Special Issue "Advances in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Head and Neck Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2022 | Viewed by 2390

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dimitra P. Vageli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Yale Larynx Laboratory, Department of Surgery (Otolaryngology), Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
Interests: bile reflux; carcinogens; NF-kappa B; STAT3 transcription factor; DNA mismatch repair; laryngopharyngeal reflux; squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Head and neck cancer account for about 4% of all cancers in The United States. However, it is estimated that approximately 66,630 new cases (48,740 men and 17,890 women) and 14,620 deaths (10,640 men and 3980 women) from head and neck cancer will occur in the United States in 2021. From a clinical perspective, laryngopharyngeal tumors, which account for almost 50% of all head and neck cancers (HNSCC), are very aggressive, causing high levels of functional morbidity and mortality, with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 60% and are therefore considered among the most devastating cancers. Known risk factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and HPV16 infection have been associated with HNSCC. Additional risk factors, such as laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), have also been linked to the disease. The pathogenesis of HNSCC and its therapeutic targeting strategies require further investigation. Identifying and characterizing the mechanism of the neoplastic process that is activated under the influence of variable risk factors would ultimately allow a more comprehensive risk stratification and prevention of HNSCC, such as laryngopharyngeal cancer or its recurrences, including the development of therapeutic strategies.

In this Special Issue of Current Oncology, we invite research reports focused on new advances on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) risk factors, prevention, and novel therapy; specifically, these topics may include:

  • HNSCC epidemiology;
  • HNSCC etiopathogenesis and prevention;
  • HNSCC novel targets and biomarkers;
  • Advances of HNSCC therapeutic strategies.

Dr. Dimitra P. Vageli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • head and neck carcinogenesis
  • laryngopharyngeal cancer
  • hypopharyngeal cancer
  • cause, prevention, and therapy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Effect of Tobacco Smoke N-Nitrosamines, NNK and NDEA, and Nicotine, on DNA Mismatch Repair Mechanism and miRNA Markers, in Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: An In Vivo Model and Clinical Evidence
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(8), 5531-5549; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29080437 - 04 Aug 2022
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Abstract
Deregulation of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism has been linked to poor prognosis of upper aerodigestive tract cancers. Our recent in vitro data have provided evidence of crosstalk between deregulated miRNAs and MMR genes, caused by tobacco smoke (TS) N-Nitrosamines, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone [...] Read more.
Deregulation of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism has been linked to poor prognosis of upper aerodigestive tract cancers. Our recent in vitro data have provided evidence of crosstalk between deregulated miRNAs and MMR genes, caused by tobacco smoke (TS) N-Nitrosamines, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), in hypopharyngeal cells. Here, we explored whether chronic exposure to TS components can affect MMR mechanism and miRNA profiles in hypopharyngeal mucosa. Using a mouse model (C57Bl/6J wild type) of in vivo 14-week exposure to NNK (0.2 mmol/L) and N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA; 0.004 mmol/L), with or without nicotine (0.02 μmol/L), we provide direct evidence that TS components can promote dysplasia, significant downregulation of Msh2 and Mlh1 genes and deregulation of miR-21, miR-155, miR-34a, and miR-451a. By analyzing eight human specimens from tobacco smokers and eight controls, we provide clinical evidence of a significant reduction in hMSH2 and hMLH1 mRNAs in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC). In summary, deregulation of the MMR mechanism and miRNAs is caused by chronic exposure to TS-related N-Nitrosamines, with or without nicotine, in the early stages of upper aerodigestive tract carcinogenesis, and can also be detected in human HSCC. Thus, we encourage future studies to further elucidate a possible in vivo dose-dependent effect of individual or combined N-Nitrosamines, NNK and/or NDEA, and nicotine, on the MMR mechanism and their clinical testing to elaborate prognosis and risk assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck)
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Review

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Review
Current and Future Biomarkers for Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(6), 4185-4198; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29060334 - 08 Jun 2022
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Abstract
With the introduction of immunotherapy, significant improvement has been made in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, only a small subset of patients with HNSCC benefit from immunotherapy. The current biomarker, a programmed cell death protein ligand 1 [...] Read more.
With the introduction of immunotherapy, significant improvement has been made in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, only a small subset of patients with HNSCC benefit from immunotherapy. The current biomarker, a programmed cell death protein ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression that is widely used in treatment decision making for advanced HNSCC, has only a moderate predictive value. Additionally, PD-L1-based assay has critical inherent limitations due to its highly dynamic nature and lack of standardization. With the advance in molecular techniques and our understanding of biology, more reliable, reproducible, and practical novel biomarkers are being developed. These include but are not limited to neoantigen/mutation characteristics, immune transcriptomes, tumor-infiltrating immune cell composition, cancer epigenomic, proteomics and metabolic characteristics, and plasma-based and organoid assays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck)
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Review
Micro-RNAs, the Cornerstones of the Future of Radiobiology in Head and Neck Cancers?
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(2), 816-833; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29020069 - 02 Feb 2022
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Abstract
Even though it is only the 6th most common malignancy at the modal level, head and neck cancers are distinguished by a considerable treatment failure rate, especially by locoregional recurrences, the intrinsic tumor radioresistance being one of the causes of this phenomenon. The [...] Read more.
Even though it is only the 6th most common malignancy at the modal level, head and neck cancers are distinguished by a considerable treatment failure rate, especially by locoregional recurrences, the intrinsic tumor radioresistance being one of the causes of this phenomenon. The efforts of radiobiological research of these cancers are oriented towards the identification of biomarkers associated with radioresistance and radiosensitivity in order to modulate the treatment so that the therapeutic benefit is maximum. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs, miRs), small single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules are currently being extensively evaluated as potential biomarkers in numerous diseases, including cancer. The evaluation of the potential of miRNAs to modulate or predict radiosensitivity or radioresistance, to anticipate the risk of recurrence and metastasis, and to differentiate different tumor subtypes is based on multiple mechanisms by which mRNAs control proliferation and apoptosis and interact with cell cycle phases or act as oncogenes with the potential to influence invasion promotion or tumor suppression. A refinement of radiosensitivity based on miRNAs with clinical and radiobiological application in head and neck cancers can lead to a personalization of radiotherapy. Thus, a miRNA signature can anticipate the risk of toxicity associated with chemoradiation, the possibility of obtaining locoregional control after treatment, and the recurrence and distant metastasis risk. The potential of miRNAs as an intrinsic predictor of sensitivity to chemotherapy may also guide the therapeutic decision toward choosing an escalation or de-escalation of concurrent or sequential systemic treatment. The choice of the irradiated dose, the fractional dose, the fractionation scheme, and the refining of the dose-volume constraints depending on the radiosensitivity of each tissue type estimated on a case-by-case basis by miRNAs profile are possible concepts for the future radiotherapy and radiobiology of head and neck cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck)
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