Special Issue "Complementary and Integrative Movement Therapies for Children"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Integrative Pediatrics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ina Stephens
Website
Guest Editor
University of Virgina Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 1215 Lee Street, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA
Interests: Yoga, Medical Yoga; Yoga Therapy; Depression; Anxiety; Mental Health; Infectious Diseases; Vaccines

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Complementary and Integrative movement-based therapies are described as interventions that place the focus on changing one’s thoughts to change one’s behavior patterns. These therapies are often an exploration of multiple dimensions, including the physical body, energy, mind–body awareness, emotions, and spiritual feelings.  Some of these, considered to be of increasing importance in the treatment of chronic diseases and functional disorders, include yoga, mindful movement, osteopathic manipulation, pranayama, art therapy, sound therapy, massage therapy, music therapy, and integrated movement therapy. With the use of these interventions, one can develop improved body awareness, leading one towards realizing the connections between the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual realms. This increased awareness allows one to recognize thoughts and emotions at an earlier, or subtler, stage, enabling earlier interventions, coping, and healing. This Special Issue will explore a range of complementary and integrative movement therapies in children and adolescents with the goal of further educating medical professionals on their use for treating disorders such as chronic pain, depression, anxiety, asthma, ADHD, obesity, autism, high-risk pregnancies, and sleep disorders.

Ina Stephens, MD, RYT, CYT, FAAP
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Yoga
  • Yoga Therapy
  • Pranayama
  • Qigong
  • Integrative Health
  • Mental Health
  • Mindfulness
  • Massage
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Osteopathic Manipulation
  • Sound Therapy
  • Art Therapy
  • Zumba
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Go Girls!—Dance-Based Fitness to Increase Enjoyment of Exercise in Girls at Risk for PCOS
Children 2019, 6(9), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6090099 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
Weight loss can reduce the hyperandrogenemia associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in peripubertal girls. Yet, adolescent girls have the lowest rates of physical activity and enjoyment of exercise. We created a dance-based support group (Go Girls!) to entice physical activity and improve [...] Read more.
Weight loss can reduce the hyperandrogenemia associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in peripubertal girls. Yet, adolescent girls have the lowest rates of physical activity and enjoyment of exercise. We created a dance-based support group (Go Girls!) to entice physical activity and improve enjoyment. Girls ages 7–21 over the 85th BMI percentile were recruited and attended once-weekly sessions for 3–6 months. We assessed changes in Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES), anthropometrics, laboratory data, and amounts of home exercise at 0, 3, and 6 months. Sixteen girls completed either 3 or 6 months. PACES scores were surprisingly high at baseline and remained high. Systolic blood pressure percentile decreased post-intervention. Although no group differences were observed, the majority of individual girls had decreased waist circumference, triglycerides, and metabolic syndrome severity score. Forty percent had decreased free testosterone levels. More girls enjoyed physical education class, got exercise outside of school, and made other lifestyle changes. This dance-based support group was enjoyed by girls and demonstrated health benefits. Continued efforts to engage girls in physical activity are necessary to protect girls from the consequences of obesity, including PCOS and metabolic syndrome. Dance exercise remains a promising tool to encourage physical activity in girls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Complementary and Integrative Movement Therapies for Children)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Complementary and Integrative Management of Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Implemented within an Interprofessional Clinic
Children 2019, 6(8), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6080088 - 30 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Lower urinary tract dysfunction in children is a common multifactorial functional problem that often correlates with bowel dysfunction and behavioral disorders. Ideal management combines integrative therapies that optimize bladder and bowel habits, address behavioral issues, foster mind–body connection, and improve pelvic floor muscle [...] Read more.
Lower urinary tract dysfunction in children is a common multifactorial functional problem that often correlates with bowel dysfunction and behavioral disorders. Ideal management combines integrative therapies that optimize bladder and bowel habits, address behavioral issues, foster mind–body connection, and improve pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Movement therapies that teach diaphragmatic breathing and relaxation, mind–body awareness, and healthy pelvic floor muscle function are vital for long-term symptom improvement in children. This paper outlines recommendations for integrative management of these patients and discusses a recently developed interprofessional clinic that aims to better meet these patients’ complex needs and to provide patients with an integrated holistic plan of care. Additional work is needed to scientifically assess these treatment models and educate providers across the various disciplines that evaluate and treat these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Complementary and Integrative Movement Therapies for Children)
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Open AccessReview
Pediatric Massage Therapy Research: A Narrative Review
Children 2019, 6(6), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6060078 - 06 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
This narrative review on pediatric massage literature from the last decade suggests that massage therapy has positive effects on several pediatric conditions. These include preterm infant growth, psychological problems including aggression, gastrointestinal problems including constipation and diarrhea, painful conditions including burns and sickle [...] Read more.
This narrative review on pediatric massage literature from the last decade suggests that massage therapy has positive effects on several pediatric conditions. These include preterm infant growth, psychological problems including aggression, gastrointestinal problems including constipation and diarrhea, painful conditions including burns and sickle cell, muscle tone disorders including cerebral palsy and Down syndrome, and chronic illnesses including diabetes, asthma cancer, and HIV. Potential underlying mechanisms for the massage therapy effects include increased vagal activity and decreased stress hormones. Limitations of the literature include the need for more randomized controlled trials, longitudinal studies, and underlying mechanism studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Complementary and Integrative Movement Therapies for Children)

Other

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Open AccessBrief Report
Immediate Effect of a Yoga Breathing Practice on Attention and Anxiety in Pre-Teen Children
Children 2019, 6(7), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6070084 - 22 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Pre-teen children face stressors related to their transition from childhood to adolescence, with a simultaneous increase in academic pressure. The present study compared the immediate effects of 18 min of (i) high frequency yoga breathing with (ii) yoga-based breath awareness and (iii) sitting [...] Read more.
Pre-teen children face stressors related to their transition from childhood to adolescence, with a simultaneous increase in academic pressure. The present study compared the immediate effects of 18 min of (i) high frequency yoga breathing with (ii) yoga-based breath awareness and (iii) sitting quietly, on (a) attention and (b) anxiety, in 61 pre-teen children (aged between 11 and 12 years; 25 girls). Attention was assessed using a six letter cancellation task and Spielberger’s State Trait Anxiety Inventory STAI-S was used to measure anxiety before and after the three practices, practiced on separate days. Repeated measures ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni adjusted post-hoc analyses showed an increase in total attempts and net scores after high frequency yoga breathing (p < 0.05), while wrong attempts increased after yoga based breath awareness (p < 0.05). Anxiety decreased comparably after all three interventions. The 25 girls in the group had the same trend of results as the whole group with respect to the attention-based cancellation task, while boys showed no, how since change. For both girls and boys, anxiety decreased after all three 18min interventions. The results suggest that high frequency yoga breathing could be a short, useful school based practice to improve attention and reduce anxiety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Complementary and Integrative Movement Therapies for Children)
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