Special Issue "Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Piera Di Martino

University of Camerino – School of Pharmacy – Via S. Agostino 1 – 62032 Camerino (Italy)
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Phone: +393207985643
Interests: pharmacy; active pharmaceutical ingredients; functional ingredients; cosmetic science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, companies and consumers have shown increasing interest in cosmetics and food supplements containing functional ingredients, because they are perceived to promote global well-being, minimize the drawbacks of active pharmaceutical ingredients, and encourage the rediscovery of natural ingredients from traditional medicines. This trend is favoring the use of green ingredients in cosmetics and food supplements, and is receiving considerable attention in the media and on websites that highlight the beneficial properties of products containing green ingredients compared to those containing non-green ones. However, while on the one hand important environmental agencies worldwide are now promoting the sustainable development of new green products, on the other hand there is general confusion about the term "green" and how "green" products impact health, with some firms using the term very loosely simply in order to appeal to consumers.

This Special Issue focuses on the regulatory issues related to green products, evaluates the global market and trends of green products in cosmetics and food supplements, highlights the main advantages or disadvantages in selecting and developing green products compared to non-green ones, and provides examples of green products, their properties, and characteristics, as well as green processes.

Prof. Dr. Piera Di Martino
Guest Editor

 

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green ingredients
  • cosmetic
  • food supplement
  • sustainability
  • regulatory issues
  • market trends
  • advantages of green ingredients
  • disadvantages of green ingredients
  • green processes

