Special Issue "Coatings for Dies and Molds"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francisco J. G. Silva Website E-Mail
ISEP–School of Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, 4249-015 Porto, Portugal
Interests: manufacturing processes; material properties; microhardness; microstructures; hard coatings; wear; friction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to provide a forum for the latest developments in "Coatings for Dies and Molds", taking into account the lifespan increase usually desired by sheet metal stamping or plastic injection companies. The objective of the Special Issue is to disseminate fundamental theoretical knowledge about how coatings can improve the performance of important tools, usually subjected to severe conditions in terms of temperature, friction and loads imposed, as well as of empirical research to address significant theoretical and practical issues in the following areas:

  • Suitability of the coatings for stamping dies
  • Suitability of the coatings for plastic injection
  • Wear mechanisms involved in stamping dies
  • Wear mechanisms involved in the injection of glass fiber reinforced plastics
  • Multilayered thin films for molds
  • Coatings to improve release in injection molding
  • Corrosion protective coatings for injection molding
  • Improvement of the abrasion resistance in the injection of glass fibers reinforced plastics
  • Effect of the temperature on the coatings applied in plastic injection moulding
  • Coatings applied in plastic injection molding: Case studies
  • Study of the lifespan improvement regarding the application of coatings
  • Multilayered coatings for stamping tools
  • Coatings to improve the friction behavior in stamping dies
  • Fatigue effect on coatings applied in stamping tools
  • Coatings wear characterization
  • Influence of the film microstructure on the coating behavior
  • Simulation of the deposition process and coatings properties prediction
  • Simulation of the coatings behavior

Prof. Dr. Francisco J. G. Silva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Non-Stick Coatings in Aluminium Molds for the Production of Polyurethane Foam
Coatings 2018, 8(9), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8090301 - 27 Aug 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The manufacturing of polyurethane foam is a process of great industrial importance in the automotive and furniture sector. The operation of demolding is the most delicate, since the foam sticks firmly to the walls of the mold onto which it has spread. In [...] Read more.
The manufacturing of polyurethane foam is a process of great industrial importance in the automotive and furniture sector. The operation of demolding is the most delicate, since the foam sticks firmly to the walls of the mold onto which it has spread. In order to avoid the use of demolding agents, the proposal is to coat the inside of the molds with non-stick coatings. In this work, three types of different coatings were studied: fluoropolymers, ceramics, and elastomers. After carrying out different tests in the laboratory, two fluoropolymer coatings (PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) and PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)) were selected for a test at the industrial level and, after 1500 cycles of demolding, it was experimentally proven that the PFA coating is the most adequate for the use studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Dies and Molds)
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Open AccessArticle
Bonding Characteristics and Chemical Inertness of Zr–Si–N Coatings with a High Si Content in Glass Molding
Coatings 2018, 8(5), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8050181 - 11 May 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
High-Si-content transition metal nitride coatings, which exhibited an X-ray amorphous phase, were proposed as protective coatings on glass molding dies. In a previous study, the Zr–Si–N coatings with Si contents of 24–30 at.% exhibited the hardness of Si3N4, which [...] Read more.
High-Si-content transition metal nitride coatings, which exhibited an X-ray amorphous phase, were proposed as protective coatings on glass molding dies. In a previous study, the Zr–Si–N coatings with Si contents of 24–30 at.% exhibited the hardness of Si3N4, which was higher than those of the middle-Si-content (19 at.%) coatings. In this study, the bonding characteristics of the constituent elements of Zr–Si–N coatings were evaluated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicated that the Zr 3d5/2 levels were 179.14–180.22 and 180.75–181.61 eV for the Zr–N bonds in ZrN and Zr3N4 compounds, respectively. Moreover, the percentage of Zr–N bond in the Zr3N4 compound increased with increasing Si content in the Zr–Si–N coatings. The Zr–N bond of Zr3N4 dominated when the Si content was >24 at.%. Therefore, high Si content can stabilize the Zr–N compound in the M3N4 bonding structure. Furthermore, the thermal stability and chemical inertness of Zr–Si–N coatings were evaluated by conducting thermal cycle annealing at 270 °C and 600 °C in a 15-ppm O2–N2 atmosphere. The results indicated that a Zr22Si29N49/Ti/WC assembly was suitable as a protective coating against SiO2–B2O3–BaO-based glass for 450 thermal cycles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Dies and Molds)
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Open AccessArticle
Study on Modified Water Glass Used in High Temperature Protective Glass Coating for Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy
Coatings 2018, 8(5), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8050158 - 26 Apr 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Sodium silicate water glass was modified with sodium polyacrylate as the binder, the composite slurry used for high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating was prepared by mixing glass powder with good lubrication properties in the binder. The properties of the modified binder and high-temperature oxidation resistance [...] Read more.
Sodium silicate water glass was modified with sodium polyacrylate as the binder, the composite slurry used for high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating was prepared by mixing glass powder with good lubrication properties in the binder. The properties of the modified binder and high-temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy coated with composite glass coating were studied by XRD, SEM, EDS, TG-DSC and so on. Results showed that sodium polyacrylate modified water glass could obviously improve the suspension stability of the binder, the pyrolytic carbon in the binder at high temperature could increase the surface tension in the molten glass system, and the composite glass coating could be smooth and dense after heating. Pyrolytic carbon diffused and combined with oxygen in the coating under the heating process to protect the titanium alloy from oxidation. The thickness of the oxide layer was reduced 51% after applying the high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating. The coating also showed a nearly 30% reduction in friction coefficient due to the boundary lubricant regime. During cooling, the coating could be peeled off easily because of the mismatched CTE between the coating and substrate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Dies and Molds)
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