Role of Cytokines in Cancer

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Tumor Microenvironment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2024 | Viewed by 1041

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Biological Sciences, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209, USA
2. Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37209, USA
Interests: biomarkers; solid-organ transplantation; inflammatory cytokines; cancer immunology; advanced drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past two decades, there has been an expansion in the understanding of the role of chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis. Infiltrating inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment secrete a wide array of cytokines, which play a critical role in various aspects of carcinogenesis. Cytokines, upon binding with their specific receptors on the immune and tumor cells, trigger oncogenic signaling pathways, which impact various aspects of cancer progression and metastasis. An in-depth understanding of these pathways offers avenues for multiple clinical applications, varying from diagnostics to drug discovery. Advances in technologies such as next-generation sequencing, CyTOF and liquid biopsy offer an enhanced understanding of the tumor microenvironment. In this Special Issue, entitled "Cytokines and Cancer", authors are invited to contribute original research papers or review that provide critical insights into the role of cytokines in molecular events leading to the development and progression of cancer.

Dr. Venkataswarup Tiriveedhi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • inflammation
  • tumor microenvironment
  • cytokines

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 1075 KiB  
Article
Lymphocyte Function at Baseline Could Be a New Predictor of Tumor Burden following Six Cycles of Radium-223 Therapy in Patients with Metastasized, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer
by Vahé Barsegian, Daniel Möckel, Sebastian Buehler, Stefan P. Müller, Michael C. Kreissl, Patrick Ostheim, Peter A. Horn and Monika Lindemann
Cancers 2024, 16(5), 886; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16050886 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 782
Abstract
Previous data indicate that one cycle of treatment with radium-223 (223Ra) did not significantly impair lymphocyte function in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. The aim of the current study was to assess in 21 patients whether six cycles of this [...] Read more.
Previous data indicate that one cycle of treatment with radium-223 (223Ra) did not significantly impair lymphocyte function in patients with metastasized, castration-resistant prostate cancer. The aim of the current study was to assess in 21 patients whether six cycles of this therapy had an effect on lymphocyte proliferation and interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 ELISpot results. Lymphocyte proliferation after stimulation with microbial antigens and the production of interferon-γ continuously decreased after six cycles of radionuclide therapy, reaching statistical significance (p < 0.05) at months 1, 2, 4, and/or 6 after therapy. One month after the last cycle of therapy, 67% of patients showed a decrease in tumor burden. The tumor burden correlated negatively with IL-10 secretion at baseline, e.g., after stimulation with tetanus antigen (p < 0.0001, r = −0.82). As determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tetanus-specific IL-10 spots at baseline had the highest predictive value (p = 0.005) for tumor burden at month 6, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90 (sensitivity 100%, specificity 78%). In conclusion, we observed an additive effect of treatment with 223Ra on immune function and found that IL-10 secretion at baseline predicted tumor burden at month 6 after treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Cytokines in Cancer)
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