Advances in Diagnostic and Operative Hysteroscopy

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging and Theranostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 5677

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

This Special Issue of Diagnostics, an open access journal, on the topic of “Advances in Diagnostic and Operative Hysteroscopy” will publish a broad range of original papers covering the full spectrum of the hysteroscopic technique. Hysteroscopy is a valuable tool in modern minimally invasive gynecologic surgery; as such, the journal invites high-quality submissions on current research and review articles, shedding light on controversies and on clinical practice. In addition to research and reviews, it also welcomes meta-analyses, practice guidelines, and more.

Topics of interest include general gynecology, infertility, pediatric and adolescent gynecology, mullerian anomalies, gynecologic oncology, pelvic medicine, pros and cons of various hysteroscopic techniques, and more. The issue focuses on the diagnosis, prediction, prevention, and treatment of various gynecological disorders.

As our audience is global, the aim of this issue is to play a major role in education in hysteroscopy, throughout Europe and around the world.

Dr. Panagiotis Christopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hysteroscopy
  • diagnosis
  • technique
  • malformation
  • uterus
  • endometrial
  • anomaly
  • minimally invasive
  • pathology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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10 pages, 6997 KiB  
Review
Diagnosis and Treatment of Adenomyosis with Office Hysteroscopy—A Narrative Review of Literature
by Fani Gkrozou, Anastasia Vatopoulou, Chara Skentou and Minas Paschopoulos
Diagnostics 2023, 13(13), 2182; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics13132182 - 27 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3785
Abstract
Introduction: Adenomyosis is a common chronic disease in women of reproductive age, characterised by the presence of ectopic endometrial tissue within myometrium. Even though adenomyosis presents with chronic pelvic pain, menorrhagia or abnormal uterine bleeding, dysmenorrhoea, and dyspareunia and is often recognised after [...] Read more.
Introduction: Adenomyosis is a common chronic disease in women of reproductive age, characterised by the presence of ectopic endometrial tissue within myometrium. Even though adenomyosis presents with chronic pelvic pain, menorrhagia or abnormal uterine bleeding, dysmenorrhoea, and dyspareunia and is often recognised after hysterectomies. However, the development of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved the pre-operative diagnosis of the disease. Hysteroscopy provides information in real time from the uterine cavity and the offers the possibility of obtaining direct biopsies. Material and Methods: The literature was searched via Pubmed and Embase with the following headings: diagnosis of adenomyosis or adenomyoma and office hysteroscopy, hysteroscopy findings of adenomyosis or adenomyoma, treatment of adenomyosis or adenomyoma with office hysteroscopy. Results: The literature showed that hysteroscopy can identify superficial adenomyosis. There are a variety of hysteroscopic images that can be connected with the disease. New equipment like the spirotome has been used to access deeper layers of myometrium and obtain biopsies under direct vision from the adenomyotic areas. Different methods of treatment have been also described, like enucleation of focal superficial adenomyoma, coagulation, evacuation of cystic adenomyosis when the lesion is smaller than 1.5 cm, and resection of adenomyotic nodules in case of bigger lesions (>1.5 cm). Diffuse superficial adenomyosis is also managed by resection. Conclusions: Hysteroscopy has revolutionised the approach to adenomyosis. It is a useful tool in assessing mainly superficial adenomyosis. The role of hysteroscopy in surgical management of adenomyosis need to be confirmed with further studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Diagnostic and Operative Hysteroscopy)
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18 pages, 656 KiB  
Systematic Review
Use of Diode Laser in Hysteroscopy for the Management of Intrauterine Pathology: A Systematic Review
by Andrea Etrusco, Giovanni Buzzaccarini, Antonio Simone Laganà, Vito Chiantera, Salvatore Giovanni Vitale, Stefano Angioni, Maurizio Nicola D’Alterio, Luigi Nappi, Felice Sorrentino, Amerigo Vitagliano, Tommaso Difonzo, Gaetano Riemma, Liliana Mereu, Alessandro Favilli, Panagiotis Peitsidis and Antonio D’Amato
Diagnostics 2024, 14(3), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14030327 - 2 Feb 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1398
Abstract
Background: Hysteroscopy currently represents the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of intrauterine pathologies. Recent technological progress has enabled the integration of diagnostic and operative time, leading to the “see and treat” approach. Diode laser technology is emerging as one of the [...] Read more.
Background: Hysteroscopy currently represents the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of intrauterine pathologies. Recent technological progress has enabled the integration of diagnostic and operative time, leading to the “see and treat” approach. Diode laser technology is emerging as one of the most innovative and intriguing techniques in this context. Methods: A comprehensive search of the literature was carried out on the main databases. Only original studies reporting the treatment of intrauterine pathologies using diode laser were deemed eligible for inclusion in this systematic review (PROSPERO ID: CRD42023485452). Results: Eight studies were included in the qualitative analysis for a total of 474 patients undergoing laser hysteroscopic surgery. Eighty-three patients had female genital tract abnormalities, 63 had submucosal leiomyomas, 327 had endometrial polyps, and one patient had a scar pregnancy. Except for leiomyomas, whose technique already included two surgical times at the beginning, only seven patients required a second surgical step. Cumulative rates of intraoperative and postoperative complications of 2.7% and 0.6%, respectively, were reported. Conclusions: Diode laser through “see and treat” hysteroscopy appears to be a safe and effective method. However, additional studies with larger sample sizes and improved designs are needed to consolidate the evidence currently available in the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Diagnostic and Operative Hysteroscopy)
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