Special Issue "The Path to Sustainable Production and Application of Algae"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Inna Khozin-Goldberg
Website
Guest Editor
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Beer Sheba, Israel
Interests: microalgal biotechnology; lipids; metabolic engineering; microalgae
Prof. Dr. Dina Zilberg
Website
Guest Editor
French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Jacob Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, BGU, Sede-Boqer 84990, Israel;
Telephone: +972-8-6596818; Fax: +972-8-6596742
Interests: Specializes in fish health and the application of microalgal to improve the health of fish, including: immunomodulation by dietary supplementation with microalgae; disease-treatment using microalgal-derived therapeutants
Prof. Dr. Alexei Solovchenko
Website
Guest Editor
Bioengineering Department, Faculty of Biology, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 1/12 Leninskie Gori, Moscow GSP-1 119234, Russia
Interests: stress physiology of photosynthetic organisms; microalgal biology and biotechnology; sustainable using of nutrients; non-invasive monitoring of microalgae
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last several decades, cultivation of microalgae has evolved into a globally established, economically important branch of biotechnology. Microalgal biotechnology and its derived technologies are now considered among the most promising responses to global challenges. Currently most mature and commercially successful are the microalgae-based processes for the production of nutraceuticals (carotenoids and fatty acids), fine chemicals (including potential therapeutants), cosmetic ingredients, feed and food ingredients. Microalgae can be cultured by sustainable methods thus providing a wide range of health beneficial metabolites from natural sources with lesser environmental impact. Significant increase in biomass productivity is needed to reach economic viability of algal production. Algal cultivation shows a great potential for efficient recovery of nutrients and carbon from waste and side streams, thereby contributing to the circular bio-economy for improved resource management, particularly in arid environments. Economic viability of algal biotechnology can be improved by increasing productivity and by selecting species that produce high-value compounds that are beneficial for human and animal health.

This Special Issue is intended to integrate the progress in overcoming the current barriers for improving the efficiency of microalgal biotechnologies and their practical implementation. We welcome contributions deepening on the mechanistic insights into the key determinants of microalgal productivity and stress resilience, as well as on application in aquaculture. In addition to full-length research articles we would be happy to consider your minireviews summarizing the recent progress in the field after prior negotiation of the topic with the editors of the Special Issue.

This issue is planned to be associated with a session at Drylands, Deserts and Desertification 2020, The 7th International Conference, 15–19 November 2020 https://dddconf.org/. This issue is also open for submissions by scholars besides participants of this meeting.

Prof. Dr. Inna Khozin-Goldberg
Prof. Dr. Dina Zilberg
Prof. Dr. Alexei Solovchenko
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aquaculture
  • applications
  • biotechnology
  • carotenoids
  • microalgae
  • immunomodulation
  • health benefits
  • productivity
  • PUFA
  • stress tolerance

