Special Issue "Advance in Sleep and Circadian Rhythms"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1332

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Cristina Nicolau
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratori de Neurofisiologia del Son i Ritmes Biològics, Institut d’Investigació Sanitária Illes Balears (IDISBA), Universitat Illes Balears, (UIB), 07122 Palma, Spain
Interests: sleep physiology; sleep disorders; circadian rhythms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sleep is a pleasing state regulated by circadian and homeostatic mechanisms, and characterized by quiescence, rapid reversibility, specific sleeping sites and body positions, and raised sensory thresholds. Sleep-associated problems can be classified into two main categories: theoretical and sanitary.

In theoretical terms, we ignore how sleep evolved in the animal kingdom as well as many aspects of the circadian regulation of sleep. Likewise, we ignore the brain structures responsible of the homeostatic regulation and, perhaps the most important question we ignore is why we sleep.

Sleep disturbances, which have been referred to as the silent epidemic, constitute a serious health problem. One in six adults in the US were diagnosed with a sleep disorder and one in eight use sleeping aids. Additionally, one in every three fatal traffic accidents is caused by tiredness or drowsiness and three out of every four drivers admit to having driven while drowsy. Sleep involves immense direct and indirect economic costs in the form of lost working time, depression and highly prevalent associated health problems such as neurodegenerative disorders. Sleep and circadian dysregulation could help to identify the risk of suffering from neurodegenerative diseases.

We propose that sleep researchers interested in the theoretical and medical aspects of sleep will be interested in participating in an updated theoretical Special Issue on this subject, including circadian and homeostatic factors as well as the medical and pharmacological aspects of sleep.

Prof. Dr. Cristina Nicolau
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sleep physiology

  • sleep regulation
  • sleep disorders
  • circadian rhythms
  • circadian dysregulation
  • sleep evolution
  • sleep function

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Enhancing Night and Day Circadian Contrast through Sleep Education in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Biology 2022, 11(6), 893; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11060893 - 10 Jun 2022
Viewed by 379
Abstract
Background: Evidence supports a causal relationship between circadian disturbance and impaired glucose homeostasis. Methods: To determine the effect of an educational intervention delivered by primary care nurses to improve sleep hygiene, a parallel, open-label clinical trial in subjects aged 18 and older with [...] Read more.
Background: Evidence supports a causal relationship between circadian disturbance and impaired glucose homeostasis. Methods: To determine the effect of an educational intervention delivered by primary care nurses to improve sleep hygiene, a parallel, open-label clinical trial in subjects aged 18 and older with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was performed. Study variables were sex, age, fasting glucose, glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), sleep duration and efficiency, body mass index, antidiabetic treatment, diet and physical exercise. An individual informative educational intervention was carried out following a bidirectional feedback method. The intervention aimed to develop skills to improve sleep through nine simple tips. An analysis of covariance was performed on all the mean centred outcome variables controlling for the respective baseline scores. Results: In the intervention group, PSQI dropped, the duration and quality of sleep increased, and a decrease in fasting glucose and in HbA1c levels was observed. Conclusion: The proposed intervention is effective for improving sleep quality, length and efficiency, and for decreasing fasting glucose and HbA1c levels in only 3 months. These findings support the importance of sleep and circadian rhythm education focused on improving IFG and T2DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Sleep and Circadian Rhythms)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
The Birth of the Mammalian Sleep
Biology 2022, 11(5), 734; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11050734 - 11 May 2022
Viewed by 678
Abstract
Mammals evolved from small-sized reptiles that developed endothermic metabolism. This allowed filling the nocturnal niche. They traded-off visual acuity for sensitivity but became defenseless against the dangerous daylight. To avoid such danger, they rested with closed eyes in lightproof burrows during light-time. This [...] Read more.
Mammals evolved from small-sized reptiles that developed endothermic metabolism. This allowed filling the nocturnal niche. They traded-off visual acuity for sensitivity but became defenseless against the dangerous daylight. To avoid such danger, they rested with closed eyes in lightproof burrows during light-time. This was the birth of the mammalian sleep, the main finding of this report. Improved audition and olfaction counterweighed the visual impairments and facilitated the cortical development. This process is called “The Nocturnal Evolutionary Bottleneck”. Pre-mammals were nocturnal until the Cretacic-Paleogene extinction of dinosaurs. Some early mammals returned to diurnal activity, and this allowed the high variability in sleeping patterns observed today. The traits of Waking Idleness are almost identical to those of behavioral sleep, including homeostatic regulation. This is another important finding of this report. In summary, behavioral sleep seems to be an upgrade of Waking Idleness Indeed, the trait that never fails to show is quiescence. We conclude that the main function of sleep consists in guaranteeing it during a part of the daily cycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Sleep and Circadian Rhythms)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop