Dynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Paolo Pastorino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle d'Aosta, Turin, Italy
Interests: aquaculture; fish biology; fish diseases; ecotoxicology; freshwater ecosystems; antibiotic resistance; trace elements; emerging contaminants; microplastics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Marino Prearo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle d'Aosta, Turin, Italy
Interests: fish and shellfish diseases; aquaculture; freshwater ecosystems; environmental contaminants; ecotoxicology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diversity is launching a Special Issue dedicated to high-mountain lakes, focused on their ecological characterization and environmental pressures.

Though mountain lakes are generally much less influenced by human activities than other habitats, global and local anthropogenic threats can alter their natural condition. The most alarming threats are water exploitation, alien species introduction, climate change, and medium–long range atmospheric transport of contaminates. Originally fishless because they are isolated ecosystems, high-mountain lakes are sensitive to ecological damage caused by the invasion of alien species. The low taxon richness suggests that these habitats are not species saturated and are susceptible to invasive species or species that are expanding their ranges due to climate change. The threat to biodiversity is greater due to the low diversity and structure of such communities. Moreover, tourism and mountain farming are two other major sources of organic pollutants that can pose a local threat to aquatic biodiversity. Papers submitted this Special Issue should be original contributions focused on the ecological and morphological characterization, environmental pressures (i.e., alien species introduction, environmental contaminates), and use of bioindicators/tracers that will contribute to supporting adequate management plans.

Dr. Paolo Pastorino
Dr.  Marino Prearo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental contaminants
  • Climate change
  • Alien species
  • Hydrochemistry
  • Bioindicators
  • Paleolimnology

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Editorial
High-Mountain Lakes, Indicators of Global Change: Ecological Characterization and Environmental Pressures
Diversity 2020, 12(6), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12060260 - 26 Jun 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1123
Abstract
Though mountain lakes are generally much less influenced by human activities than other habitats, global and local anthropogenic threats can alter their natural condition. The most alarming threats are climate change, water exploitation and abstraction, alien species introduction, and the medium-long range atmospheric [...] Read more.
Though mountain lakes are generally much less influenced by human activities than other habitats, global and local anthropogenic threats can alter their natural condition. The most alarming threats are climate change, water exploitation and abstraction, alien species introduction, and the medium-long range atmospheric transport of contaminates. Moreover, tourism and mountain farming are two other major sources of organic pollutants that can pose a threat to local aquatic biodiversity. Papers submitted to this Special Issue should be original contributions, with a focus on ecological and morphological characterization, environmental pressures (i.e., alien species introduction, environmental contaminates), and the use of bioindicators/tracers to inform adequate management plans. Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
Responses of Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities of Two Tropical, High-Mountain Lakes to Climate Change and Deacidification
Diversity 2021, 13(6), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13060243 - 31 May 2021
Viewed by 605
Abstract
High-mountain lakes are among the most comparable ecosystems globally and recognized sentinels of global change. The present study pursued to identify how the benthic macroinvertebrates (BMI) communities of two tropical, high mountain lakes, El Sol and La Luna, Central Mexico, have been affected [...] Read more.
High-mountain lakes are among the most comparable ecosystems globally and recognized sentinels of global change. The present study pursued to identify how the benthic macroinvertebrates (BMI) communities of two tropical, high mountain lakes, El Sol and La Luna, Central Mexico, have been affected by global/regional environmental pressures. We compared the environmental characteristics and the BMI communities between 2000–2001 and 2017–2018. We identified three principal environmental changes (the air and water temperature increased, the lakes’ water level declined, and the pH augmented and became more variable), and four principal ecological changes in the BMI communities [a species richness reduction (7 to 4), a composition change, and a dominant species replacement all of them in Lake El Sol, a species richness increase (2 to 4) in Lake La Luna, and a drastic reduction in density (38% and 90%) and biomass (92%) in both lakes]. The air and water temperature increased 0.5 °C, and lakes water level declined 1.5 m, all suggesting an outcome of climate change. Contrarily to the expected acidification associated with acid precipitation, both lakes deacidified, and the annual pH fluctuation augmented. The causes of the deacidification and the deleterious impacts on the BMI communities remained to be identified. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Liver Lipid Accumulation in European Bullhead (Cottus cobio) from a High-Mountain Lake: An Adaptive Strategy to Survive the Adverse Winter Season
Diversity 2020, 12(12), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120442 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 635
Abstract
The hypothesis that liver lipid accumulation in fish is an adaptive strategy to survive the winter in the high-altitude environment was assessed in this study. During summer 2019, specimens of Cottus gobio were sampled in 15 watercourses of Friuli Venezia-Giulia Region (Italy) to [...] Read more.
The hypothesis that liver lipid accumulation in fish is an adaptive strategy to survive the winter in the high-altitude environment was assessed in this study. During summer 2019, specimens of Cottus gobio were sampled in 15 watercourses of Friuli Venezia-Giulia Region (Italy) to verify if hepatic steatosis is or not normally present in the species. To do this, hepatic vacuolization was assessed by histology using a semiquantitative score. Furthermore, C. gobio were also captured during the ice-free season at Dimon Lake (1872 m a.s.l.) and But Stream (520 m a.s.l.) to compare the trend in lipid accumulation: water temperature, hepatosomatic index (HSI), gonadosomatic index (GSI), Fulton’s condition factor (K), and lipid area percentage (lipid %) were measured monthly. Findings revealed that liver steatosis is rather common in C. gobio. However, the trend in lipid accumulation of this species differed between Dimon Lake and But Stream. Based on the HSI and the GSI, the reproductive cycles differed in fish from the two environments (April–May in But Stream; May–June in Dimon Lake). While K values remained unchanged in the But Stream specimens, significant changes were recorded for Dimon specimens. The increase in lipid % from July to August in the Dimon Lake specimens coincided with greater food availability. With the rapid drop in lake water temperature in October, the lipid % decreased due to slower metabolic rate and lipid utilization from liver stores. There was a slight decrease in lipid % in the But Stream specimens, indicating that lipids were not being accumulated. Introduced years ago, the Dimon Lake bullhead population has since adapted to the winter conditions at high elevation. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop