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Effects of Nanoparticles on Living Organisms 2.0

A special issue of Current Issues in Molecular Biology (ISSN 1467-3045). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 4419

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Maternal-Fetal Biology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: cell therapy; regenerative therapy; cell biotechnology; 3D culture; nanoparticles; bioimaging; biobank; cryopreservation; stem cell; health technology assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to examine the effects of nanoparticles on living organisms (human or animal, organs, tissues, and cells). Nanoparticles are used in food, agriculture, drug discovery, and medicine (prevention and diagnosis). For example, in the medical field, it is used as a contrast agent in MRI and PET to reveal the internal structure of blood vessels, organs, and tissues. In the drug discovery field, drugs must be safe and effective, and must be able to be delivered to the target site. Therefore, we need to understand the properties and behavior of nanoparticles. Otherwise, they can cause respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, as well as immunological, inflammatory, and allergic diseases.

Nanoparticles that have adsorbed or absorbed toxic substances, particulate matter (e.g., PM2.5), and inorganic dust in the environment significantly impact living organisms in terms of health effects, exposure, toxicity, and body dynamics and deposition. In the current social discourse, particulate matter is cited as key to the risk of viral infections (SARS-Cov-2 virus: COVID-19) and serious illnesses.

Here, we call for reports on the effects of nanoparticles on living organisms (nanoparticles functionalization, in vitro/in vivo evaluation, 3D models, ADME, toxicity, and biomedical applications, etc.) at the molecular level. Therefore, this Special Issue seeks to publish high-quality articles, including original research, reviews, short communications, and clinical trials.

Dr. Yoshitaka Miyamoto
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Issues in Molecular Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • particulate matter
  • medicine
  • prevention
  • diagnosis
  • drug delivery
  • environment
  • nanoparticles functionalization
  • in vitro/in vivo evaluation
  • 3D model
  • ADME
  • toxicity
  • biomedical applications
  • respiratory and cardiovascular diseases
  • immunological, inflammatory, and allergic diseases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1228 KiB  
Article
The Cytotoxicity of Cotyledon orbiculata Aqueous Extract and the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles Derived from the Extract
by Caroline Tyavambiza, Mervin Meyer, Adedoja Dorcas Wusu, Abram Madiehe and Samantha Meyer
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(12), 10109-10120; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45120631 - 14 Dec 2023
Viewed by 943
Abstract
Green synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have become popular because of their promising biological activities. However, for most of these nanoparticles, the cytotoxic effects have not been determined and their safety is not guaranteed. In a previous study, we successfully synthesized AgNPs (Cotyledon [...] Read more.
Green synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have become popular because of their promising biological activities. However, for most of these nanoparticles, the cytotoxic effects have not been determined and their safety is not guaranteed. In a previous study, we successfully synthesized AgNPs (Cotyledon-AgNPs) using an extract of Cotyledon orbiculata, a medicinal plant traditionally used in South Africa to treat skin conditions. Cotyledon-AgNPs were shown to have significant antimicrobial and wound-healing activities. Fibroblast cells treated with extracts of C. orbiculata and Cotyledon-AgNPs demonstrated an enhanced growth rate, which is essential in wound healing. These nanoparticles therefore have promising wound-healing activities. However, the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles is not known. In this study, the toxic effects of C. orbiculata extract and Cotyledon-AgNPs on the non-cancerous skin fibroblast (KMST-6) were determined using in vitro assays to assess oxidative stress and cell death. Both the C. orbiculata extract and the Cotyledon-AgNPs did not show any significant cytotoxic effects in these assays. Gene expression analysis was also used to assess the cytotoxic effects of Cotyledon-AgNPs at a molecular level. Of the eighty-four molecular toxicity genes analysed, only eight (FASN, SREBF1, CPT2, ASB1, HSPA1B, ABCC2, CASP9, and MKI67) were differentially expressed. These genes are mainly involved in fatty acid and mitochondrial energy metabolism. The results support the finding that Cotyledon-AgNPs have low cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested. The upregulation of genes such as FASN, SERBF1, and MKI-67 also support previous findings that Cotyledon-AgNPs can promote wound healing via cell growth and proliferation. It can therefore be concluded that Cotyledon-AgNPs are not toxic to skin fibroblast cells at the concentration that promotes wound healing. These nanoparticles could possibly be safely used for wound healing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Nanoparticles on Living Organisms 2.0)
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12 pages, 2943 KiB  
Article
Biodistribution of Fluorescent Albumin Nanoparticles among Organs of Laboratory Animals after Intranasal and Peroral Administration
by Olga Morozova, Elena Isaeva and Dmitry Klinov
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(10), 8227-8238; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45100519 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1033
Abstract
Natural, environmental and engineered nanoparticles (NP) penetrate into cells by endocytosis and induce innate immunity. The behaviour of the nanomaterials both in vitro and in vivo should be assessed. Our goal was to study protein NP stability in biological fluids and distribution in [...] Read more.
Natural, environmental and engineered nanoparticles (NP) penetrate into cells by endocytosis and induce innate immunity. The behaviour of the nanomaterials both in vitro and in vivo should be assessed. Our goal was to study protein NP stability in biological fluids and distribution in organs of animals after intranasal and oral administration. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was labelled with the fluorescent dye RhoB and NP were fabricated by nanoprecipitation. The fluorescent protein NPwere administered intranasally and orally in laboratory-outbred mice ICR and rabbits. RhoB-BSA NP distribution in organs was detected using spectrofluorometry and fluorescent microscopy. Innate immunity was evaluated using reverse transcription with random hexanucleotide primer and subsequent real-time PCR with specific fluorescent hydrolysis probes. The labelled BSA NP were shown to remain stable in blood sera and nasopharyngeal swabs for 5 days at +37 °C. In vivo the maximal accumulation was found in the brain in 2 days posttreatment without prevalent accumulation in olfactory bulbs. For the intestine, heart and liver, the BSA NP accumulation was similar in 1 and 2 days, whereas for kidney samples even decreased after 1 day. Both intranasal and peroral administration of RhoB-BSA NP did not induce innate immunity. Thus, after intranasal or oral instillation RhoB-BSA NP were found mainly in the brain and intestine without interferon gene expression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Nanoparticles on Living Organisms 2.0)
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Review

