Rheology of Complex Fluids and Interfaces

A special issue of Colloids and Interfaces (ISSN 2504-5377).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 7622

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National School of Chemical Industries (ENSIC), Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France
Interests: rheology; fluid mechanics of complex fluids; CFD; suspension; emulsions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France
Interests: polymeric materials; material characterization; glass transition; flow; powders; rheology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emulsions and foams, stabilized by particles, proteins, polymers or surfactants, can be found in numerous industrial applications—particularly in the food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. In these complex formulated products, the presence of fluid–fluid interfaces induces complex rheological behavior and hydrodynamics. In order to control the stability of these systems and to provide them with the desired end-use properties, it is fundamental to understand the relationship between their interfacial microstructure and their bulk rheological properties. In this context, this Special Issue aims at covering the recent advances in structural rheology, emphasizing the link between interfacial rheology, volumic rheology and macroscopic end-use properties.

We welcome the submission of papers on topics including but not limited to the following:

  • Surfactant, polymer, protein, particle-laden interfaces;
  • Interfacial rheometry and tensiometry;
  • Hydrodynamics and colloidal transport at interfaces;
  • Emulsification and foaming, emulsion and foam stability;
  • Structural modelling of interfacial vs volumic rheology;
  • Dynamics and agglomeration under flow;
  • Multiphase evolving or reacting systems, especially at the interfaces.

Dr. Cecile Lemaitre
Prof. Dr. Philippe Marchal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Colloids and Interfaces is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emulsion
  • foam
  • interface
  • rheology
  • transport at interfaces

