Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Their Applications

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 10452

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Photonics Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 511443, China
Interests: biosensors; photodetectors; sensors; nanofabrication; nanoelectronics; integrated photonics; semiconductor devices; semiconductor physics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418, China
Interests: biosensors; quantum dots; optoelectronic divices

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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, 2 Sipailou Road, Nanjing 210096, China
Interests: biosensors; drug delivery; nanomedicine; cancer therapy; antibacterial; pharmaceuticals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors are indispensable devices for information acquisition and transformation in the era of the Internet of things (IoT). In scientific research, the information conveyed by these sensors can often provide invaluable insights into the nature of many physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. Nanoparticles are a reduced dimensional form of matter that feature large surface-to-volume ratios and inherently entail a set of unique physical and chemical properties, such as a quantum confinement effect, plamonic effect, enhanced catalytic activity, enhanced surface reactivity, etc. Leveraging these properties for sensing may help boost the sensitivity of existing biosensors.

In this Special Issue, “Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors”, we invite the authors to submit original research and comprehensive review papers with experimental and/or theoretical results on leveraging nanoparticles for biosensing. The research topics are broadly defined, including, but not limited to, nanoparticle preparation and characterization, the application of nanoparticles for biosensing, sensor interfacing and signal processing, etc.

Prof. Dr. Yang Zhang
Prof. Dr. Yufeng Liu
Prof. Dr. Fu-Gen Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • quantum dots
  • photodetectors
  • biosensors
  • nanoprobes
  • imaging
  • fluorescence
  • infrared
  • light emission
  • read-out circuits