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessReview
Enhancing Sustainability by Improving Plant Salt Tolerance through Macro- and Micro-Algal Biostimulants
Biology 2020, 9(9), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9090253 - 28 Aug 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Algal biomass, extracts, or derivatives have long been considered a valuable material to bring benefits to humans and cultivated plants. In the last decades, it became evident that algal formulations can induce multiple effects on crops (including an increase in biomass, yield, and [...] Read more.
Algal biomass, extracts, or derivatives have long been considered a valuable material to bring benefits to humans and cultivated plants. In the last decades, it became evident that algal formulations can induce multiple effects on crops (including an increase in biomass, yield, and quality), and that algal extracts contain a series of bioactive compounds and signaling molecules, in addition to mineral and organic nutrients. The need to reduce the non-renewable chemical input in agriculture has recently prompted an increase in the use of algal extracts as a plant biostimulant, also because of their ability to promote plant growth in suboptimal conditions such as saline environments is beneficial. In this article, we discuss some research areas that are critical for the implementation in agriculture of macro- and microalgae extracts as plant biostimulants. Specifically, we provide an overview of current knowledge and achievements about extraction methods, compositions, and action mechanisms of algal extracts, focusing on salt-stress tolerance. We also outline current limitations and possible research avenues. We conclude that the comparison and the integration of knowledge on the molecular and physiological response of plants to salt and to algal extracts should also guide the extraction procedures and application methods. The effects of algal biostimulants have been mainly investigated from an applied perspective, and the exploitation of different scientific disciplines is still much needed for the development of new sustainable strategies to increase crop tolerance to salt stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Path to Sustainable Production and Application of Algae)
Open AccessArticle
Comparison of the Photoautotrophic Growth Regimens of Chlorella sorokiniana in a Photobioreactor for Enhanced Biomass Productivity
Biology 2020, 9(7), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9070169 - 16 Jul 2020
Abstract
Microalgae have a wide industrial potential because of their high metabolic diversity and plasticity. Selection of optimal cultivation methods is important to optimize multi-purpose microalgal biotechnologies. In this research, Chlorella sorokiniana AM-02 that was isolated from a freshwater lake was cultured under various [...] Read more.
Microalgae have a wide industrial potential because of their high metabolic diversity and plasticity. Selection of optimal cultivation methods is important to optimize multi-purpose microalgal biotechnologies. In this research, Chlorella sorokiniana AM-02 that was isolated from a freshwater lake was cultured under various high photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) conditions and CO2 gas levels in standard Bold’s basal medium (BBM). Furthermore, a wide range of nitrate levels (180–1440 mg L−1) was tested on the growth of C. sorokiniana. Microalgae growth, pigment concentration, medium pH, exit gas composition, as well as nitrate, phosphate, and sulfate levels were measured during an experimental period. The preferred high PPFD and optimal CO2 levels were found to be 1000–1400 μmol photons m−2 s−1 and 0.5–2.0% (v/v), respectively. The addition of nitrate ions (up to 1440 mg L−1) to the standard growth medium increased final optical density (OD750), cell count, pigment concentration, and total biomass yield but decreased the initial growth rate at high nitrate levels. Our findings can serve as the basis for a robust photoautotrophic cultivation system to maximize the productivity of large-scale microalgal cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Path to Sustainable Production and Application of Algae)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Dietary Supplementation with Omega-6 LC-PUFA-Rich Microalgae Regulates Mucosal Immune Response and Promotes Microbial Diversity in the Zebrafish Gut
Biology 2020, 9(6), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9060119 - 05 Jun 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The effect of dietary omega-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) on host microbiome and gut associated immune function in fish is unexplored. The effect of dietary supplementation with the omega-6 LC-PUFA-rich microalga Lobosphaera incisa wild type (WT) and its delta-5 desaturase mutant (MUT), [...] Read more.
The effect of dietary omega-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) on host microbiome and gut associated immune function in fish is unexplored. The effect of dietary supplementation with the omega-6 LC-PUFA-rich microalga Lobosphaera incisa wild type (WT) and its delta-5 desaturase mutant (MUT), rich in arachidonic-acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), respectively, on intestinal gene expression and microbial diversity was analyzed in zebrafish. For 1 month, fish were fed diets supplemented with broken biomass at 7.5% and 15% (w/w) of the two L. incisa strains and a control nonsupplemented commercial diet. Dietary supplementation resulted in elevated expression of genes related to arachidonic acid metabolism-cyclooxygenase 2 (cox-2), lipoxygenase 1(lox-1), anti-inflammatory cytokine-interleukin 10 (il-10), immune defense-lysozyme (lys), intestinal alkaline phosphatase (iap), complement (c3b), and antioxidants-catalase (cat), glutathione peroxidase (gpx). Microbiome analysis of the gut showed higher diversity indices for microbial communities in fish that were fed the supplemented diets compared to controls. Different treatment groups shared 237 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that corresponded to the core microbiome, and unique OTUs were evident in different dietary groups. Overall, the zebrafish gut microbiome was dominated by the phylum Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria (averaging 38.4% and 34.6%, respectively), followed by Bacteroidetes (12.9%), Tenericutes, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria (at 3.1–1.3%). Significant interaction between some of the immune-related genes and microbial community was demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Path to Sustainable Production and Application of Algae)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Snow Microalga Chloromonas reticulata as a Potential Source of Carotenoids
Authors: O.V. Dymova, I.V. Novakovskaya, E.N. Patova, A.D. Patova, D.A. Postelnii and A.A. Petychov
Abstract: The optimal cultivation parameters were determined for a green microalgae strain, Chloromonas reticulata SYKOA Ch-054-11, isolated from the red snow samples collected in the Subpolar Urals and stored in a collection of living algae cultures of Institute of Biology of Komi of the Komi Scientific Center, the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of carotenoids in the microalgae cells was performed. The concentration of carotenoids reached 63.5 ± 6.5 μg/ml under cultivated laboratory conditions. The cells of studied algae synthesized β-carotene (precursor to astaxanthin), xanthophylls – neoxanthin and lutein, and pigments of the violaxanthin cycle (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, zeaxanthin). Induction of astaxanthin synthesis was observed under the high light conditions (500 μmol m−2 s−1). The mixotrophy of the algae was experimentally confirmed in the study.
Keywords: Chloromonas reticulata; algae; carotenoids; astaxanthin; high light; temperature

Back to TopTop