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 921 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Copolymer-Based Nanoparticle Composition (MEO2MA-OEGMA) on the Release Profile of Doxorubicin In Vitro
by Zied Ferjaoui, Eric Gaffet and Halima Alem
Colloids Interfaces 2024, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids8010001 - 19 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1244
Abstract
The release of drugs from core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) is a crucial factor in ensuring high reproducibility, stability, and quality control. It serves as the scientific basis for the development of nanocarriers. Several factors, such as composition, composition ratio, ingredient interactions, and preparation methods, [...] Read more.
The release of drugs from core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) is a crucial factor in ensuring high reproducibility, stability, and quality control. It serves as the scientific basis for the development of nanocarriers. Several factors, such as composition, composition ratio, ingredient interactions, and preparation methods, influence the drug release from these carrier systems. The objective of our study was to investigate and discuss the relationship between modifications of core/shell NPs as multifunctional drug delivery systems and the properties and kinetics of drug release using an in vitro drug release model. In this paper, we prepared four core/shell NPs consisting of a superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (Fe3−δO4) core encapsulated by a biocompatible thermo-responsive copolymer, poly(2-(2-methoxy) ethyl methacrylate-oligo (ethylene glycol) methacrylate) or P(MEO2MAx-OEGMA100−x) (where x and 100 − x represented the molar fractions of MEO2MA and OEGMA, respectively), and loaded with doxorubicin (DOX). Colloidal behavior measurements in water and PBS as a function of temperature showed an optimization of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) depending on the molar fractions of MEO2MA and OEGMA used to form each NPs. In vitro studies of doxorubicin release as a function of temperature demonstrated a high control of release based on the LCST. A temperature of approximately 45 °C for 60 h was sufficient to release 100% of the DOX loaded in the NPs for each sample. In conclusion, external stimuli can be used to modulate the drug release behavior. Core/shell NPs hold great promise as a technique for multifunctional drug delivery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology of Complex Fluids and Interfaces)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 51857 KiB  
Article
Rheology of Suspensions of Solid Particles in Liquids Thickened by Starch Nanoparticles
by Ghazaleh Ghanaatpishehsanaei and Rajinder Pal
Colloids Interfaces 2023, 7(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids7030052 - 24 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1830
Abstract
The rheology of suspensions of solid particles in aqueous matrix liquids thickened by starch nanoparticles (SNP) was investigated. The SNP concentration varied from 9.89 to 34.60 wt% based on the aqueous matrix phase. The solids concentration of suspensions varied from 0 to 47 [...] Read more.
The rheology of suspensions of solid particles in aqueous matrix liquids thickened by starch nanoparticles (SNP) was investigated. The SNP concentration varied from 9.89 to 34.60 wt% based on the aqueous matrix phase. The solids concentration of suspensions varied from 0 to 47 wt% (0 to 56 vol%). The suspensions at any given SNP concentration were generally Newtonian at low solids concentrations. At high solids concentrations, the suspensions were non-Newtonian shear-thinning. With the increase in the SNP concentration, the suspensions become non-Newtonian at a lower solids concentration. The rheological behavior of non-Newtonian suspensions could be described adequately with a power-law model. The consistency index of the suspension increased with the increase in solids concentration of the suspension at any given SNP concentration. The flow behavior index of suspensions was well below unity at high solids concentrations, indicating non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior. The value of the flow behavior index decreased with the increase in solids concentration indicating an enhancement of shear-thinning in suspensions. The experimental viscosity and consistency data for Newtonian and non-Newtonian suspensions showed good agreement with the predictions of the Pal viscosity model for suspensions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology of Complex Fluids and Interfaces)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 8653 KiB  
Article
Rheology of Pickering Emulsions Stabilized and Thickened by Cellulose Nanocrystals over Broad Ranges of Oil and Nanocrystal Concentrations
by Saumay Kinra and Rajinder Pal
Colloids Interfaces 2023, 7(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids7020036 - 24 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2184
Abstract
The rheology of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, stabilized and thickened by cellulose nanocrystals, also referred to as nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), was investigated over broad ranges of NCC and oil concentrations. The NCC concentration was varied from 1.03 to 7.41 wt% based on the aqueous [...] Read more.
The rheology of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, stabilized and thickened by cellulose nanocrystals, also referred to as nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), was investigated over broad ranges of NCC and oil concentrations. The NCC concentration was varied from 1.03 to 7.41 wt% based on the aqueous phase. The oil concentration of the emulsion was varied from approximately 10 to 70 wt%. The emulsions produced were highly stable with respect to creaming and coalescence. The emulsions were non-Newtonian in that they exhibited strong shear-thinning behavior. The rheological data were described adequately by a power-law model. The consistency index (K) and the flow behavior index (n) of the emulsions were strongly dependent on the NCC and oil concentrations. At a fixed oil concentration, the consistency index increased whereas the flow behavior index decreased with the increase in NCC concentration. A similar behavior was observed when the NCC concentration was fixed and the oil concentration was increased; that is, the consistency index increased whereas the flow behavior index decreased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology of Complex Fluids and Interfaces)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 1543 KiB  
Article
Transient Analysis of the Electro-Osmotic Flow of Multilayer Immiscible Maxwell Fluids in an Annular Microchannel
by Juan P. Escandón, David A. Torres, Clara G. Hernández, Juan R. Gómez and René O. Vargas
Colloids Interfaces 2022, 6(4), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/colloids6040060 - 24 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1654
Abstract
This work investigates the transient multilayer electro-osmotic flow of viscoelastic fluids through an annular microchannel. The dimensionless mathematical model of multilayer flow is integrated by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation, the rheological Maxwell model, initial conditions, and the electrostatic and [...] Read more.
This work investigates the transient multilayer electro-osmotic flow of viscoelastic fluids through an annular microchannel. The dimensionless mathematical model of multilayer flow is integrated by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation, the rheological Maxwell model, initial conditions, and the electrostatic and hydrodynamic boundary conditions at liquid-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces. Although the main force that drives the movement of fluids is due to electrokinetic effects, a pressure gradient can also be added to the flow. The semi-analytical solution for the electric potential distribution and velocity profiles considers analytical techniques as the Laplace transform method, with numerical procedures using the inverse matrix method for linear algebraic equations and the concentrated matrix exponential method for the inversion of the Laplace transform. The results presented for velocity profiles and velocity tracking at the transient regime reveal an interesting oscillatory behavior that depends on elastic fluid properties via relaxation times. The time required for the flow to reach steady-state is highly dependent on the viscosity ratios and the dimensionless relaxation times. In addition, the influence of other dimensionless parameters on the flow as the electrokinetic parameters, zeta potentials at the walls, permittivity ratios, ratio of pressure forces to electro-osmotic forces, number of fluid layers, and annular thickness are investigated. The findings of this study have significant implications for the precise control of parallel fluid transport in microfluidic devices for flow-focusing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rheology of Complex Fluids and Interfaces)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop