Special Issue "Innovative Diagnostics Tools in Physiotherapy: from the Laboratory to the Clinical Setting"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco Alburquerque-Sendín
Website
Guest Editor
Physiotherapy Section, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of Córdoba, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: research methodology; physical therapy; manual therapy; kinematics; musculoskeletal pain
Dr. César Fernández-de-las-Peñas
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Madrid, Spain
Interests: chronic pain; pain neuroscience education, manual therapy; central nervous system sensitization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Proper diagnosis in physical therapy is a challenging step before the application of any clinical procedure. The evidence-based physical therapy paradigm has established the patterns of a well-grounded practice, and the diagnosis and monitoring of the status and the evaluation of the patients are also submitted to the highest standardized rules.

Currently, the broad spectrum of pathologies and syndromes requiring physical therapy attention has been increased. Nevertheless, an adequate support of proper and valuable diagnostic procedures is not always available.

Recently, technological and non-technological tools have been developed with promising approaches in health care and, specifically, in physiotherapy. Some examples include movement analyses throughout portable or non-portable devices, such as inertial measurement units, cameras, or smartphones; and the evaluation of normal tissue mechanical properties determined by elastography, ultrasound, or myotonometry. Examples of non-technological tools include the identification of clinical features (clinical prediction rules) for anticipating the results of defined treatments; specific questionnaires designed to address pathological features of chronic pain syndromes; or patient classification systems for a better definition of the most disabling syndromes, such as low back pain or fibromyalgia.

In summary, this Special Issue targets any innovative solution for a better detection, quantification, or control of any relevant biopsychosocial dimensions for physical therapy in clinical setting application.

Prof. Francisco Alburquerque-Sendín
Prof. César Fernández-de-las-Peñas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innovative diagnostic tools
  • physical therapy diagnosis
  • diagnosis in clinical settings
  • biopsychosocial model evaluation tools

