Advances in Sport Injuries

A special issue of Biomechanics (ISSN 2673-7078). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Biomechanics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 8479

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, George Mason University, 4400 University Dr, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
Interests: biomechanics; material science and advanced manufacturing techniques

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Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, International Institute of Biomechanics and Surgical Ergonomics, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada
Interests: gait; posture; biomechanics; Olympic/Paralympic sports; high performance; standing; sitting; surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the substantial positive effect of physical activities for a healthy lifestyle, sport injuries are one of the most common type of injuries, not only in athletes but also in normal healthy populations. Sport biomechanics is an essential science for avoiding sport injuries through developing a fundamental understanding of musculoskeletal system in sport movements, as well as the interactions between athletes, sport equipment, and other objects. This knowledge is essential for sport equipment designers to develop better products, as well as for athletic trainers to improve their trainees’ performance. As such, this Special Issue focuses on biomechanical research in sport, gait analysis in sport, stress on musculoskeletal system during sport activities, and sport equipment design.

Dr. Shaghayegh Bagheri
Prof. Dr. Francois Prince
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1231 KiB  
Article
Capturing in Season Change-of-Direction Movement Pattern Change in Youth Soccer Players with Inertial Measurement Units
by Aki-Matti Alanen, Olivia L. Bruce, Lauren C. Benson, Mathieu Chin, Carla van den Berg, Matthew J. Jordan, Reed Ferber and Kati Pasanen
Biomechanics 2023, 3(1), 155-165; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics3010014 - 20 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1771
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the utility of inertial measurement unit (IMU) technology to identify angle, step-specific, and side-specific differences between youth soccer players with and without a history of lower limb injury during soccer-specific field tests. Thirty-two youths (mean age 16.4 years) [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine the utility of inertial measurement unit (IMU) technology to identify angle, step-specific, and side-specific differences between youth soccer players with and without a history of lower limb injury during soccer-specific field tests. Thirty-two youths (mean age 16.4 years) who were elite soccer players (Females n = 13, Males n = 19) wore IMUs during pre- and postseason soccer-specific change-of-direction assessments. A response feature analysis was used to compare the change in peak resultant acceleration of the groups at a level of significance of p < 0.05. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in change of peak resultant acceleration of right leg final foot contact in a 180° pivot turn (p = 0.012, ES = 1.0) and a 90° cut (p = 0.04, ES = 0.75) between the two groups. These data suggest that players with a history of lower limb injury might experience greater angle and side-specific change within a season in peak resultant acceleration when compared with injury-free athletes. This study demonstrates that IMUs may present a useful method to analyze youth soccer players’ change of direction movement after returning to play. These results can inform future studies investigating player monitoring and may prove to be a useful tool for coaches when designing individualized training programs in this population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport Injuries)
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10 pages, 1564 KiB  
Article
Lower-Extremity Kinematics of Soccer Players with Chronic Ankle Instability during Running: A Case-Control Study
by Akihiro Tamura, Keita Shimura and Yuri Inoue
Biomechanics 2023, 3(1), 93-102; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics3010009 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2081
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of lower-extremity kinematics during the running of soccer players with chronic ankle instability (CAI) in comparison to those without CAI. Twenty-two male college soccer players participated in this study. Twelve players were assigned [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of lower-extremity kinematics during the running of soccer players with chronic ankle instability (CAI) in comparison to those without CAI. Twenty-two male college soccer players participated in this study. Twelve players were assigned to the CAI group and ten players to the non-CAI group, and players were diagnosed according to the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Kinematic data of the hip, knee, ankle, foot, and ground reaction force components during the stance phase of running were obtained using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results revealed that soccer players with CAI who landed with ankle inversion and other characteristic kinematics in their lower extremity during the stance phase of running were similar to those without CAI. These results show that running kinematics in soccer players are not affected by the presence or absence of CAI. Future studies based on the results of this study may contribute to the analysis of the risk of developing CAI during soccer and may also help prevent lateral ankle sprains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport Injuries)
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7 pages, 242 KiB  
Article
Preparedness during Head Impacts in Intercollegiate Men’s and Women’s Soccer Athletes
by Bradley C. Jackson, Catherine E. Rogerson, Debbie A. Bradney, Katherine M. Breedlove and Thomas G. Bowman
Biomechanics 2023, 3(1), 45-51; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics3010004 - 06 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1425
Abstract
Research in hockey has found that preparedness and activity alter head impact magnitudes. It is unknown if similar occurrences take place in soccer. Therefore, our study purpose was to determine differences in the magnitudes and frequencies of head impacts due to sex and [...] Read more.
Research in hockey has found that preparedness and activity alter head impact magnitudes. It is unknown if similar occurrences take place in soccer. Therefore, our study purpose was to determine differences in the magnitudes and frequencies of head impacts due to sex and preparedness. Sixteen female (age: 19 ± 1.05 years, height: 163.68 ± 5.03 cm, mass: 61.36 ± 4.99 kg) and 14 male (age: 20 ± 1.07 years, height: 180.34 ± 5.58 cm, mass: 74.357 ± 8.64 kg) Division III intercollegiate soccer players were included in this study. The independent variables were sex and preparedness (anticipated with good body position, anticipated with poor body position, and unanticipated). xPatch sensors (X2 Biosystems, Seattle, WA, USA) applied over the participants’ right mastoid processes for practices and games provided the frequency and biomechanics of all of the head impacts over 10 g. A total of 860 female and 870 male impacts were verified and coded by preparedness and activity during 1182 female (IR = 727.58, CI = 678.95–776.21) and 801 male (IR = 1086.14, CI = 1013.97–1158.32; IRR = 1.49, CI = 1.36–1.64) exposures. The interaction between sex and preparedness was significant for the combined dependent variables (multivariate F6,3442 = 3.67, p = 0.001, ηp2 < 0.01). Male and female intercollegiate soccer players, although exposed to different frequencies of head impacts, sustained similar magnitude impacts to the head within the preparedness categories. Training interventions should aim at improving technique while sustaining impacts as both sexes often received impacts while unprepared. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport Injuries)

