Special Issue "Innovative Organic Coatings"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Krzysztof Formela
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Polymer Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, G. Narutowicza Str. 11/12, Gdańsk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdańsk, Poland
Interests: plastics and rubber recycling; reactive processing; composites; polymer blends’ and composites’ compatibilization; bitumen modification
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mohammad Reza Saeb
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Resin and Additives, Institute for Color Science and Technology, P.O. Box: 16765-654, Tehran, Iran
Interests: polymer blends; polymer composites; polymer nanocomposites; biopolymers; thermal analysis of polymer systems; thermoset composites; cure index; cure kinetics; coatings; bio-based resins
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At present, organic coatings are key elements of advanced engineering systems, and life without coatings would be impossible to imagine. Organic coatings can be used as decorative, anticorrosion, antiflame, antifouling, and several other sorts to protect a substrate/base/platform/surface from attacking moieties. Due to the complexity of materials and systems used today, organic coatings are designed and expected to play a multiple role. For instance, using a protective coating against corrosion media can be additionally expected for playing the role of sensors when smoke exists on the space above a standard level defined for the (open of closed) atmosphere. Meanwhile, protection of the substrate from UV irradiation would be another necessity to receive a response from coatings. On the other hand, detrimental events that trigger one function of coatings may additionally lead to the destruction of other functionalities. Moreover, one can use smart coatings that play different roles each time and depending on circumstances (e.g., thermosensitive, pH-sensitive, self-healing, conductive). Thus, design and development of multifunctional coatings is the state of the art and necessitates both knowledge and experience. Some other thin films or cast films can also play the role of coating against a bioorganic media. From this perspective, protection of fruits by ultrathin coatings can also be positioned in the field of coatings. In the light of above, innovations in design and manufacture of coatings for advanced targeted protection(s) are needed, and the aim of this Special Issue is to collect innovative works devoted to organic coatings.

The keywords below give some examples of the themes relevant to this Special Issue:

  • Thermoplastic coatings;
  • Thermoset coatings;
  • Structure–property relationship in organic coatings;
  • Anticorrosion coatings;
  • Antiflame coatings;
  • Antifouling coatings;
  • Smart coatings;
  • Multifunctional coatings;
  • Mechanical properties of coatings;
  • Surface treatment of coatings;
  • Decorative coatings;
  • Multilayer coatings;
  • 3D printing of coatings;
  • Coatings for space applications;
  • Modern technologies for developing coatings;
  • Simulation of properties and performance of coatings;
  • Transport phenomena in and across coatings;
  • Biodegradable coatings;
  • Green coatings.

Dr. Krzysztof Formela
Dr. Mohammad Reza Saeb
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coating
  • Thin films
  • Corrosion
  • Thermoset
  • Thermoplastic

