Palliative-Setting Radiotherapy in Contemporary Cancer Care

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Palliative and Supportive Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2025 | Viewed by 511

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G5, Canada
2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2, Canada
Interests: palliative radiotherapy; brachytherapy; gynecological cancer; breast cancer; outcomes research; quality improvement; cancer health systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is integral to the care of Oncology patients, traditionally addressing burdensome symptoms or evolving functional compromise, including in emergent care. Often framed for settings where disease is too extensive to cure, RT has also found application among the growing population of patients living with chronic advanced cancer.

For this Special Issue, we invite contributions addressing RT along the spectrum of palliative settings, as part of the following:

  • A symptom support strategy when no further cancer-directed therapy is planned;
  • Prehabilitation/rehabilitation programming in metastatic or recurrent cancer;
  • A management approach that aspires to achieve durable disease control even when cancer is no longer confined.

Please share insights and outcomes relating to:

  • Integration of RT as part of modern multimodality approaches to symptom control;
  • Best practices to facilitate high-quality RT or mitigate side effects in palliative settings;
  • Personalization and shared decision-making for palliative RT;
  • Palliative RT considerations for special populations;
  • Sequencing (or deferral) of RT with novel systemic agents in biomarker-driven care;
  • Multiple and/or repeat courses of RT in complex palliative settings;
  • Harnessing new technologies for better palliative-setting RT, including artificial intelligence;
  • Technical choices in delivery of palliative-setting RT, including brachytherapy and SBRT;
  • Services designed to resource contexts and needs, including team-based models of RT care;
  • Educational initiatives in palliative-setting RT, communities of practice and learning.

Original research articles and reviews are especially sought, but all submissions will be considered.

Looking forward to your contributions.

Dr. Fleur Huang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • palliative radiotherapy
  • symptom control
  • oligorecurrence or oligoprogression
  • re-irradiation
  • advanced cancer
  • metastases
  • quality of life
  • patient-reported outcomes

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 1140 KiB  
Article
Deterioration of Performance Status during Palliative Radiotherapy Suggests a Significant Short Survival Duration: Indicating the Necessities for Considering Radiotherapy Discontinuation
by Hitoshi Maemoto, Kazuaki Kushi, Isoko Owan, Takuro Ariga, Joichi Heianna and Akihiro Nishie
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(4), 1752-1761; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31040133 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 412
Abstract
Discontinuation of palliative radiotherapy due to a patient’s declining general condition poses a clinical dilemma for palliative care physicians. This study aimed to investigate the survival duration of patients whose performance status (PS) deteriorated during palliative radiotherapy and inform decisions regarding early treatment [...] Read more.
Discontinuation of palliative radiotherapy due to a patient’s declining general condition poses a clinical dilemma for palliative care physicians. This study aimed to investigate the survival duration of patients whose performance status (PS) deteriorated during palliative radiotherapy and inform decisions regarding early treatment discontinuation. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients referred from our institute’s palliative care department who underwent ≥10 fractions of palliative radiotherapy between March 2017 and December 2021. PS was assessed using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scale. Survival duration was calculated from the final day of palliative radiotherapy to death using the Kaplan–Meier method. A total of 35 patients underwent palliative radiotherapy. Seven (20%) experienced deterioration in ECOG PS during treatment. Their median survival duration was significantly shorter at 22 days (95% confidence interval: 1–94 days) compared to 125 days (95% confidence interval: 82–150 days) for the 28 patients whose PS remained stable (p = 0.0007). Deterioration in ECOG PS during palliative radiotherapy signifies a markedly shorter survival duration. Careful assessment of a patient’s condition throughout treatment is crucial, and early discontinuation should be considered if their general health worsens rather than strictly adhering to the initial schedule. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Palliative-Setting Radiotherapy in Contemporary Cancer Care)
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