Review

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15 pages, 1440 KiB  
Review
Shoulder Pain Biomechanics, Rehabilitation and Prevention in Wheelchair Basketball Players: A Narrative Review
by Giacomo Farì, Francesca Latino, Francesco Tafuri, Laura Dell’Anna, Maria Vittoria Raele, Annatonia Fai, Carlo De Serio, Giorgia Intonti, Anna Lisa De Salvo, Vincenzo Ricci, Emma Saraiello, Valerio Bonavolontà, Andrea Bernetti, Silvia Fiore, Marisa Megna and Maurizio Ranieri
Biomechanics 2023, 3(3), 362-376; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics3030030 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2469
Abstract
Wheelchair basketball (WB) is an increasingly popular sport that guarantees numerous health benefits for people with disabilities who regularly practice it, such as an improved quality of life and psychophysical well-being. However, WB is a contact and high-stress sport, which exposes players to [...] Read more.
Wheelchair basketball (WB) is an increasingly popular sport that guarantees numerous health benefits for people with disabilities who regularly practice it, such as an improved quality of life and psychophysical well-being. However, WB is a contact and high-stress sport, which exposes players to frequent overloads and injuries, mainly affecting the upper limbs. Therefore, shoulder pain (SP) is the most common musculoskeletal disorder among WB players, forcing them to suspend or abandon this sport activity. This narrative review aims to summarize all the known literature on this topic and to be a starting point for further research. Firstly, it explores the biomechanical causes that lead to SP and the underlying diseases, among which the most recurrent are rotator cuff tendinopathies. Furthermore, this overview deepens the most effective and specific rehabilitation programs for SP in WB players and it emphasizes the need for further studies to trial new rehabilitative protocols using novel technologies to make them faster and more personalized. In this regard, the general recommendation still remains to perform a combination of exercises such as strengthening, endurance and stretching exercises of various durations and intensities. To conclude, the most important prevention strategies are described, underlining the need for constant sport-specific training led by qualified personnel and suggesting some insights on possible new research aimed at improving wheelchair ergonomics, stressing the importance of a multidisciplinary team fully dedicated to the individual athlete. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport Injuries)
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