Special Issue "Characterization and Structural Rehabilitation of Ancient Masonry Buildings"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2023 | Viewed by 3083

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fernando F. S. Pinho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CERIS, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: constructive and mechanical characterization of walls and foundations of ancient buildings; anomalies and inspection techniques; structural rehabilitation of ancient buildings; experimental analysis; building materials
Prof. Dr. Humberto Varum
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CONSTRUCT, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: earthquake engineering; structural analysis; seismic analysis of RC buildings; structural repair and maintenance of buildings; structural health monitoring; structural testing and modelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

All over the world, there are countless ancient masonry buildings, and other structures, built by our ancestors, many hundreds and even thousands of years ago.

Many of these constructions, in particular the historic/classified buildings (e.g., monumental, imperial, or religious buildings), have undergone maintenance and conservation action over time, which has allowed them to survive in adequate habitability and safety conditions. However, many other buildings and masonry constructions built in urban and rural environments did not have the same interventions, and collapsed due to either lack of conservation or natural actions, such as earthquakes, floods, fires, landslides, or other man-made actions, e.g., wars and attacks.

The current generation of technicians and scientists has the duty, and interest, of preserving the important heritage of classified and unclassified buildings. Many authors have dedicated decades of study to these topics for the huge diversity of materials constituting the masonry. This Special Issue of Buildings aims to gather and disseminate research works related to experimental and/or numerical studies and case studies on the constructive and mechanical characterization of walls and foundations of ancient buildings, anomalies, inspection techniques and structural assessment, and rehabilitation and strengthening of ancient constructions.

Prof. Dr. Fernando F. S. Pinho
Prof. Dr. Humberto Varum
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • ancient buildings
  • characterization of walls and foundations
  • anomalies
  • inspection
  • structural rehabilitation
  • strengthening
  • experimental analysis
  • numerical modelling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Simulation Analysis of the Small Wild Goose Pagoda Structure Using a Shape Memory Alloy-Suspension Pendulum Damping System (SMA-SPDS)
Buildings 2022, 12(5), 686; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12050686 - 20 May 2022
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Abstract
To reduce the effects of earthquakes on the ancient Small Wild Goose Pagoda, a shape memory alloy-suspension pendulum damping system (SMA-SPDS) is developed by combining superelastic SMAs with damping pendulum theory. A MATLAB/Simulink simulation model of the SMA-SPDS is established and tested on [...] Read more.
To reduce the effects of earthquakes on the ancient Small Wild Goose Pagoda, a shape memory alloy-suspension pendulum damping system (SMA-SPDS) is developed by combining superelastic SMAs with damping pendulum theory. A MATLAB/Simulink simulation model of the SMA-SPDS is established and tested on a 1:10 scale model of the Pagoda. After verifying and comparing the simulation data with experimental results, a shock absorption analysis is performed on the prototype Pagoda. The optimum engineering design for the prototype structure of the Small Wild Goose Pagoda using SMA-SPDS for shock absorption protection in the future is put forward. The results show that the performance of the SMA-SPDS system is stable, and it can improve the integrity of the original structure of the Pagoda for better performance during earthquakes. In addition, with an increment in seismic intensity, the SMA-SPDS shows an apparent controlling effect. The Simulink simulation results of the model structure of the Small Wild Goose Pagoda are in good agreement with the test results. The Simulink simulation method can simulate the seismic response of the model structure of the Small Wild Goose Pagoda well, with and without SMA-SPDS, to obtain a more real damping effect of setting SMA-SPDS on the prototype structure; the engineering optimization of the location, quantity, and system performance parameters of SMA-SPDS in the prototype structure of the Small Wild Goose Pagoda has a remarkable effect, which can make the damping effect of SMA-SPDS reach more than 43% floor. Full article
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Article
Experimental Study on the Compressive Behaviors of Brick Masonry Strengthened with Modified Oyster Shell Ash Mortar
Buildings 2021, 11(7), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11070266 - 23 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Masonry bricks were widely used in construction of the walls in most of Chinese historical buildings. The low strength of lime–clay mortar used in existing historical brick masonry walls has usually led to poor performance such as cracking and collapse during earthquakes. As [...] Read more.
Masonry bricks were widely used in construction of the walls in most of Chinese historical buildings. The low strength of lime–clay mortar used in existing historical brick masonry walls has usually led to poor performance such as cracking and collapse during earthquakes. As the composition of modified oyster shell ash mortar (MOSA mortar) with higher strength is similar to that of lime–clay mortar, it can be used to partially replace original lime–clay mortar for historical brick masonry buildings in order to improve their seismic performance. Previous research has proven that this strengthening method for brick masonry is effective in improving shear strength. In this paper, we present further experimental research regarding the compressive behaviors of brick masonry strengthened by replacing mortar with a MOSA mortar. The test results showed that the compressive strength of brick masonry specimens strengthened by the proposed method meets the design requirements. The formula for calculating compressive strength for brick masonry strengthened by replacing mortar was obtained by fitting the test results. The calculated values were consistent with the tested ones. In addition, the stress–strain relationship of tested specimens under axial compression was simulated using the parabolic model. Full article
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Article
Masonry Dome Behavior under Gravity Loads Based on the Support Condition by Considering Variable Curves and Thicknesses
Buildings 2021, 11(6), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11060241 - 04 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1147
Abstract
It is necessary to recognize masonry domes’ behavior under gravity loads in order to strengthen, restore, and conserve them. The neutral hoop plays a crucial role in identifying the masonry dome’s behavior to distinguish between its tensile and compressive regions. When it comes [...] Read more.
It is necessary to recognize masonry domes’ behavior under gravity loads in order to strengthen, restore, and conserve them. The neutral hoop plays a crucial role in identifying the masonry dome’s behavior to distinguish between its tensile and compressive regions. When it comes to determining the neutral hoop position in a dome with the same brick material, in addition to determining the dome’s curve and thickness, the support condition located on the boundary line is a significant parameter that has received less attention in the past. Therefore, this research aims to comprehensively define masonry dome behaviors based on the support condition’s effect on the masonry dome’s behavior, in addition to thickness and curve parameters, by determining neutral hoop(s). The method is a graphical and numerical analysis to define the sign-changing positioning in the first principal stress (hoop stress), based on the shell theory and extracted from a finite element method (FEM) Karamba3D analysis of a macro-model. The case studies are in four types of supports: condition fixed, free in the X- and Y-axes, free in all axes (domes placed on a drum), and free in all axes (domes placed on a pendentive and a drum). For each support condition, twelve curves and four varied thicknesses for each curve are considered. Results based on the dome’s variables show that, in general, four types of masonry domes behavior can be identified: single-masonry dome behavior with no neutral hoop; double-masonry dome behavior where all hoops are compressive with a single neutral hoop; double-masonry dome behavior where hoops are compressive and tensile with a single neutral hoop; and treble-masonry dome behavior with double neutral hoops. Full article
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