Porous Materials: Design, Synthesis and Advanced Catalytic Applications

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Catalytic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 5279

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics and Catalysis (COMOC), Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 (S3), 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Interests: porous materials; metal–organic frameworks (MOFs); covalent organic frameworks; heterogeneous catalysis; photocatalysis; electrocatalysis; adsorption; water purification

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, China
Interests: porous materials; heterogeneous catalysis; flow synthesis of nanomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Chemistry, Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics and Catalysis (COMOC), Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 (S3), 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Interests: metal–organic frameworks; covalent organic frameworks; (electro)catalysis; adsorption
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The research field of nanoporous materials is an interesting and exciting topic with countless researchers involved worldwide. Two types of hybrid solids have been developed during the last decade and are considered important subjects in this field. The first class includes porous organic frameworks (POFs), a general term for covalent–organic frameworks (COFs), covalent triazine frameworks (CTFs), porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs), hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs), etc. POFs are made from organic building monomers with strong covalent bonds and have attracted a great amount of interest among researchers. The second class covers a range of solids, both oxides and non-oxides, crystalline and amorphous (zeolites, silica, metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), etc.). The variation in porous materials provides a promising platform for all different kinds of advanced applications.

The main aim of this Special Issue of Catalysts is to provide an overview of the most relevant and recent findings in the field of porous materials for advanced applications, which can be applied in (but not limited to) catalysis, adsorption, environmental remediation, sensing, and energy storage applications. Some of the key topics relevant to this Special Issue are: 

  • Synthesis and characterization of porous organic materials (COFs, CTFs, PAFs, POPs, etc.);
  • Synthesis and characterization of porous inorganic materials (zeolite, silica, MOFs etc.);
  • Porous materials for catalysis;
  • Adsorption and gas storage/capture with porous materials;
  • Porous materials for sensing;
  • Porous materials for energy storage;
  • Environmental remediation with porous materials.

Dr. Sara Abednatanzi
Dr. Ying-Ya Liu
Dr. Karen Leus
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • porous organic materials
  • porous inorganic materials
  • zeolites
  • silica
  • metal oxides
  • POPs
  • COFs
  • CTFs
  • MOFs
  • catalysis
  • adsorption
  • sensing
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 14163 KiB  
Article
Generation of ZSM-5 Nanocrystallites and Their Assembly into Hierarchical Architecture in a Phase-Transfer Synthesis
by Xiaoling Zhao, Jinlong He and Jinjin Li
Catalysts 2022, 12(10), 1216; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12101216 - 12 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1554
Abstract
A method of phase-transfer water/toluene synthesis was developed to fabricate mesocrystals of Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) that contain both meso-/micropores and nanometer crystallites. The construction of a hierarchical architecture from nanozeolites via oriented attachment growth was achieved by a simple phase-transfer water/toluene synthesis [...] Read more.
A method of phase-transfer water/toluene synthesis was developed to fabricate mesocrystals of Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) that contain both meso-/micropores and nanometer crystallites. The construction of a hierarchical architecture from nanozeolites via oriented attachment growth was achieved by a simple phase-transfer water/toluene synthesis by minimizing classical atom-by-atom crystallization. This opens the way to the cheap, highly efficient engineering of zeolitic morphologies. The physicochemical properties of the crystal were revealed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 physical adsorption, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and pyridine infrared spectroscopy (Py-IR), indicating that the material has a high specific surface area, mesopore volume and Lewis acid content. The hierarchical ZSM-5 exhibits a prolonged catalytic lifetime in dimethyl ether–methyl ether (DTO) conversion and enhanced selectivity for propylene owing to the enhanced structural properties. The method can be extended to the synthesis of other graded zeolites controlled by the crystallization process and produce crystals comprising traversing mesoporosity and ultrasmall crystallites that are crucial for mass transfer enhancement. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 2661 KiB  
Article
A ‘Defective’ Conjugated Porous Poly-Azo as Dual Photocatalyst
by Ipsita Nath, Jeet Chakraborty, Sara Abednatanzi and Pascal Van Der Voort
Catalysts 2021, 11(9), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11091064 - 31 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2717
Abstract
A heterogeneous photocatalyst amenable to catalyze different chemical reactions is a highly enabling and sustainable material for organic synthesis. Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of an azobenzene-based organic π–conjugated porous polymer (AzoCPP) as heterogeneous dual photocatalyst manifesting net-oxidative bromination of arenes [...] Read more.
A heterogeneous photocatalyst amenable to catalyze different chemical reactions is a highly enabling and sustainable material for organic synthesis. Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of an azobenzene-based organic π–conjugated porous polymer (AzoCPP) as heterogeneous dual photocatalyst manifesting net-oxidative bromination of arenes and dehydroxylation of boronic acids to corresponding phenols. Hierarchical porosity and high surface area of the nano-sized AzoCPP allowed superior catalyst-substrate contact during catalyses, whereas the inherent structural defect present in the CPP backbone resulted in low-energy sinks functioning as de facto catalytic sites. A combination of these two structure-property aspects of AzoCPP, in addition to the dielectric constant manipulation of the system, led to excellent catalytic performance. The protocols remained valid for a wide substrate scope and the catalyst was recycled multiple times without substantial loss in catalytic activity. With the aid of subsequent control experiments and analytical characterizations, mechanisms for each catalysis are proposed and duly corroborated. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop