Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion, Wear and Erosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 8078

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA 91768, USA
Interests: nanotechnology; materials processing; manufacturing; mechanical design
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Corrosion-resistant coatings have important characteristics, such as high chemical inertness, large heat resistance, good mechanical strength, and enhanced toughness. Recently, considerable progress has been made in the development of various coatings for the protection of materials’ exposure to aggressive corrosive media, such as seawater, biofluids, and high-temperature gases. Advanced composite material coatings containing nanoparticles and nanotubes, new conversion coatings, and novel plasma coatings are some examples. Coating technology has also advanced to a new level. This can be seen from the recent developments in using novel electrochemical and chemical conversion approaches, sol–gel methods, plasma-enhanced growth, laser peening, etc. Exploring new coating materials, including alloys, polymers, ceramics, composites, and nanostructured materials, leads to the discovery of multifunctional coatings for applications in civil structures, machinery, and bio-implants.

This scope of this Special Issue will include, but is not limited to, the following fundamental and applied research topics:

  • Corrosion-resistant coatings for implants;
  • Seawater-corrosion-resistant coatings for petroleum engineering applications;
  • Research developments in new organic, inorganic, and composite coatings;
  • Coating technology and processes: sol–gel processes, hydrothermal processes, laser processes, plasma processes, thermal spray processes, electroplating, chemical deposition, physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor deposition, chromating, fluorozirconating, fluorotitanating, phosphating, bluing, black oxide coating formation, anodizing, etc.;
  • High-performance Ni–P coatings, high-temperature-resistant coatings, protective coatings in ionic fluids;
  • Corrosion mechanisms in actual or simulated biofluids;
  • Test methods for determining the corrosion of coatings in various electrolytes;
  • The modeling and simulation of coating processing and corrosion;
  • Nanostructured composite coatings and corrosion characterization.

Prof. Dr. Yong X. Gan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corrosion-resistant coatings
  • polymers, ceramics, alloys, and composite coatings
  • nanostructured coating modeling and simulation
  • coating processes
  • corrosion mechanisms of coatings

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 192 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue: Advances in Corrosion Resistant Coatings Volume II
by Yong X. Gan
Coatings 2022, 12(6), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12060847 - 17 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1361
Abstract
Among the various corrosion prevention methods as described in [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

