Synthesis, Applications, and Chemical Measurements of Nanomaterials in Catalysis

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanostructured Catalysts".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 3216

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China
Interests: mechanisms of photo-induced charge transfer; monitoring the catalytic reactions on single nanoparticles
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
Interests: nanoplasmonics chemistry; photoelectrochemistry; photo-induced charge transfers; single-particle measurements; nanozymes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As an important catalyst in heterogeneous catalysis, nanomaterials are widely used in fine chemical synthesis, environmental remediation, renewable energy development, efficient biotransformation, and other areas of interest. Recently, as well as their use in thermally catalytic reactions, nanoscale catalysts play an increasingly significant role in other kinds of catalysis, such as electro-, photo-, and enzyme-mimicking catalysis. In addition to the benefits of the ease of catalyst separation and recovery, nanocatalysts allow for rapid chemical transformations because of their high surface area and specific surface energy. Moreover, nanocatalysts enable improvements in the reaction selectivity, which is a critical goal when improving conversion efficiency in catalysis, by triggering the reaction with light or other stimulations, reducing the occurrence of side reactions, altering the reaction pathway, etc. Thus, designing new, efficient nanocatalysts and exploring emerging nanocatalysis applications are still of significant interest. Consistently, spectroscopic, microscopic, and other emerging tools used in advanced measurements of nanocatalysts and nanocatalytic reactions are key to understanding the mechanism of nanocatalysis at the atomic and molecular levels, but this remains challenging.

This Special Issue is dedicated to original, novel, and high-impact contributions looking at recent advances in the use of emerging nanocatalysts for a wide variety of applications, as well as experimental and computational studies on the characterization and measurement of nanomaterial-based catalysts and catalytic reactions. Contributions related to photocatalysts, electrocatalysts, nanozymes, organic chemical transformation, CO2 conversion, N2 fixation, and energy conversion are also welcome in this issue. Rapid communications, original research articles, and review articles are all accepted.

Prof. Dr. Zhaoke Zheng
Prof. Dr. Kun Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanocatalysis
  • thermal catalysis
  • photocatalysis
  • electrocatalysis
  • photoelectrocatalysis
  • nanobiocatalysts
  • nanozymes
  • fine chemical synthesis
  • biomass
  • renewable energy
  • hydrogen generation
  • CO2 conversion
  • N2 fixation
  • environmental remediation
  • environmental catalysis
  • chemical measurements
  • spectroscopy
  • microscopy
  • in situ/operando transmission electron microscopy
  • surface chemistry
  • yield and selectivity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

20 pages, 3137 KiB  
Review
Single-Particle Measurements of Nanocatalysis with Dark-Field Microscopy
by Jing Shang, Jinsong Fan, Weiwei Qin and Kun Li
Catalysts 2022, 12(7), 764; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12070764 - 10 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2810
Abstract
Due to the complexity of heterogeneous reactions and heterogeneities of individual catalyst particles in size, morphology, and the surrounding medium, it is very important to characterize the structure of nanocatalysts and measure the reaction process of nanocatalysis at the single-particle level. Traditional ensemble [...] Read more.
Due to the complexity of heterogeneous reactions and heterogeneities of individual catalyst particles in size, morphology, and the surrounding medium, it is very important to characterize the structure of nanocatalysts and measure the reaction process of nanocatalysis at the single-particle level. Traditional ensemble measurements, however, only provide averaged results of billions of nanoparticles (NPs), which do not help reveal structure–activity relationships and may overlook a few NPs with high activity. The advent of dark-field microscopy (DFM) combined with plasmonic resonance Rayleigh scattering (PRRS) spectroscopy provides a powerful means for directly recording the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrum of single plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs), which also enables quantitative measurements. In recent years, DFM has developed rapidly for a series of single-particle catalytic reactions such as redox reactions, electrocatalytic reactions, and DNAzyme catalysis, with the ability to monitor the catalytic reaction process in real time and reveal the catalytic mechanism. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles and practical applications of DFM in measuring various kinds of catalysis (including chemocatalysis, electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, and biocatalysis) at the single-particle level. Perspectives on the remaining challenges and future trends in this field are also proposed. Full article
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