Special Issue "Non-motor and Non-dopaminergic Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurodegenerative Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bénédicte Ballanger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Université de Lyon, 69622 Lyon, France
2. Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69100 Villeurbanne, France
3. INSERM, U 1028, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, 69000 Lyon, France
4. CNRS, UMR 5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, 69000 Lyon, France
Interests: Parkinson’s disease; neuroimaging; PET; neurotransmission; noradrenaline; dopamine; serotonin; executive control; inhibitory control; motor control; non-motor symptoms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parkinson’s disease has traditionally been considered as a neurological pathology characterized by a progressive, irreversible and ultimately disabling motor deficit related to low dopamine levels within the striatum secondary to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. Up until now, focus on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system has been justified by the prominent motor manifestations for which patients seek treatment and by the remarkable success of dopaminergic replacement therapy. However, while those treatments have improved the prognosis of motor symptoms, they are, at the same time, a new source of disability because of their undesired effects (e.g., dyskinesia and pathological gambling). In addition, most of the current disability brought on by parkinsonian patients relates to symptoms that respond poorly to levodopa (axial motor symptoms) and/or to non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease, such as cognitive or psychiatric disturbance. Recognition of non-motor symptoms is essential, not only for ascertaining the functional status of patients but also for better appreciating the nature of the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, this Special Issue is devoted to bringing new insights from animal and human studies into the respective roles of monoamines, such as acetylcholine, noradrenaline or serotonin in the pathophysiology of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease.

Dr. Bénédicte Ballanger
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-motor symptoms
  • serotonin
  • noradrenaline
  • acetylcholine
  • neuroimaging
  • PET
  • fMRI
  • pharmacology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Impact of Sex on the Neurocognitive Functions of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(10), 1331; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11101331 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 295
Abstract
This study aimed to understand the impact of sex on the neurocognitive function of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Ninety-four participants with idiopathic PD and 167 age-matched healthy individuals as normal controls (NCs) were recruited and underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessments. Sex differences were [...] Read more.
This study aimed to understand the impact of sex on the neurocognitive function of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Ninety-four participants with idiopathic PD and 167 age-matched healthy individuals as normal controls (NCs) were recruited and underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessments. Sex differences were found in NCs, but not in patients with PD. Among male participants, patients with PD showed worse performance on the Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS) (p < 0.001) test and Symbol Search (SS) (p < 0.001) than NCs. Among female participants, patients with PD showed worse performance on the category score of the Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (p < 0.001), SS (p < 0.001), and pentagon copying (p < 0.001) than NCs. After controlling for the effects of age and years of education, Hoehn and Yahr stage was found to predict the performance of the Color Trails Test part A (βA = 0.241, pA = 0.036), Stroop Color and Word Test (β = −0.245, p = 0.036), and DSS (β = −0.258, p = 0.035) in men with PD. These results indicate the differential effect of sex on the neurocognitive function among healthy aging and PD populations. The disappearance of sex differences, which is present in healthy aging, in patients with PD suggests a gradual loss of the neuroprotective effect of estrogen after the initiation of the neurodegenerative process. This study also found mental flexibility and visuospatial function to be the susceptible cognitive domains in women with PD, while the disease severity could predict the working memory and processing speed in men with PD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-motor and Non-dopaminergic Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease)
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