15 pages, 3930 KiB  
Article
Effect of Acrylic Resin on the Protection Performance of Epoxy Coating for Magnesium Alloy
by Xinyu Liu, Yingjun Zhang, Yong Jiang, Mengyang Li, Jianjun Bai and Xiaorong Zhou
Coatings 2024, 14(5), 577; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14050577 - 6 May 2024
Viewed by 592
Abstract
The low toughness of epoxy resin can influence its shielding performance against a corrosive medium and strength of adhesion to metal surfaces. Extensive efforts have been made to modify epoxy resin. In this research, acrylic resin was synthesized by the solution method, and [...] Read more.
The low toughness of epoxy resin can influence its shielding performance against a corrosive medium and strength of adhesion to metal surfaces. Extensive efforts have been made to modify epoxy resin. In this research, acrylic resin was synthesized by the solution method, and 1 wt.%, 2.5 wt.%, and 5 wt.% were added to epoxy resin (E44 brand) to prepare coatings on the surface of AZ31B magnesium alloy. The effects of acrylic resin on the mechanical and protective properties of epoxy coatings were investigated via experiments measuring impact resistance, flexibility, and adhesion as well as the electrochemical impedance technique. Compared with the pure epoxy coating, the adhesion between the coating and the substrate increases by 1.37 MPa after the addition of 2.5 wt.% acrylic resin. Meanwhile, the pencil hardness has a slight change from 5B to 6B, and the flexibility significantly improves. Therefore, the epoxy coating exhibits enhanced anticorrosive properties after the addition of 2.5 wt.% acrylic resin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition)
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16 pages, 4378 KiB  
Article
A Study of Accelerated Corrosion of Stainless Steels under Highly Oxidizing Conditions
by Alberto Ubaldini, Chiara Telloli, Antonietta Rizzo, Alessandro Gessi, Giuseppe Marghella, Stefania Bruni, Sara Calistri, Francesco Gennerini and Georgiana Pintilei
Coatings 2024, 14(4), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14040390 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 991
Abstract
The corrosion behavior of certain steels under extremely oxidative conditions, simulating the impact of water radiolysis on stainless steels, has been investigated. Radiolysis generates aggressive species, including radicals, solvated electrons, and hydrogen peroxide, potentially leading to corrosion over time in materials typically considered [...] Read more.
The corrosion behavior of certain steels under extremely oxidative conditions, simulating the impact of water radiolysis on stainless steels, has been investigated. Radiolysis generates aggressive species, including radicals, solvated electrons, and hydrogen peroxide, potentially leading to corrosion over time in materials typically considered resistant. To expedite the kinetics of this phenomenon, drastic conditions were employed, involving high concentrations of peroxide in a strongly acidic environment. Under these conditions, corrosion can manifest rapidly. The varied responses of different steels are contingent upon their inherent nature and chemical composition, notably the chromium and nickel content. Steels with higher chromium and nickel concentrations exhibit increased resistance to corrosion, even in such severe environments. Microscopic corrosion mechanisms involve pitting and intergranular corrosion. Pitting results in the formation of craters on surfaces, while intergranular corrosion leads to the detachment of grains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition)
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14 pages, 5528 KiB  
Article
Corrosion Behavior of the 2024 Aluminum Alloy in the Atmospheric Environment of the South China Sea Islands
by Jing Zhao, Tongjun Zhao, Yazhou Zhang, Zhongtian Zhang, Zehao Chen, Jinlong Wang and Minghui Chen
Coatings 2024, 14(3), 331; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14030331 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1017
Abstract
The 2024 aluminum alloy, a structural material commonly used in aviation aircraft bodies, is susceptible to serious corrosion in marine atmospheric environments. This paper comprehensively studies the corrosion behavior of the 2024 aluminum alloy in the South China Sea atmosphere. Weighing, morphology observation, [...] Read more.
The 2024 aluminum alloy, a structural material commonly used in aviation aircraft bodies, is susceptible to serious corrosion in marine atmospheric environments. This paper comprehensively studies the corrosion behavior of the 2024 aluminum alloy in the South China Sea atmosphere. Weighing, morphology observation, phase analysis, electrochemical testing, and other methods were used to study the corrosion law and corrosion mechanism of the 2024 aluminum alloy. The main conclusions are as follows: At the initial stage of exposure, pitting corrosion occurred on the surface of the 2024 aluminum alloy. After 3 months of exposure, the self-corrosion current density increased from 0.456 μA·cm−2 to 8.338 μA·cm−2. After 6 months of exposure, the corrosion developed into general corrosion. The main component of the corrosion product was Al2O3·3H2O. The product covered the surface to form a loose corrosion product layer, which had an inhibitory effect on corrosion. The self-corrosion current density was reduced to 2.359 μA·cm−2. After 12 months of exposure, the corrosion product layer fell off and became thinner, and the self-corrosion current density increased to 2.849 μA·cm−2. The corrosion kinetics conformed to the functional equation W = 0.00346t0.73891, indicating that the corrosion products have a certain protective effect on the matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition)
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21 pages, 9909 KiB  
Article
Mutual Impact of Four Organic Calcium Salts on the Formation and Properties of Micro-Arc Oxidation Coatings on AZ31B Magnesium Alloys
by Changtian Chen, Xiaoting Shi, Shufang Zhang, Youliang Shen, Ying Zhao, Rongfa Zhang and Rongfang Zhao
Coatings 2024, 14(1), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14010140 - 20 Jan 2024
Viewed by 888
Abstract
Calcium phosphate (Ca–P) coatings provide an effective approach in current research and the clinical application of Mg alloys by endowing them with improved corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and even bioactivity. Ca-containing coatings were prepared on AZ31B magnesium alloys using the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique [...] Read more.
