Special Issue "Composite Carbon Fibers"

A special issue of Journal of Composites Science (ISSN 2504-477X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yong X. Gan
Website
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA 91768, USA
Interests: materials processing; composite materials; fibers; manufacturing; nanotechnology; energy conversion; mechanical design; mechanics of materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Composite carbon fibers consist of multiple phases, a continuous carbon phase and additive phases. The continuous carbon fiber phase serves as the matrix, which provides the mechanical strength for the composite fibers. The additive phases including oxide particles, carbon nanotubes, organic or inorganic coatings, and graphene sheets are functional components. Such functional components allow composite carbon fibers to be useful in various fields. For example, ceramics-coated carbon fibers can improve the thermal shock and ablation property of high-temperature-resistant composite materials. Bi–Te or Sb–Te particle-containing carbon fibers demonstrate excellent thermoelectric energy conversion performance. Iron-oxide-loaded carbon fibers have been considered to be used as anode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries. Titanium oxide nanoparticle-embedded carbon fibers show photovoltaic behavior. Composite carbon fibers are also proposed for building flexible sensors and energy convertors.

The objective of this Special Issue is to provide a forum for researchers to publish important findings and exchange ideas on the fundamental studies and applications of composite carbon fibers. Research papers and review articles are welcome. The scope of the Special Issue is on, but not limited to, the following topics: composite carbon fiber processing and manufacturing technology, structure and morphology studies, mechanical testing, physical property characterization, electrochemical performance evaluation, and exploration of new applications.

Dr. Yong X. Gan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Composites Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Composite carbon fiber
  • Processing method
  • Manufacturing technology
  • Activated composite carbon fiber
  • Particle-containing carbon fiber
  • Nanotube-added carbon fiber
  • Coating on carbon fiber
  • Energy storage
  • Mechanical property
  • Failure mechanisms
  • Sensing
  • Energy conversion
  • Environment protection
  • Water purification
  • High temperature resistance
  • Oxidation prevention
  • Catalysis
  • Biomedical applications
  • Photovoltaics
  • Thermoelectricity
  • Flexible electronics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Advances in Manufacturing Composite Carbon Nanofiber-Based Aerogels
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(2), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4020073 - 16 Jun 2020
Abstract
This article provides an overview on manufacturing composite carbon nanofiber-based aerogels through freeze casting technology. As known, freeze casting is a relatively new manufacturing technique for generating highly porous structures. During the process, deep cooling is used first to rapidly solidify a well-dispersed [...] Read more.
This article provides an overview on manufacturing composite carbon nanofiber-based aerogels through freeze casting technology. As known, freeze casting is a relatively new manufacturing technique for generating highly porous structures. During the process, deep cooling is used first to rapidly solidify a well-dispersed slurry. Then, vacuum drying is conducted to sublimate the solvent. This allows the creation of highly porous materials. Although the freeze casting technique was initially developed for porous ceramics processing, it has found various applications, especially for making aerogels. Aerogels are highly porous materials with extremely high volume of free spaces, which contributes to the characteristics of high porosity, ultralight, large specific surface area, huge interface area, and in addition, super low thermal conductivity. Recently, carbon nanofiber aerogels have been studied to achieve exceptional properties of high stiffness, flame-retardant and thermal-insulating. The freeze casting technology has been reported for preparing carbon nanofiber composite aerogels for energy storage, energy conversion, water purification, catalysis, fire prevention etc. This review deals with freeze casting carbon nanofiber composite materials consisting of functional nanoparticles with exceptional properties. The content of this review article is organized as follows. The first part will introduce the general freeze casting manufacturing technology of aerogels with the emphasis on how to use the technology to make nanoparticle-containing composite carbon nanofiber aerogels. Then, modeling and characterization of the freeze cast particle-containing carbon nanofibers will be presented with an emphasis on modeling the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity of the carbon nanofiber network aerogels. After that, the applications of the carbon nanofiber aerogels will be described. Examples of energy converters, supercapacitors, secondary battery electrodes, dye absorbents, sensors, and catalysts made from composite carbon nanofiber aerogels will be shown. Finally, the perspectives to future work will be presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Composite Carbon Fibers)
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Open AccessTechnical Note
Remanufacturing of Woven Carbon Fibre Fabric Production Waste into High Performance Aligned Discontinuous Fibre Composites
J. Compos. Sci. 2020, 4(2), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcs4020068 - 06 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The composites industry generates considerable volumes of waste in a wide variety of forms, from the production of by-products to end-of-life parts. This paper focuses on the remanufacturing of dry fibre off-cuts, produced during the composite fabric weaving process, into highly aligned discontinuous [...] Read more.
The composites industry generates considerable volumes of waste in a wide variety of forms, from the production of by-products to end-of-life parts. This paper focuses on the remanufacturing of dry fibre off-cuts, produced during the composite fabric weaving process, into highly aligned discontinuous fibre prepreg tapes with High Performance Discontinuous Fibre (HiPerDiF) technology. Unidirectional laminate specimens are prepared using various combinations of fibre lengths and tested in tension, obtaining a stiffness of 80 GPa, a strength of 800 MPa, and a failure strain of 1%. Several applications are envisaged for the produced tape: adhesive film, feedstock for filament winding, and tow for weaved fabrics. This work demonstrates the possibility to extract value from what is currently considered manufacturing waste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Composite Carbon Fibers)
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