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Does the Keele STarT Back Screening Tool Contribute to Effectiveness in Treatment and Cost and Loss of Follow-Up of the Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy for Patients with Low Back Pain?
Diagnostics 2020, 10(8), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080536 - 30 Jul 2020
Abstract
Background: Mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT) and the stratified approach using the Keele STarT Back Screening Tool (SBST) are examples of stratified low back pain (LBP) management. We investigated whether the medium–high risk in SBST can contribute to the time and sessions until [...] Read more.
Background: Mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT) and the stratified approach using the Keele STarT Back Screening Tool (SBST) are examples of stratified low back pain (LBP) management. We investigated whether the medium–high risk in SBST can contribute to the time and sessions until discharge from MDT (Question 1) and to the loss of follow-up before identifying a promising management strategy (Question 2). Methods: A retrospective chart study was conducted. Multiple regression modeling was constructed using 10 independent variables, including whether the SBST was medium–high risk or not for Question 1, and the 9/10 independent variables for Question 2. Results: The data of 89 participants for Question 1 and 166 participants for Question 2 were analyzed. SBST was not a primary contributing factor for Question 1 (R2 = 0.17–0.19). The model for Question 2 included SBST as a primary contributing factor and the shortest distance from the patient address to the hospital as a secondary contributing factor (93.4% correct classification). Conclusion: SBST status was not a primary contributing factor for time and sessions until discharge from MDT, but was a critical factor for the loss of MDT follow-up before identifying a promising management strategy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Concurrent Validity of Digital Vascular Auscultation for the Assessment of Blood Flow Obliteration on the Radial Artery in Healthy Subjects
Diagnostics 2020, 10(7), 494; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10070494 - 18 Jul 2020
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the validity of digital vascular auscultation for the assessment of changes in the radial pulse in healthy subjects, using Doppler sonography as a validated test referent. Sixty-one non-symptomatic subjects (mean age of 52.5 ± 16.1 years) were assigned [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the validity of digital vascular auscultation for the assessment of changes in the radial pulse in healthy subjects, using Doppler sonography as a validated test referent. Sixty-one non-symptomatic subjects (mean age of 52.5 ± 16.1 years) were assigned and evaluated under one of the following conditions: In condition 1, blood flow of the radial artery was not modified; for condition 2, blood flow of the radial artery was modified using a pressure sleeve around the humerus. The radial pulse was then measured three times with each diagnostic tool by three different blinded evaluators. Both instruments demonstrated a high association between the identification of blood flow modifications or not and the assigned condition (p < 0.001). A strong concordance between the two devices when detecting the “changes” or “no changes” in blood flow was demonstrated (k = 0.936, p < 0.001). Stethoscope sensitivity was 95%, and specificity was 99%. In conclusion, digital vascular auscultation seems to be a valid technique to examine blood flow changes of the radial artery in non-symptomatic subjects, and it could be useful for physical therapists when combined with provocative tests for the screening of possible thoracic outlet syndrome in patients. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Measuring Spinal Mobility Using an Inertial Measurement Unit System: A Validation Study in Axial Spondyloarthritis
Diagnostics 2020, 10(6), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10060426 - 24 Jun 2020
Abstract
Portable inertial measurement units (IMUs) are beginning to be used in human motion analysis. These devices can be useful for the evaluation of spinal mobility in individuals with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). The objectives of this study were to assess (a) concurrent criterion validity [...] Read more.
Portable inertial measurement units (IMUs) are beginning to be used in human motion analysis. These devices can be useful for the evaluation of spinal mobility in individuals with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). The objectives of this study were to assess (a) concurrent criterion validity in individuals with axSpA by comparing spinal mobility measured by an IMU sensor-based system vs. optical motion capture as the reference standard; (b) discriminant validity comparing mobility with healthy volunteers; (c) construct validity by comparing mobility results with relevant outcome measures. A total of 70 participants with axSpA and 20 healthy controls were included. Individuals with axSpA completed function and activity questionnaires, and their mobility was measured using conventional metrology for axSpA, an optical motion capture system, and an IMU sensor-based system. The UCOASMI, a metrology index based on measures obtained by motion capture, and the IUCOASMI, the same index using IMU measures, were also calculated. Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted to show the relationships between outcome measures. There was excellent agreement (ICC > 0.90) between both systems and a significant correlation between the IUCOASMI and conventional metrology (r = 0.91), activity (r = 0.40), function (r = 0.62), quality of life (r = 0.55) and structural change (r = 0.76). This study demonstrates the validity of an IMU system to evaluate spinal mobility in axSpA. These systems are more feasible than optical motion capture systems, and they could be useful in clinical practice. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Prediction Model of Soleus Muscle Depth Based on Anthropometric Features: Potential Applications for Dry Needling
Diagnostics 2020, 10(5), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10050284 - 07 May 2020
Abstract
This study was conducted to investigate if anthropometric features can predict the depth of the soleus muscle, as assessed with ultrasound imaging, in a sample of healthy individuals to assist clinicians in the application of dry needling. A diagnostic study to calculate the [...] Read more.
This study was conducted to investigate if anthropometric features can predict the depth of the soleus muscle, as assessed with ultrasound imaging, in a sample of healthy individuals to assist clinicians in the application of dry needling. A diagnostic study to calculate the accuracy of a prediction model for soleus muscle depth, as assessed with ultrasonography, in the middle-third and distal-third of the calf, based on anthropometric features such as age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), calf length, mid-third and distal-third calf girth, was conducted on 48 asymptomatic healthy subjects (75% male) involving a total of 96 calves. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine which variables contributed significantly to the variance in the soleus muscle depth at middle-third and distal-third of the calf by gender. Women were found to have a deeper soleus muscle than men (p < 0.001). Weight, height, BMI, and mid-third calf perimeter explained 69.9% of variance in men, whereas mid-third calf perimeter, calf length, height, and distal-third calf girth explained 73% of the variance in women of the distal-third soleus depth (p < 0.001). Additionally, mid-third calf girth and calf length explained 28.8% of variance in men, whereas mid-third calf perimeter, calf length, and weight explained 67.8% of variance in women of the mid-third soleus depth (p < 0.001). This study identified anthropometric features that predict soleus muscle depth, as assessed with ultrasound, in asymptomatic individuals, but these features are different in men and women. Our findings could assist clinicians in choosing the proper length of the needle to avoiding passing through the soleus during dry needling. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Dance Functional Outcome Survey (DFOS) for Spanish Dancers
Diagnostics 2020, 10(3), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10030169 - 20 Mar 2020
Abstract
A growing number of research papers regarding Spanish-speaking dancers justifies the need for an adapted Spanish version of the Dance Functional Outcome Survey (DFOS). The objective of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the DFOS for Spanish-speaking dancers. A sample of [...] Read more.
A growing number of research papers regarding Spanish-speaking dancers justifies the need for an adapted Spanish version of the Dance Functional Outcome Survey (DFOS). The objective of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the DFOS for Spanish-speaking dancers. A sample of 127 healthy and injured professional and pre-professional dancers were recruited. Test-retest reliability of DFOS-Sp was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients. Construct validity compared DFOS-Sp to the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) using Pearson correlations. Principal component analysis identified factors and internal-item consistency. Sensitivity was evaluated by generating receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve analyses. A subgroup of 51 injured dancers were followed across three time-points to examine responsiveness using repeated measures analysis of variance. Injured scores were analyzed for floor and ceiling effects. The DFOS-Sp showed high test-retest reliability (ICC2,1 ≥ 0.92). DFOS-Sp scores had moderate construct validity compared with SF-36 physical component summary scores (r ≥ 0.56). Principal component analysis (PCA) supported uni-dimensionality explaining 58% of the variance with high internal consistency (α = 0.91).Area under the curve (AUC) sensitivity values were excellent (AUC ≥ 0.82). There were significant differences across time (p < 0.001), demonstrating responsiveness to change, with no floor or ceiling effects. The DFOS-Sp demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability and validity in Spanish-speaking dancers, with comparable psychometric performance to the English-language version. Full article
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