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Thermal-Resistant Polyurethane/Nanoclay Powder Coatings: Degradation Kinetics Study
Coatings 2020, 10(9), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090871 - 09 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1025
Abstract
In the present study, thermal degradation kinetics of polyurethane (PU) powder coatings reinforced with organo-modified montmorillonite (OMMT) was investigated. PU nanocomposites were prepared in different concentrations of 1, 3, and 5 wt.% of OMMT via the extrusion method. The microstructure of the nanocomposites [...] Read more.
In the present study, thermal degradation kinetics of polyurethane (PU) powder coatings reinforced with organo-modified montmorillonite (OMMT) was investigated. PU nanocomposites were prepared in different concentrations of 1, 3, and 5 wt.% of OMMT via the extrusion method. The microstructure of the nanocomposites was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) illustrating uniform dispersion of OMMT nano-clay platelets in the PU matrix except for the sample containing 5 wt.% nano-palates. Thermal degradation kinetics of the PU nanocomposite was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at different heating rates of 5, 10, and 20 °C/min. The results showed that the initial decomposition temperatures were shifted toward higher values (more than 40 °C for T5% and up to 20 °C for T10%) by introducing the nano-clay to the PU matrix. Friedman, Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose (KAS), Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO), and modified Coats-Redfern iso-conversional methods were applied to model the decomposition reaction and the activation energy of the nanocomposite powder coatings. Overall, the presence of nano-clay increased the activation energy of the PU degradation up to 45 kJ/mol, when compared to the blank PU, which suggests very high thermal stability of nanocomposites. The Sestak-Berggren approach proposed a good approximation for the reaction model, especially at low temperatures. Thus, PU decomposition was detected as an autocatalytic reaction, which was suppressed by the barrier effect of OMMT nano-palates intercalated with polymer chains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Organic Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Polyurethane/Silane-Functionalized ZrO2 Nanocomposite Powder Coatings: Thermal Degradation Kinetics
Coatings 2020, 10(4), 413; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10040413 - 21 Apr 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
A polyurethane (PU)-based powder coating reinforced with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS)-functionalized ZrO2 nanoparticles (V-ZrO2) for thermal stability was developed. Chemical structure, microstructure and thermal degradation kinetics of the prepared coatings were investigated. The peak of aliphatic C–H vibrating bond in the Fourier [...] Read more.
A polyurethane (PU)-based powder coating reinforced with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS)-functionalized ZrO2 nanoparticles (V-ZrO2) for thermal stability was developed. Chemical structure, microstructure and thermal degradation kinetics of the prepared coatings were investigated. The peak of aliphatic C–H vibrating bond in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of V-ZrO2 was a signature of VTMS attachment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images reveled that, by increase of V-ZrO2 content from 0.1 to 0.3 wt.% and then 0.5 wt.%, some agglomerations of nanoparticles are formed in the PU matrix. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the PU/V-ZrO2 powder coatings was performed at different heating rates nonisothermally to capture alteration of activation energy (Ea) of degradation of PU/V-ZrO2 powder coatings as a function of partial mass loss by using Friedman, Kissinger–Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Ozawa–Wall–Flynn (FWO) and modified Coats–Redfern isoconversional approaches. It was observed that by addition of 1 wt.% V-ZrO2 to PU resin the early state degradation temperature at 5% weight loss increased about 65 °C, suggesting a physical barrier effect limiting the volatility of free radicals and decomposition products. Incorporation of 5 wt.% ZrO2 led to about 16% and 10% increase in Ea and LnA of blank PU, respectively, which was indicative of higher thermal resistance of nanocomposite powder coatings against thermal degradation. There was also obvious agreement between model outputs and experimental data. The results reveal that nanocomposite coating shows superior thermal properties compared to neat PU powder coatings, and the presence of nano ZrO2 in sufficient amount causes retardation of the thermal decomposition process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Organic Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Degree of Hydrophilicity of Pyridinium Bromide Derivatives on HCl Pickling of X-60 Mild Steel: Experimental and Theoretical Evaluations
Coatings 2020, 10(2), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10020185 - 19 Feb 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 858
Abstract
Dodecyl pyridinium bromide (DDPB), tetradecyl pyridinium bromide (TDPB) and dodecyl 1,1′-bispyridinium dibromide (DDBPB) were successfully synthesized, characterized and evaluated for HCl pickling of X-60 low carbon steel. Order of corrosion inhibitions efficiencies, as revealed by both electrochemical and gravimetric studies, is TDPB > [...] Read more.
Dodecyl pyridinium bromide (DDPB), tetradecyl pyridinium bromide (TDPB) and dodecyl 1,1′-bispyridinium dibromide (DDBPB) were successfully synthesized, characterized and evaluated for HCl pickling of X-60 low carbon steel. Order of corrosion inhibitions efficiencies, as revealed by both electrochemical and gravimetric studies, is TDPB > DDPB > DDBPB. The degree of hydrophilicity of inhibitors as predicted by a partition coefficient (Log P) and supported by a contact angle measurement was found to be responsible for their order of corrosion inhibition efficiencies. Adsorption of DDPB, TDPB, and DDBPB through the pyridinium nitrogen on mild steel surface was confirmed by ATR-FTIR and SEM-EDX analyses. The pyridinium nitrogen was found not to be the only factor responsible for their efficiency, but hydrophobes and the orientation of the hydrophilic ring were responsible, which incline to the deviation of experimental results and the order of Monte Carlo simulation adsorption energies. DDPB, TDPB, and DDBPB obey the Langmuir isotherm model despite major contributions of the film formed on the surface of X-60 mild steel on their overall inhibition corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Organic Coatings)
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