Special Issue "Personalized Medicine: Recent Progress in Cancer Therapy"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marieke H.J. van den Beuken-van Everdingen
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Guest Editor
Centre of Expertise for Palliative Care, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Interests: palliative care; cancer pain; opioids; NMDA; symptoms in cancer
Dr. Ann Hoeben
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Guest Editor
Division of Medical Oncology, GROW—School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Interests: neuro-oncology; palliative care; personolised medicine
Prof. Dr. Elbert A.J. Joosten
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Guest Editor
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Interests: neuropathic pain; NMDA; opioids; cancer pain; spinal cord; nociception; mechanism of action; pharmacology of pain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Personalized medicine (PM) or precision medicine in oncology is an emerging approach for tumor treatment and prevention, which takes into account inter- and intra-tumoral variability in genes, tumor (immune) environment, and lifestyle and morbidities of each person diagnosed with cancer. PM has the potential to tailor therapy towards the oncogenic drivers of the tumor and modulate the tumor immune environment, not only attempting to optimize tumor response, but also taking into account therapy-induced toxicities for each specific patient. In this way, optimized tumor response is combined with the preservation of organ function and quality of life, ensuring better patient care.

Biomarker development is a rapidly evolving field in PM and makes it possible to not only predict prognosis, but also to predict treatment response. Predictive biomarker models are not only defined by serum markers, but also by different imaging modalities (CT, MR, nuclear imaging modalities), creating multimodal (non-invasive) predictive platforms identifying the molecular fingerprint of the tumor.

Finetuning of predictive models will enable the construction of tumor-tailored treatment plans and improve prognostic models, which will facilitate shared decision-making, allowing for a patient-tailored treatment plan.

By enabling each patient to receive earlier diagnoses, risk assessments, and optimal treatments, PM holds promise for improving health care while also lowering costs.

This Special Issue will highlight recent advances in personalized medicine in treating cancer and its accompanying symptoms.

Prof. Dr. Marieke H.J. van den Beuken-van Everdingen
Dr. Ann Hoeben
Prof. Dr. Elbert A.J. Joosten
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • personalized medicine
  • genetics
  • epigenetics
  • immunotherapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Phase 1B Clinical Study of Combretastatin A1 Diphosphate (OXi4503) and Cytarabine (ARA-C) in Combination (OXA) for Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Cancers 2020, 12(1), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12010074 - 26 Dec 2019
Abstract
Combretastatin A1 (OXi4503) is a dual-function drug with vascular disrupting and cytotoxic properties that has exhibited single-agent anti-leukemia activity in murine xenograft models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in a prior Phase 1A clinical study for relapsed/refractory (R/R) AML. The purpose of [...] Read more.
Combretastatin A1 (OXi4503) is a dual-function drug with vascular disrupting and cytotoxic properties that has exhibited single-agent anti-leukemia activity in murine xenograft models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in a prior Phase 1A clinical study for relapsed/refractory (R/R) AML. The purpose of the present multicenter Phase 1B study was to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and safety profile of OXi4503 and cytarabine (ARA-C) administered in combination (OXA). At four centers, 29 patients with R/R AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with OXA. The most common grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were febrile neutropenia (28%), hypertension (17%), thrombocytopenia (17%), and anemia (14%). There were no treatment-emergent grade 5 AEs. Drug-related serious adverse events (SAEs) developed in 4/29 patients (14%) and included febrile neutropenia (N = 2), pneumonia/acute respiratory failure (N = 1), and hypotension (N = 1). 9.76 mg/m2 was defined as the MTD of OXi4503 when administered in combination with 1 g/m2 ARA-C. In 26 evaluable AML patients, there were 2 complete remissions (CR), 2 complete remissions with incomplete count recovery (CRi) and one partial response (PR), for an overall response rate (ORR) of 19%. The median overall survival (OS) time for the four patients who achieved a CR/CRi was 528 days (95% CI: 434–NA), which was significantly longer than the median OS time of 113 days (95% CI: 77–172) for the remaining 22 patients who did not achieve a CR/CRi (Log Rank Chi Square = 11.8, p-value = 0.0006). The safety and early evidence of efficacy of the OXA regimen in R/R AML patients warrant further investigation in a Phase 2 clinical study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Medicine: Recent Progress in Cancer Therapy)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Recurrent or Refractory High-Grade Gliomas Treated by Convection-Enhanced Delivery of a TGFβ2-Targeting RNA Therapeutic: A Post-Hoc Analysis with Long-Term Follow-Up
Cancers 2019, 11(12), 1892; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11121892 - 28 Nov 2019
Abstract
Background. OT101 is a first-in-class RNA therapeutic designed to abrogate the immunosuppressive actions of transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFβ2). Here, we report our post-hoc analysis of the single-agent activity of OT101 in adult patients with recurrent and/or refractory (R/R) [...] Read more.
Background. OT101 is a first-in-class RNA therapeutic designed to abrogate the immunosuppressive actions of transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFβ2). Here, we report our post-hoc analysis of the single-agent activity of OT101 in adult patients with recurrent and/or refractory (R/R) high-grade gliomas. Methods. In a Phase 2 clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00431561), OT101 was administered to 89 R/R high-grade glioma (HGG) (anaplastic astrocytoma/AA: 27; glioblastoma multiforme/GBM: 62) patients with an intratumoral catheter using a convection enhanced delivery (CED) system. Seventy-seven patients (efficacy population; GBM: 51; AA: 26) received at least the intended minimum number of four OT101 treatment cycles. Response determinations were based on central review of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans according to the McDonald criteria. Standard statistical methods were applied for the analysis of data. Findings. Nineteen patients had a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) following a slow but robust size reduction of their target lesions (median time for 90% reduction of the baseline tumor volume = 11.7 months, range: 4.9–57.7 months). The mean log reduction of the tumor volume was 2.2 ± 0.4 (median = 1.4: range: 0.4–4.5) logs. In addition, seven patients had a stable disease (SD) lasting ≥6 months. For the combined group of 26 AA/GBM patients with favorable responses, the median progression-free survival (PFS) of 1109 days and overall survival (OS) of 1280 days were significantly better than the median PFS (p < 0.00001) and OS (p < 0.00001) of the non-responders among the 89 patients or the 77-patient efficacy population. Conclusion. Intratumorally administered OT101 exhibits clinically meaningful single-agent activity and induces durable CR/PR/SD in R/R HGG patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Medicine: Recent Progress in Cancer Therapy)
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