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Formulating O/W Emulsions with Plant-Based Actives: A Stability Challenge for an Effective Product
Received: 6 September 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 2 October 2018 / Published: 9 October 2018
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Abstract
Quality, safety, and efficacy concerns added to instability, poor absorption, and the dispersion of actives are common problems while formulating plant-based cosmetics. Furthermore, a correct balance between the stability of the emulsion, the sensory profile, and the high efficacy has to be considered
[...] Read more.
Quality, safety, and efficacy concerns added to instability, poor absorption, and the dispersion of actives are common problems while formulating plant-based cosmetics. Furthermore, a correct balance between the stability of the emulsion, the sensory profile, and the high efficacy has to be considered to formulate an effective product. In this paper, we demonstrate that rheology is a methodological tool that can be used while designing a new product. In particular, we developed an O/W emulsion which is easy to spread on irritated skin, and that can soothe the redness and discomfort caused by the exposure to both physical and chemical irritating agents. The green active mixture consists of three natural raw materials: Bosexil®, Zanthalene®, and Xilogel®. Each ingredient has a well-demonstrated efficacy in terms of soothing, anti-itching, and moisturizing properties respectively. Starting from the selection of a new green emulsifying system, through the analysis of the rheological properties, we obtained a stable and easy-to-apply o/w emulsion. The efficacy of the optimized product was assessed in vitro on intact and injured skin using the SkinEthic™ Reconstituted Human Epidermis (RHE) as a biological model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
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Open AccessArticle Cosmetic Formulation Based on an Açai Extract
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 26 July 2018 / Published: 1 August 2018
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Abstract
(1) Background: Açai berry extract is known for its high content in polyphenols and thus is a promising ingredient for cosmetic antiaging formulations; (2) Methods: In this study, the açai extract was firstly evaluated for its total phenol content (Folin Ciocalteau essay) and
[...] Read more.
(1) Background: Açai berry extract is known for its high content in polyphenols and thus is a promising ingredient for cosmetic antiaging formulations; (2) Methods: In this study, the açai extract was firstly evaluated for its total phenol content (Folin Ciocalteau essay) and antioxidant activity (radical scavenging activity—DPPH; radical cation scavenging capacity—ABTS; ferric reducing antioxidant capacity—FRAP). Next, the açai extract was included in an O/W formulation and again was evaluated for its polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity. The formulation was tested for general characteristics, physicochemical properties and microbial stability. The proliferative effect on human immortalized fibroblasts was evaluated by the MTT essay, while TAC assay served to confirm that fibroblasts are protected from UV irradiation. The irritant potential was verified on 20 volunteers. The study concluded with the assessment of the sensorial characteristics of the cosmetic formulation; (3) Results: The pure açai extract exhibited high polyphenol content and antioxidant activity, and these characteristics were preserved in the O/W formulation as well. The O/W cosmetic formulation proved to be stable under accelerated and normal conditions, and the preservatives were successful in challenging the resistance against microbial contamination. The mean irritant potential was zero in all volunteers, and the cosmetic formulation showed a good sensorial profile; (4) Conclusions: Açai extract is an interesting ingredient for cosmetic antiaging formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Perspective: Stabilizing the Microbiome Skin-Gut-Brain Axis with Natural Plant Botanical Ingredients in Cosmetics
Received: 9 May 2018 / Revised: 1 June 2018 / Accepted: 9 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
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Abstract
The microbiome of the gut and skin have recently been shown to have a strong connection through the host immune system. Various skin and gut inflammatory conditions are interrelated and connected through intricate immune pathways that affect the host barrier functions both in
[...] Read more.
The microbiome of the gut and skin have recently been shown to have a strong connection through the host immune system. Various skin and gut inflammatory conditions are interrelated and connected through intricate immune pathways that affect the host barrier functions both in the skin and the gut. Microbiome ‘dysbiosis’ of the skin and gut leads to various alterations in host immune pathways that can alter the barrier and lead to disease. In this perspective article, we discuss the role of plant botanicals in cosmetics and their effect on the skin-gut-brain axis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Alkenones as a Promising Green Alternative for Waxes in Cosmetics and Personal Care Products
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 2 June 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1982 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The move toward green, sustainable, natural products has been growing in the cosmetic and personal care industry. Ingredients derived from marine organisms and algae are present in many cosmetic products. In this study, a new green ingredient, a wax (i.e., long-chain alkenones) derived
[...] Read more.
The move toward green, sustainable, natural products has been growing in the cosmetic and personal care industry. Ingredients derived from marine organisms and algae are present in many cosmetic products. In this study, a new green ingredient, a wax (i.e., long-chain alkenones) derived from Isochyrsis sp., was evaluated as an alternative for cosmetic waxes. First, the melting point was determined (71.1–77.4 °C), then the alkenones’ thickening capability in five emollients was evaluated and compared to microcrystalline wax and ozokerite. Alkenones were compatible with three emollients and thickened the emollients similarly to the other waxes. Then, lipsticks and lip balms were formulated with and without alkenones. All products remained stable at room temperature for 10 weeks. Lipstick formulated with alkenones was the most resistant to high temperature. Finally, alkenones were compared to three cosmetic thickening waxes in creams. Viscosity, rheology, and stability of the creams were evaluated. All creams had a gel-like behavior. Both viscosity and storage modulus increased in the same order: cream with alkenones < cetyl alcohol < stearic acid < glyceryl monostearate. Overall, alkenones’ performance was comparable to the other three waxes. Alkenones can thus offer a potential green choice as a new cosmetic structuring agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Endocrine Disruption by Mixtures in Topical Consumer Products
Received: 20 September 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 12 October 2018 / Published: 16 October 2018
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Abstract
Endocrine disruption has been gathering increasing attention in the past 25 years as a possible new threat for health and safety. Exposure to endocrine disruptor has been progressively linked with a growing number of increasing disease in the human population. The mechanics through
[...] Read more.
Endocrine disruption has been gathering increasing attention in the past 25 years as a possible new threat for health and safety. Exposure to endocrine disruptor has been progressively linked with a growing number of increasing disease in the human population. The mechanics through which endocrine disruptors act are not yet completely clear, however a number of pathways have been identified. A key concern is the cumulative and synergic effects that endocrine disruptors could have when mixed in consumer products. We reviewed the available literature to identify known or potential endocrine disruptors, as well as endocrine active substances that could contribute to cumulative effects, in topical consumer products. The number of endocrine actives used daily in consumer products is staggering and even though most if not all are used in concentrations that are considered to be safe, we believe that the possibility of combined effects in mixtures and non-monotonic dose/response is enough to require further precautions. A combined in vitro approach based on existing, validated OECD test methods is suggested to screen consumer products and mixtures for potential interaction with estrogen and androgen hormone receptors, in order to identify products that could have cumulative effects or support their safety concerning direct endocrine disruption capabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
Open AccessReview Agro-Industrial By-Products and Their Bioactive Compounds—An Ally against Oxidative Stress and Skin Aging
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 29 September 2018 / Published: 1 October 2018
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Abstract
The increased consumer awareness towards hazards related with sun exposure has given a boost in the cosmetics industry and particularly the sun care market. Human skin is continually being threatened by the UV irradiation present in sunlight and acute UV exposure leads to
[...] Read more.
The increased consumer awareness towards hazards related with sun exposure has given a boost in the cosmetics industry and particularly the sun care market. Human skin is continually being threatened by the UV irradiation present in sunlight and acute UV exposure leads to skin photoaging. Cosmetic and/or dermatological applications include several bioactive compounds that contribute to the regulation of epidermal homeostasis by providing protection against solar radiation and improving the antioxidant activity of epidermis. Plant extracts are sources of active ingredients with intense therapeutic properties, and the topical application or oral intake of these compounds could ameliorate skin condition. Nowadays, there is a growing demand for the application of the bioactive agents contained in agro-industrial byproducts in sun care products, since many of them have shown promising properties as skin photoprotectants. However, well-conducted clinical studies are required to prove their safety and efficacy before they could be regularly used. Environmentally friendly extraction and sustainable techniques are therefore under examination for recovering such compounds from agro-industrial byproducts and converting them into innovative high-value natural ingredients used in cosmetic formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
Open AccessReview Labeling of Cosmetic Products
Received: 2 March 2018 / Revised: 8 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
The labeling of cosmetic products provides a set of obligations, as reported in the Regulation 1223/2009, which came into force in Europe in July 2013. The indications reported on the label are intended to enable the clear identification of the functionality and proper
[...] Read more.
The labeling of cosmetic products provides a set of obligations, as reported in the Regulation 1223/2009, which came into force in Europe in July 2013. The indications reported on the label are intended to enable the clear identification of the functionality and proper use of cosmetics, ensure the protection of the consumer from the commercial aspects and, above all, from the safety point of view. Moreover, it should allow quick tracing of the product details and all info of toxicological relevance. However, the misuse of this tool often leads, on one side, to confusion among cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and biocides. On the other side, it gives rise to fanciful interpretations by a huge number of web users, who pretend to be able to judge the quality of a cosmetic product just by reading the ingredients list. This article points out the concrete purpose of cosmetic labels, in order to shed light on the use of certain categories of ‘controversial’ ingredients and on the real quality concepts of cosmetic products. Indeed, when properly interpreted, cosmetic labels represent a good tool for the professional investigation of adverse reactions to cosmetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Ingredients in Cosmetics and food)
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