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33 pages, 9114 KiB  
Review
The Utilization of Plant-Material-Loaded Vesicular Drug Delivery Systems in the Management of Pulmonary Diseases
by Bongani Sannyboy Lukhele, Kokoette Bassey and Bwalya Angel Witika
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(12), 9985-10017; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45120624 - 12 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1577
Abstract
Medicinal plants have been utilized to treat a variety of conditions on account of the bioactive properties that they contain. Most bioactive constituents from plants are of limited effectiveness, due to poor solubility, limited permeability, first-pass metabolism, efflux transporters, chemical instability, and food–drug [...] Read more.
Medicinal plants have been utilized to treat a variety of conditions on account of the bioactive properties that they contain. Most bioactive constituents from plants are of limited effectiveness, due to poor solubility, limited permeability, first-pass metabolism, efflux transporters, chemical instability, and food–drug interactions However, when combined with vesicular drug delivery systems (VDDS), herbal medicines can be delivered at a predetermined rate and can exhibit site-specific action. Vesicular drug delivery systems are novel pharmaceutical formulations that make use of vesicles as a means of encapsulating and transporting drugs to various locations within the body; they are a cutting-edge method of medication delivery that combats the drawbacks of conventional drug delivery methods. Drug delivery systems offer promising strategies to overcome the bioavailability limitations of bioactive phytochemicals. By improving their solubility, protecting them from degradation, enabling targeted delivery, and facilitating controlled release, drug delivery systems can enhance the therapeutic efficacy of phytochemicals and unlock their full potential in various health conditions. This review explores and collates the application of plant-based VDDS with the potential to exhibit protective effects against lung function loss in the interest of innovative and effective treatment and management of respiratory illnesses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Nanoparticles on Living Organisms 2.0)
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