Calcium phosphate (Ca–P) coatings provide an effective approach in current research and the clinical application of Mg alloys by endowing them with improved corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and even bioactivity. Ca-containing coatings were prepared on AZ31B magnesium alloys using the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique and a combination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid calcium disodium (EDTA–Ca), calcium glycerophosphate (GP–Ca), calcium gluconate (CaGlu2), and calcium lactate (CaLac2) as the Ca source in a near-neutral solution. The respective and mutual impacts of the four calcium salts on the formation and properties of the coatings were investigated. Experimental results indicated that GP–Ca was more decisive than EDTA–Ca, CaGlu2, and CaLac2 in the formation, morphology, and, therefore, the corrosion resistance of the coatings. GP–Ca alone could not effectively incorporate Ca2+ ions into the coatings but it could combine with EDTA–Ca, CaGlu2, and CaLac2 to bring a synergistic effect in improving the Ca content of the coatings. The bifunctional structure of CaGlu2 and CaLac2, containing hydroxyl groups and carboxylic groups with anchoring effects, enabled them to enhance the Ca content of the coatings. However, due to minor differences in functional group orientation, CaGlu2 was a little more efficient than CaLac2 in increasing Ca content, while CaLac2 was a little more efficient than CaGlu2 in improving the corrosion resistance of the coatings. Finally, the total concentration of the four calcium salts, [Ca2+]T, should be controlled at a proper level; otherwise, excessively high [Ca2+]T would produce localized microbumps originating from coating ablation, eventually deteriorating the corrosion resistance of the coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition)
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16 pages, 3987 KiB  
Article
Chitosan-Based Sustainable Coatings for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum in Seawater
by Ana Alejandra Aguilar-Ruiz, Germán Eduardo Dévora-Isiordia, Reyna Guadalupe Sánchez-Duarte, Yedidia Villegas-Peralta, Víctor Manuel Orozco-Carmona and Jesús Álvarez-Sánchez
Coatings 2023, 13(9), 1615; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13091615 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1267
Abstract
Metals are widely used in various industrial applications due to their advantageous properties, but they often exhibit signs of degradation over time because of prolonged exposure to environmental conditions. To prevent corrosion, coatings have gained popularity owing to their practicality in maintaining the [...] Read more.
Metals are widely used in various industrial applications due to their advantageous properties, but they often exhibit signs of degradation over time because of prolonged exposure to environmental conditions. To prevent corrosion, coatings have gained popularity owing to their practicality in maintaining the original shape and dimensions of the object being protected. Nevertheless, traditional coatings may pose significant toxicological and environmental concerns, leading researchers to explore eco-friendly alternatives such as chitosan-based coatings. Chitosan, a biopolymer derived from chitin, is abundant in nature and has been extensively studied for its physicochemical properties, including its potential in the development of new materials. Chitosan-based coatings have shown promise as effective corrosion inhibitors, and this study aims to develop a crosslinked chitosan-based coating from shrimp waste as an alternative to expensive, commercial coatings. Chitosan, and chemically modified polyethylene glycol, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and ammonium paratungstate chitosan coatings of high- and medium molecular weight prepared by the sol-gel technique, were used for the study of corrosion protection of aluminum in 3.5% synthetic seawater. The molecular interactions and structural alterations following cross-linking of chitosan-based coatings was supported by FTIR-ATR. Surface morphology analysis by AFM indicated good coating adsorption on aluminum surfaces. Contact angle measurements showed hydrophilic properties with contact angles >62° and <90°. Physicochemical characterization (molecular weight (kDa), deacetylation (%), humidity (%), and ash (%)) was also carried out. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness was assessed by gravimetric tests after immersion studies, and the results highlighted the MMW-Chi-based coating’s performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition)
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11 pages, 4861 KiB  
Article
Seawater Corrosion of Copper and Its Alloy Coated with Hydrothermal Carbon
by Yong X. Gan, Yizhe Chang, Chuan-Chiang Chen, Mingheng Li, Jeremy B. Gan and Joseph Li
Coatings 2022, 12(6), 798; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12060798 - 8 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1644
Abstract
Nonferrous materials such as copper and its alloys are sensitive to seawater corrosion. In this work, a hydrothermal carbonization coating was deposited on a C26000 brass and pure copper. The effectiveness of the coating on improving seawater corrosion performance was examined. First, hydrothermal [...] Read more.
Nonferrous materials such as copper and its alloys are sensitive to seawater corrosion. In this work, a hydrothermal carbonization coating was deposited on a C26000 brass and pure copper. The effectiveness of the coating on improving seawater corrosion performance was examined. First, hydrothermal carbonization of sugar (with 10 wt.% sucrose in water) at 200 °C and 1.35 MPa for 4 h was performed to generate the carbon-rich coating. The results of surface morphology, composition, hardness, thickness, and wettability to seawater were presented. Then, the corrosion resistance of the brass and pure copper with and without coating was evaluated by measuring the Tafel constants in seawater. Important parameters including the corrosion current, potentials of corrosion, and polarization resistance for the brass and pure copper with and without the coating were calculated from the polarization measurement data. It was found that the hydrothermal carbonization of sugar produced a relatively dense carbon-rich layer on the surface of the copper and brass specimens. This carbon layer has a thickness of 120 µm, and it is highly corrosion resistant. The corrosion current of the copper and its alloy in seawater is reduced significantly through the hydrothermal carbonization treatment. The carbonized coating reduced the corrosion current obviously, but only resulted in a small positive shift of 0.05–0.1 V in the corrosion potentials. The hydrothermally produced carbon layer is just like a passivation coating on the pure copper and copper alloy to slow down their corrosion rates in seawater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Corrosion-Resistant Coatings, 2nd Edition)
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