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Article

The Influence of Workload and Work Flexibility on Work-Life Conflict and the Role of Emotional Exhaustion

1
Professor for health promotion and prevention, Faculty of Health and Healthcare Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Zwickau, 08056 Zwickau, Germany
2
Institute for Education and Psychology, University of Applied Sciences, 4040 Linz, Austria
3
Institute of Biopsychology, Faculty of Psychology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany
4
Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, 8006 Zürich, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110174
Received: 4 October 2020 / Revised: 5 November 2020 / Accepted: 10 November 2020 / Published: 16 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout, Perceived Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction)
The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between contextual work-related factors in terms of job demands (workload—WL) and job resources (work flexibility—WF), work–life conflict (WLC) and the burnout dimension emotional exhaustion (EE) in a large population-based sample. Building on the job demands resources model (JDRM), we have developed the hypothesis that WL has an indirect effect on EE that is mediated by WLC. We conducted a secondary analysis using data from the Dresden Burnout Study (DBS, N = 4246, mean age (SD) = 42.7 years (10.5); 36.4% male). Results from structural equation modelling revealed that EE is positively associated with WL (β = 0.15, p = 0.001) and negatively associated with WF (β = −0.13, p = 0.001), also after accounting for potential confounding variables (demography, depressive symptoms, and lifetime diagnosis of burnout). Both effects are mediated by WLC (β = 0.18; p = 0.001 and β = 0.08; p = 0.001, respectively) highlighting the important role of WLC in employee health. In summary, WF may help to reduce burnout symptoms in employees, whereas WL may increase them. Study results suggest that both associations depend on WLC levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: work-life-conflict; burnout; workload; work flexibility; job demands-resources model work-life-conflict; burnout; workload; work flexibility; job demands-resources model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Buruck, G.; Pfarr, A.-L.; Penz, M.; Wekenborg, M.; Rothe, N.; Walther, A. The Influence of Workload and Work Flexibility on Work-Life Conflict and the Role of Emotional Exhaustion. Behav. Sci. 2020, 10, 174. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110174

AMA Style

Buruck G, Pfarr A-L, Penz M, Wekenborg M, Rothe N, Walther A. The Influence of Workload and Work Flexibility on Work-Life Conflict and the Role of Emotional Exhaustion. Behavioral Sciences. 2020; 10(11):174. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110174

Chicago/Turabian Style

Buruck, Gabriele, Anna-Lisa Pfarr, Marlene Penz, Magdalena Wekenborg, Nicole Rothe, and Andreas Walther. 2020. "The Influence of Workload and Work Flexibility on Work-Life Conflict and the Role of Emotional Exhaustion" Behavioral Sciences 10, no. 11: 174. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10110174

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