Special Issue "MOFs for Advanced Applications"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Catalytic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jorge Bedia Website E-Mail
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Chemical Engineering Department, Madrid, Spain
Interests: carbon materials, biomass-derived carbons, template carbons, catalysis, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), photocatalysis, hydrodechlorination, adsorption, supported/encapsulated ionic liquids, metal organic frameworks
Guest Editor
Prof. Carolina Belver Website E-Mail
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Chemical Engineering Department, Madrid, Spain
Interests: design, processing, and evaluation of novel heterostructures for applications in environmental remediation; water purification by photocatalysis with different materials, including MOFs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous materials with a modular structure. This allows for a very wide structural diversity and the possibility of synthesizing materials with tailored properties for advanced applications. Thus, MOF materials are the subject of intense research, with strong relevance to both science and technology. MOFs are formed by the assembly of two components: Cluster or metal ion nodes, which are also called secondary building units (SBUs), and organic linkers between the SBUs, usually giving rise to crystalline structures with an open framework and significant porous texture development. The main aim of this Special Issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344) is to present the most relevant and recent insights in the field of synthesis and characterization of MOFs and MOF-based materials for advanced applications, including adsorption, gas storage/capture, drug delivery, catalysis, photocatalysis, and/or chemical sensing. Some of the key topics relevant to this Special Issue are: 

  • Synthesis and characterization of novel MOFs or MOF-based materials, including new synthetic routes;        
  • Porous MOFs for adsorption and gas storage/capture;
  • Drug delivery application with MOF based-materials;
  • Catalysis and photocatalysis with MOFs;
  • Synthesis of MOFs for chemical sensing;
  • Energy storage in MOFs. 

We look forward to your submission.

Prof. Jorge Bedia
Prof. Carolina Belver
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • MOFs
  • gas storage
  • adsorption
  • catalysis
  • photocatalysis
  • CO2 capture
  • energy storage
  • drug delivery

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Replacement of Chromium by Non-Toxic Metals in Lewis-Acid MOFs: Assessment of Stability as Glucose Conversion Catalysts
Catalysts 2019, 9(5), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9050437 - 09 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The metal–organic framework MIL-101(Cr) is known as a solid–acid catalyst for the solution conversion of biomass-derived glucose to 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF). We study the substitution of Cr3+ by Fe3+ and Sc3+ in the MIL-101 structure in order to prepare more [...] Read more.
The metal–organic framework MIL-101(Cr) is known as a solid–acid catalyst for the solution conversion of biomass-derived glucose to 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF). We study the substitution of Cr3+ by Fe3+ and Sc3+ in the MIL-101 structure in order to prepare more environmentally benign catalysts. MIL-101(Fe) can be prepared, and the inclusion of Sc is possible at low levels (10% of Fe replaced). On extended synthesis times the polymorphic MIL-88B structure instead forms.Increasing the amount of Sc also only yields MIL-88B, even at short crystallisation times. The MIL-88B structure is unstable under hydrothermal conditions, but in dimethylsulfoxide solvent, it provides 5-HMF from glucose as the major product. The optimum material is a bimetallic (Fe,Sc) form of MIL-88B, which provides ~70% conversion of glucose with 35% selectivity towards 5-HMF after 3 hours at 140 °C: this offers high conversion compared to other heterogeneous catalysts reported in the same solvent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOFs for Advanced Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in MOF-based Nanocatalysts for Photo-Promoted CO2 Reduction Applications
Catalysts 2019, 9(8), 658; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9080658 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
The conversion of CO2 to valuable substances (methane, methanol, formic acid, etc.) by photocatalytic reduction has important significance for both the sustainable energy supply and clean environment technologies. This review systematically summarized recent progress in this field and pointed out the current [...] Read more.
The conversion of CO2 to valuable substances (methane, methanol, formic acid, etc.) by photocatalytic reduction has important significance for both the sustainable energy supply and clean environment technologies. This review systematically summarized recent progress in this field and pointed out the current challenges of photocatalytic CO2 reduction while using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-based materials. Firstly, we described the unique advantages of MOFs based materials for photocatalytic reduction of CO2 and its capacity to solve the existing problems. Subsequently, the latest research progress in photocatalytic CO2 reduction has been documented in detail. The catalytic reaction process, conversion efficiency, as well as the product selectivity of photocatalytic CO2 reduction while using MOFs based materials are thoroughly discussed. Specifically, in this review paper, we provide the catalytic mechanism of CO2 reduction with the aid of electronic structure investigations. Finally, the future development trend and prospect of photocatalytic CO2 reduction are anticipated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOFs for Advanced Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. The tentative title is "Application of various Metal-Organic Framework material to solution for environmental pollution as catalysts". 

Abstract: The use of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) as a present problem such as environmental pollution, disease, and toxicity have been receiving more attention in the facile developing area of nanotechnology. In this review, we discuss the basis of the metal-organic framework as well as its application in suggesting an alternative for the present problem as catalysts. In the case of filtration, we have developed a method for the preparing of the membrane by electrospinning using a polymer that is easily and eco-friendly. The MOFs were usable environmental part of catalytic activity and may provide a great material as a catalyst for the other area in the around future.
 

2. Title: Surface Modification of a MOF-based catalyst with Lewis Metal Salts for Improved Catalytic Activity in the Fixation of CO2 into polymers

Sudakar Padmanaban and Sungho Yoon*

Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

* Correspondence: Sungho Yoon, [email protected]

Keywords: heterogeneous catalysis, metal organic framework, surface modification, Zinc glutarate, CO2 fixation, polycarbonate.

Abstract: The catalyst zinc glutarate (ZnGA) is widely used in the industry for the alternating copolymerization of CO2 with epoxides. However, the activity of this heterogeneous catalyst is restricted to the outer surface of its particles. Consequently, in the current study, to increase the number of active surface metal centers, ZnGA was treated with diverse metal ions to form heterogeneous, surface-modified ZnGA-Metal chloride (ZnGA-M) composite catalysts. These catalysts were found to be highly active for the copolymerization of CO2 and propylene oxide. Among the different metal salts, the catalysts treated with ZnCl2 (ZnGA-Zn) and FeCl3 (ZnGA-Fe) exhibit ~38% and ~25% increased productivities compared to that of untreated ZnGA. In addition, these surface-modified catalysts are capable of producing high-molecular-weight polymers; thus, this simple and industrially viable surface modification method is beneficial from an environmental and industrial perspective.

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