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 3447 KiB  
Article
Innovative Detection of Biomarkers Based on Chemiluminescent Nanoparticles and a Lensless Optical Sensor
by Cristina Potrich, Gianluca Palmara, Francesca Frascella, Lucio Pancheri and Lorenzo Lunelli
Biosensors 2024, 14(4), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14040184 - 9 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 806
Abstract
The identification and quantification of biomarkers with innovative technologies is an urgent need for the precise diagnosis and follow up of human diseases. Body fluids offer a variety of informative biomarkers, which are traditionally measured with time-consuming and expensive methods. In this context, [...] Read more.
The identification and quantification of biomarkers with innovative technologies is an urgent need for the precise diagnosis and follow up of human diseases. Body fluids offer a variety of informative biomarkers, which are traditionally measured with time-consuming and expensive methods. In this context, lateral flow tests (LFTs) represent a rapid and low-cost technology with a sensitivity that is potentially improvable by chemiluminescence biosensing. Here, an LFT based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies labeled with the enzyme horseradish peroxidase is combined with a lensless biosensor. This biosensor comprises four Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) coupled in close proximity to the LFT strip. Microfluidics for liquid handling complete the system. The development and the setup of the biosensor is carefully described and characterized. C-reactive protein was selected as a proof-of-concept biomarker to define the limit of detection, which resulted in about 0.8 pM when gold nanoparticles were used. The rapid readout (less than 5 min) and the absence of sample preparation make this biosensor promising for the direct and fast detection of human biomarkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Their Applications)
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11 pages, 1241 KiB  
Article
Fluorometric and Colorimetric Method for SARS-CoV-2 Detection Using Designed Aptamer Display Particles
by Ki Sung Park, Anna Choi, Tae-In Park and Seung Pil Pack
Biosensors 2024, 14(3), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14030113 - 20 Feb 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1389
Abstract
SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, has spurred the urgent need for practical diagnostics with high sensitivity and selectivity. Although advanced diagnostic tools have emerged to efficiently control pandemics, they still have costly limitations owing to their reliance on antibodies or [...] Read more.
SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, has spurred the urgent need for practical diagnostics with high sensitivity and selectivity. Although advanced diagnostic tools have emerged to efficiently control pandemics, they still have costly limitations owing to their reliance on antibodies or enzymes and require high-tech equipment. Therefore, there is still a need to develop rapid and low-cost diagnostics with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this study, we generated aptamer display particles (AdP), enabling easy fabrication of a SARS-CoV-2 detection matrix through particle PCR, and applied it to diagnosis using fluorometric and colorimetric assays. We designed two AdPs, C1-AdP and C4-AdP, displayed with SpS1-C1 and SpS1-C4 aptamers, respectively, and showed their high binding ability against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein with a concentration-dependent fluorescence increase. This enabled detection even at low concentrations (0.5 nM). To validate its use as a diagnostic tool for SARS-CoV-2, we designed a sandwich-type assay using two AdPs and high-quality aptamers targeting SARS-CoV-2 pseudoviruses. The fluorometric assay achieved a detection limit of 3.9 × 103 pseudoviruses/mL. The colorimetric assay using an amplification approach exhibited higher sensitivity, with a detection limit of 1 × 101 pseudoviruses/mL, and a broad range of over four orders of magnitude was observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Their Applications)
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19 pages, 10362 KiB  
Article
Sulfur-Doped Organosilica Nanodots as a Universal Sensor for Ultrafast Live/Dead Cell Discrimination
by Yan-Hong Li, Jia Zeng, Zihao Wang, Tian-Yu Wang, Shun-Yu Wu, Xiao-Yu Zhu, Xinping Zhang, Bai-Hui Shan, Cheng-Zhe Gao, Shi-Hao Wang and Fu-Gen Wu
Biosensors 2022, 12(11), 1000; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12111000 - 10 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2117
Abstract
Rapid and accurate differentiation between live and dead cells is highly desirable for the evaluation of cell viability. Here, we report the application of the orange-emitting sulfur-doped organosilica nanodots (S-OSiNDs) for ultrafast (30 s), ultrasensitive (1 μg/mL), and universal staining of the dead [...] Read more.
Rapid and accurate differentiation between live and dead cells is highly desirable for the evaluation of cell viability. Here, we report the application of the orange-emitting sulfur-doped organosilica nanodots (S-OSiNDs) for ultrafast (30 s), ultrasensitive (1 μg/mL), and universal staining of the dead bacterial, fungal, and mammalian cells but not the live ones, which satisfies the requirements of a fluorescent probe that can specifically stain the dead cells. We further verify that the fluorescence distribution range of S-OSiNDs (which are distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus) is much larger than that of the commercial dead/fixed cell/tissue staining dye RedDot2 (which is distributed in the nucleus) in terms of dead mammalian cell staining, indicating that S-OSiNDs possess a better staining effect of dead cells than RedDot2. Overall, S-OSiNDs can be used as a robust fluorescent probe for ultrafast and accurate discrimination between dead and live cells at a single cell level, which may find a variety of applications in the biomedical field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Their Applications)
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Review

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22 pages, 21708 KiB  
Review
Graphene-Based Electrochemical Biosensors for Breast Cancer Detection
by Ali Mohammadpour-Haratbar, Seyyed Behnam Abdollahi Boraei, Yasser Zare, Kyong Yop Rhee and Soo-Jin Park
Biosensors 2023, 13(1), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13010080 - 3 Jan 2023
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 5091
Abstract
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women, which is also the second most public cancer worldwide. When detected early, BC can be treated more easily and prevented from spreading beyond the breast. In recent years, various BC biosensor strategies have [...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women, which is also the second most public cancer worldwide. When detected early, BC can be treated more easily and prevented from spreading beyond the breast. In recent years, various BC biosensor strategies have been studied, including optical, electrical, electrochemical, and mechanical biosensors. In particular, the high sensitivity and short detection time of electrochemical biosensors make them suitable for the recognition of BC biomarkers. Moreover, the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be increased by incorporating nanomaterials. In this respect, the outstanding mechanical and electrical performances of graphene have led to an increasingly intense study of graphene-based materials for BC electrochemical biosensors. Hence, the present review examines the latest advances in graphene-based electrochemical biosensors for BC biosensing. For each biosensor, the detection limit (LOD), linear range (LR), and diagnosis technique are analyzed. This is followed by a discussion of the prospects and current challenges, along with potential strategies for enhancing the performance of electrochemical biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Their Applications)
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